Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners: Cycle 4-LEP Student Success Initiative Awardees Leadership Conference - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners: Cycle 4-LEP Student Success Initiative Awardees Leadership Conference

Description:

Lau v. Nichols (1974), U.S. Supreme Court ... Rachel Carson Elementary School. Josiah L. Pickard Elementary School. Anderson Elementary School ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:111
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 114
Provided by: ellTa
Learn more at: http://ell.tamucc.edu
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners: Cycle 4-LEP Student Success Initiative Awardees Leadership Conference


1
Meeting the Needs of English Language
LearnersCycle 4-LEP Student Success
Initiative Awardees Leadership Conference
Dr. Frank Lucido Institute for Second Language
Achievement Texas AM University Corpus Christi
2
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTENGLISH LANGUAGE
LEARNERS (ELL)
Mission Statement To assist high potential
schools with planning and implementing effective
practices to enhance language and academic
achievement of English language learners.
3
I S L A
W E B P A G E
http//ell.tamucc.edu
4
You Might Be A Teacher IF
5
You want to slap the next person who says, Must
be nice to work 800 320 and have summers free.
6
You Might Be A Teacher IF
7
You arent sure about having children of your own
because theres no name you could give a child
that wouldnt bring on high blood pressure the
moment you heard it uttered.
8
You Might Be A Teacher IF..
9
You can tell if its a full moon without ever
looking outside.
10
You Might Be A Teacher IF..
11
Meeting a childs parent instantly answers the
question, Why is this kid like this?
12
You Might Be A Teacher IF.
13
When out in public you feel the urge to snap your
fingers at children you do not know and correct
their behavior.
14
The Challenge
  • About 1 in 9 students in the U.S. speaks a
    language other than English at home.
  • The ELL population has grown from 2 million to 5
    million since 1990.
  • About 42.7 of Texas students are Hispanic.
  • About 40 of Hispanic children under eighteen are
    living in poverty.
  • Less than 25 of ELL passed the TAKS in 11th
    grade.
  • It takes 5 7 years to acquire academic language
    proficiency in English.
  • It takes 2 3 years to acquire conversational
    fluency in a second language.

15
Demographic Changes
  • Challenges for the Future of Texas

16
Percent Change in Population from 1990 to 2000
for Council of Government Regions in Texas
17
Population Change in Texas Counties, 1990-2000
Source Texas State Data Center
18
Population Change in Texas Counties, 2000-2003
Source Texas State Data Center
19
Population Change in Texas Counties, 2000-2004
Source U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2004 County
Estimates
20
Numerical Change in Population by Race/Ethnicity
in Texas for 1980-1990 and 1990-2000
21
Percent Change in Population by Race/Ethnicity
for 1980-1990 and 1990-2000 in Texas
22
Percent Change in Population from 1990 to 2000 by
Race/Ethnicity by Metropolitan Status in Texas
23
Percent of Texas Population by Age Groupand
Ethnicity, 2000
24
Percent of Texas Population by Age Groupand
Ethnicity, 2040
25
Projected Proportion of Population by
Race/Ethnicity in Texas, 2000-2040
26
Median Household Income in 1999 in Texas by Age
of Householder
Thousands
27
Median Household Income In 1999 in Texas by
Race/Ethnicity of Householder
28
Educational Attainment in 2000 in Texas for
Persons 25 Years of Age By Race/Ethnicity
Percent
29
States Ranked by Median Household Income in 1999
30
States Ranked by Percent High School Graduates
in the Population 25 Years of Age or Older, 2000
31
States Ranked by Percent College Graduates in
the Population 25 Years of Age or Older, 2000
32
Percent of Students in Each Race/Ethnicity
Category in the 60 Largest School Districts in
Texas, 2003-2004
33
Projected Percent of Public Elementary and
Secondary Enrollment by Race/Ethnicity in 2000
and Projections for 2040
34
Projected Percent of Public University Enrollment
by Race/Ethnicity in 2000 and Projections for
2040
35
Percent Change in Enrollment in Selected
Elementary and Secondary School Programs in
Texas, 2000 to 2040
Percent Change
Projections are for the 1.0 Scenario
36
Average Household Income in Texas,
2000-2040(in 2000 Dollars)
37
Projected Percent of Households in Poverty by
Family Type in Texas, 2000 and 2040
38
The mark of a truly educated man is to be moved
deeply by statistics.
  • George Bernard Shaw

