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Local Number Portability Traffic Analysis Calculations

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Consumers can keep their telephone number and have any provider that will serve them. ... used to derive location information based on your telephone number. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Local Number Portability Traffic Analysis Calculations


1
Local Number PortabilityTraffic Analysis
Calculations
  • ENGR 475 Telecommunications
  • October 19, 2006
  • Harding University
  • Jonathan White

2
Outline - LNP
  • Definition of Local Number Portability
  • Required by Law
  • New components in the network
  • Why have LNP
  • Wireless and LNP
  • 911 and LNP

3
Outline Traffic Analysis
  • What Traffic Engineering is used for
  • Busy Hour traffic
  • A.K. Erlangs Distributions
  • Examples of board

4
Local Number Portability
  • LNP
  • Mandated by the Telecommunications Act of 1996.
  • Telcos had until 2002 to completely comply.
  • What it is
  • Consumers can keep their telephone number and
    have any provider that will serve them.
  • Consumers can also keep their telephone number
    when they move to a new location.

5
Benefits of LNP
  • More competition drives lower prices and better
    service.
  • Telecommunications biggest enemies
  • Churn
  • Fraud
  • Most people want to keep their telephone numbers.
  • Why would this be true?
  • The LNP act gives these people the ability to
    have competition for their dollars.

6
Wireless LNP
  • Because of LNP, you can get a local telephone
    number any where in the US, no matter where you
    live.
  • For example, I bought my phone in Bentonville,
    Arkansas, but I was able to get a local Searcy
    number.
  • However, having wireless LNP makes billing even
    more complex.

7
Additional Network Objects
  • On the SS7 network, a new database is required to
    support LNP so that the call is routed across the
    correct network.
  • Providers can actually pay to have access to
    updated LNP databases.
  • GTE and Cincinnati Bell Information Services
  • This adds cost and delay to the system.
  • This database is called the local service
    management system.
  • Local SMS.

8
911 and LNP
  • The 911 system used to derive location
    information based on your telephone number.
  • No longer directly possible.
  • Your location information is now passed to 911
    through database access.
  • This makes the 911 system less reliable.

9
911 and Wireless
  • Cell phone towers are no equipped with GPS units
    so that they can calculate where your call came
    from.
  • If 3 or more towers are within your signal range,
    they can triangulate your exact location.
  • But again, LNP means 1 more database dip.
  • Also, the databases must be maintained.

10
Who Pays
  • We ultimately pay for local number portability.
  • Is it worth it?

11
Traffic Analysis
  • Method for determining the cost effectiveness of
    various sizes and configurations of networks.
  • Helps us to decide how many telephone trunks we
    should use to service organizations.
  • Formulas were used now, computer modeling is
    almost exclusively used.

12
Uses of Traffic Engineering
  • Utilizing the correct number of links at the best
    price point.
  • Cost versus effectiveness
  • What do you engineer to?
  • The busiest hour?
  • The average amount of traffic?
  • The minimum required that will still retain
    customers?
  • How are our road systems engineered?

13
Agner Krarup Erlang
  • Danish mathematician and engineer.
  • 1878 1929
  • Worked for the telephone company in Copenhagen
    from 1908 to 1929.
  • Applied math to calculating how many circuits and
    telephone operators were needed.
  • His formulas were incredibly good for the time
    period, and they were used until very recently.

14
Grade of Service
  • GOS How many callers will be refused service.
  • This could be a busy tone or a redirection to
    voice mail.
  • Telephone companies have designed their networks
    so that the probability that a circuit will be
    blocked must be between 1 and 5 percent.
  • To get a lower blocking percentage than 1 percent
    gets exponentially more difficult.

15
Traffic Analysis
  • Erlangs ideas are used extensively in
  • Data networks
  • Voice networks
  • Busy hour traffic on interstates
  • Banking/Supermarket queuing theory.
  • General max/min optimization problems

16
Traffic Analysis
  • The rest is on the board
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