39
Steve Murdock Texas State Data Center Phone
210 458 - 6530 Fax 210 458 -
6540 Website txsdc.utsa.edu
40
Dual Language EducationSDStrongly Disagree
DDisagree Strongly AgreeSA AAgree DKDont
Know
  • 1. The Most important function of language is
    using appropriate grammar structures.
  • 2. Language is difficult to define.
  • 3. Dual Language is a model of bilingual
    education.
  • 4. Language should be acquired rather than
    taught directly.
  • 5. Bilingualism is difficult to assess.
  • 6. The purpose of dual language education is for
    the students to learn a second language.

41
Guidance (not threats) from the Courts and the
Law What is A Meaningful Education for LM
students?
  • There is no equality of treatment merely by
    providing students with the same facilities,
    textbooks, teachers and curriculum for students
    who do not understand English are effectively
    foreclosed from any meaningful education.
  • Lau v. Nichols (1974), U.S. Supreme Court
  • Plaintiff Chinese-American community in San
    Francisco, CA
  • Programs serving LEP/ELL students must
  • Be based on sound educational theory.
  • Be implemented effectively, with adequate
    resources and personnel
  • Be evaluated and found successful in two areas
    the teaching of language (English and others) and
    in access to the full curriculum (math, social
    studies, science)
  • Castaneda v. Pickard, 1981, U.S. Fifth Circuit
    Court of Appeals
  • Plaintiff Mexican-American community in
    Raymondville, TX

42
Goal Equal Educational Opportunity for all
students as defined by equal results, not only by
intents or inputs. Equal Educational Opportunity
Act, 1974. Goal Addressing a meaningful
education using demonstrably effective programs
that lead to long-term parity, not with
minimalist programs that attempt to just get
by. Thomas and Collier
43
Foreign Languages Offered and Age of Introduction
Country 1st Foreign Language Starting Age Additional Languages
Australia French 6 German, Greek, Italian, Japanese
Austria English 6 French, Italian
Czech Republic English and German 9 French, Russian, Spanish
Finland English or other 9 Swedish, Finnish, German, French, Russian, Spanish, Italian
Germany English or other 8 French, Spanish, Russian, Italian, Turkish
Italy English 8 French, German, Spanish, Russian
Luxembourg German and French 6 or 7 English, Italian, Spanish
Spain English 8 French, German, Italian, Portuguese
Thailand English 6 French, German, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic
United States Spanish 14 French, German Japanese
44
(No Transcript)
45
(No Transcript)
46
(No Transcript)
47
IN TRESPASS TO TRY TITLE TO TRACT OF LAND
WHERE THE STATE IN ORDER TO ESTABLISH THAT TRACT
HAS A VACANCY IN PUBLIC DOMAIN ATTACKED VALIDITY
OF A CORRECTED PATENT GRANTED TO DEFENDANTS
PREDECESSOR. COURT OF CIVIL APPEALS BY
REVERSING JUDGMENT OF TRIAL COURT IN FAVOR OF
STATE HOLDING CORRECTED PATENT VOID, AND BY
DENYING RECOVERY TO STATE, DIRECTLY UPHELD
EXISTENCE OR CORRECTED PATENT SO AS TO PRECLUDE
STATE BECAUSE OF STARE DECISIS, FROM THEREAFTER
CHALLENGING VALIDITY OF CORRECTED PATENT AGAINS
SAME DEFENDANTS. ALEXANDER v. STANOLIND OIL
GAS CO. (CIV.APP.1917) 192 S. W. 781, REF. N.
R. E.
48
(No Transcript)
49
(No Transcript)
50
Read the paragraph below and answer the questions
that follow.
A hair raising century by Australian opener
Greene Wood on Friday set England back on its
heels in the third test at the Melbourne Cricket
Ground. Unfortunately, living dangerously
eventually cost the Australians the match. Wood
was caught out of his crease on the first over
after lunch. Within ten more overs, the
Australians were dismissed. Four were dismissed
by dangerous running between balls from the
batsmens wickets. The three remaining batsmen
were caught by English fieldsmen. One was caught
as he tried for a six. When the innings were
complete the Australians had fallen short of the
runs scored by the English. Were you able to
understand the paragraph? Could you explain it to
someone else? If not, what would help you to
understand it better?
51
(No Transcript)
52
(No Transcript)
53
Language Proficiency
SUP MODEL
CUP MODEL
Separate Underlying Proficiency
Common Underlying Proficiency
From Cummins, 1981
54
FIGURE 1-A Working Model for Creative
Construction in L2 Acquisition
Internal Processing
Age
Personality
Learners Verbal Performance
Language Environment
Monitor
Organizer
Filter
First Language
55
Brain Compatible Teaching
56
(No Transcript)
57
(No Transcript)
58
Stages of Language Acquisition and Development in
the Child
Vocabulary Estimates of Vocabulary 1
year 3 words 2 years 272 words 3
years 896 words 4 years 1540 words 5
years 2072 words 6 years 2562 words By first
grade a child could possibly have an active
vocabulary of 5099 different words. Sentence
Length 18 months Usually 1 word length 28
months 2 3 words length 3.5
years Complete sentences averaging about 4
words in length, although capable of
producing occasional sentences that are 20
30 words. 5 6 years -The average sentence
is about 5 words in length. 9.5 years -The
oral sentence is about 6 7 words, with an
average written length of 11 words 15
years -About 17 words Adult -About 20
words
59
Levels of Language Acquistion
  • Pre-Production
  • Early Production
  • Speech Emergence
  • Intermediate Fluency
  • Advanced Fluency

60
Literacy Development Instructional Sequence
Intermediate Abilities
Emergent Literacy
Early Literacy
Preparation to Literacy
61
Cognitively Undemanding Communication
1st Quadrant
2nd Quadrant
Art, music, P.E., Face to Face conversation,
Visual clues, Simple directions
Telephone conversations, Written descriptions,
Graphic organizers,
Context Embedded Communication
Context Reduced Communication
3rd Quadrant
4th Quadrant
Reading a textbook, Explanation of abstract
concepts, Lectures with few illustrations, Writing
Demonstrations, Hands on learning, Social
Studies projects, Science experiments
Cognitively Demanding Communication
62
When you know Then you dont know When you
know You dont know Then you KNOW
63
Program Models for English Language Learners
64
Immersion
No instructional support is provided by a trained
specialist. This is NOT a program model, since it
is in non-compliance with federal standards as a
result of the Supreme Court decision in Lau vs.
Nichols.
65
English as a Second Language (ESL) No
instruction through the minority language.
  • PK-12
  • ESL Taught by a bilingual teacher in a self
    contained classroom, but all instruction is
    conducted through English.
  • ESL taught through academic content An English
    program that serves students identified as LEP in
    English only providing a full time teacher
    certified to provide supplementary instruction
    for all content area instruction it integrates
    English as a Second Language instruction, and
    Sheltered Instructional strategies with subject
    matter instruction which focuses not only on
    learning a second language, but using that
    language as a medium to learn math, science, and
    social studies, or other academic subjects.

66
Types of Bilingual/ESLPrograms
  • ESL Pullout is
  • an English program that serves identified LEP
    students in English only by providing a certified
    teacher for English language arts instruction
    exclusively, while the student remains in a
    mainstream instructional arrangement in the
    remaining content areas instruction my be
    provided by an ESL teacher in a pull-out or
    inclusdionalry delivery model exiting to an all
    English program of instruction will occur not
    earlier than the end of first grade, or if the
    student enrolls in school during or after first
    grade, the student will remain in the program for
    a minimum of two to five years before being
    eligible to exit the ESL program.

67
English as a Second Language (ESL) or English to
Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) contd
  • Secondary Education
  • ESL taught through academic content or sheltered
    English
  • ESL taught as a subject

68
Transitional Bilingual Programs  Transitional
bilingual/early exit  a bilingual program that
serves students identified as students of limited
English proficiency in both English and Spanish
and transfers a student to English-only
instruction not earlier than two or later than
five years after the student enrolls in school
Transitional bilingual/late exit  a bilingual
program that serves students identified as
students of limited English proficiency in both
English and Spanish and transfers a student to
English-only instruction not earlier than six or
later than seven years after the student enrolls
in school
69
Transitional Programs
PK L1 80
K L1 70
1st L1 50
2nd L1 50
3rd L1 20
4th 100 English
5th 100 English
L2 ESL 80
L2 ESL 50
L2 ESL 40
L2 ESL 30
L2 ELS 20
70
Two-way Immersion and One-Way Immersion are also
dual language programs.
71
Dual Language Programs
Dual language immersion/two-way  a biliteracy
program that integrates students proficient in
English and students identified as students of
limited English proficiency in both English and
Spanish and transfers a student identified as a
student of limited English proficiency to
English-only instruction not earlier than six or
later than seven years after the student enrolls
in school
72
Dual Language Programs
  • (D)  dual language immersion/one-way  a
    biliteracy program that serves only students
    identified as students of limited English
    proficiency in both English and Spanish and
    transfers a student to English-only instruction
    not earlier than six or later than seven years
    after the student enrolls in school and

73
The 50 50 Model (in Canada called partial
immersion)
  • Grades K 5 or 6 Academic instruction half a
    day
  • through each
    language.
  • Grades 6 0r 7 -12 60 of academic instruction
  • through majority
    language and
  • 40 through
    minority language.

74
50/50 MODELDual Language
PK L1 50
K L1 50
1st L1 50
2nd L1 50
3rd L1 50
4th L1 50
5th L1 50
L2 50 ESL
L2 50 ESL
L2 50 ESL
L2 50 ESL
L2 50 ESL
L2 50 ESL
L2 50 ESL
75
The 90 10 Model (in Canada, referred to as
early total immersion)
  • Grades K 1 All or 90 of academic instruction
    through minority

    language
  • Grade 2 One hour of academic instruction
    through majority language added.
  • Grade 3 Two hours of academic instruction
    through majority language added.
  • Grades 4-5 or 6 Academic instruction half a day
    through each language.
  • Grades 6 or 7-12 60 of academic instruction
    through majority language and 40
    through minority language.

76
90/10 MODEL Dual Language Model
PK L1 90
K L1 80
1st L1 70
2nd L1 60
3rd L1 50
4th L1 50
5th L1 50
50 ESL
50 ESL
50 ESL
L2 ESL 40
L2 ESL 30
L2 ESL 20
L2 ESL 10
77
(No Transcript)
78
Are these correct?
9 1 10 7 3 10 7 6 1 8 6 2 12 4
4 1 5 6
79
(No Transcript)
80
An Overview of the Texas Successful Schools
Studyas Conducted by the Texas Education
AgencyFebruary 2000
  • Study was conducted pursuant to a recommendation
    made in A Report to the 75th Texas Legislature
    from the Texas Education AgencyDecember 1996 and
    as part of the Commissioners Educational
    Research Initiative for 1998-99. The study
    started in March 1998.
  • Texas AM UniversityCorpus Christi provided the
    research support for the study.
  • Purpose of the study was to profile the programs,
    policies and instructional practices of
    successful schools.
  • Seven Schools were Selected from a group of 26
    Title I recognized schools in Texas with a high
    incidence of educationally disadvantaged
    students, a high incidence of LEP students, zero
    LEP exemptions on the state assessment (TAAS) and
    a rating of the Recognized or Exemplary on
    the Texas accountability system in May, 1997.

Contact Person Oscar M. Cardenas, Principal
Investigator at (512) 463-9714 ocardena_at_tmail.tea.
state.tx.us. The Study should be available for
public consumption at the Texas Education
Agencys web site at www.tea.state.tx.us/program.e
val/sss.html by mid-March, 2000.
81
TEA Accountability Ratings for Successful
Schools Study
Campus 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
Castaneda Recognized Recognized Recognized Exemplary Recognized
La Encantada Recognized Recognized Recognized Exemplary Recognized
Campestre Recognized Exemplary Exemplary Recognized Recognized
Kelly Recognized Recognized Recognized Exemplary Exemplary
Bowie Acceptable Recognized Exemplary Exemplary Exemplary
Clover Acceptable Recognized Recognized Exemplary Exemplary
Scott Exemplary Exemplary Exemplary Exemplary Exemplary
82
Successful Schools Accountability2001-2007
School 2001 2002 2004 2005 2006 2007
Castaneda Recog. Recog. Recog. Recog. Recog. Recog.
Kelly Exemp. Exemp. Recog. Recog. Recog. Recog.
Clover Exemp. Exemp Recog. Recog. Exemp. Recog.
Bowie Exemp. Recog. Exemp. Recog. Recog. Recog.
Scott Exemp. Exemp. Recog. Accept. Recog. Recog.
La Encantada Recog. Recog. Accept. Accept. Accept. Accept.
Campestre Recog. Accept. Accept. Accept. Recog. Accept.
83
Multiple Sources of Data
Campus Student TAAS Data
Interviews
Outcomes
AEIS Campus Reports
Surveys
Site Visits
84
Program Characteristics
  • Instructional leadership at both the campus and
    district levels.
  • Use of L1 and L2 in instruction-equal prestige of
    both languages.
  • No early exit from bilingual programs.
  • Literacy rich environments in both languages.

85
Program Characteristics (Continued)
  • Balanced literacy approaches.
  • Staff development focused on second language
    learners.
  • Vertical/horizontal team planning.
  • Thematic unit instruction with TAAS objectives
    and TEKS imbedded.

86
Program Characteristics (Continued)
  • Extensive parental involvement.
  • Social capitol John Coleman-students feel
  • valued and respected.
  • Culture infused throughout the curriculum through
    fine arts, literature, and social studies.
  • Continuous monitoring and assessment of language
    and academic growth.

87
Program Characteristics(Continued)
  • Technology for support/tutoring.
  • After school enrichment programs/tutoring.
  • Certified teachers and administrators.
  • Grouping for instruction.

88
Program Characteristics(Continued)
  • Montessori methodology in Early
  • Childhood.
  • Manipulatives and hands on
  • teaching.
  • Sustained silent reading.
  • Strong ESL methodologies.

89
EFFECTIVE DUAL LANGUAGE PRACTICES
90
Research Study
  • University research grant provided by Texas AM
    University-Corpus Christi. Eight (8) schools/five
    (5) states included in study
  • Albuquerque, New Mexico Independent School
    District
  • East San Jose Elementary School
  • Chicago, Illinois Independent School District
  • Darwin Elementary School
  • Rachel Carson Elementary School
  • Josiah L. Pickard Elementary School
  • Anderson Elementary School
  • Inter-American Magnet School
  • El Paso, Texas Independent School District
  • Alicia Chacón Elementary School

91
Research Study (continued)
  • Cauntillo, Texas Independent School District
  • Cauntillo Elementary
  • Jose Damian Elementary
  • Houston, Texas Independent School District
  • Gary L. Herod Elementary School
  • Arlington, Virginia Independent School District
  • Francis Scott Key Elementary School
  • Hidalgo, Texas Independent School District
  • Kelly Elementary School
  • Napa, California Independent School District
  • Napa Language Academy

92
Campus Leadership Practices
  • Campus leadership committed to bilingualism and
    bilingual education.
  • Administrator learned research and applied
    program 1st year/one grade, 2nd year two
    grades, etc.
  • Administrator informs community.
  • Administrator keeps school in district eye with
    representation at board meetings and other
    district functions.

93
Campus Leadership Practices(continued)
  • Administrator ensures compatible planning
    partners, administrator facilitates/schedules
    sufficient time for planning.
  • Administrator allows time for both vertical and
    horizontal team planning.
  • Administrator facilitates parent attendance,
    transportation to training.
  • Administrator protects the integrity of program,
    i.e. no new 4th graders added, etc.

94
Campus Leadership Practices(continued)
  • Administrator treats teachers as participants
    teachers are invested and empowered.
  • Administrator facilitated smooth program
    implementation with parent support after staff
    and community disagreed on which program model to
    implement (50/50 or 90/10).
  • Administrator facilitates staff training and
    development (staff in-service/attendance to NABE,
    CABE, etc.).
  • Administrator is committed to program staffing (a
    key to program success).

95
Program Characteristics
  • Spanish as L2 instruction for all students (SFL
    immersion program).
  • Spanish literacy integrated through content.
  • Program phased in gradually.
  • High level of development of Spanish language use
    required by bilingual teachers to facilitate
    production.
  • Planned and practiced student presentations in L1
    and L2 for all students.

96
Program Characteristics(continued)
  • No one model of implementation was prevalent
    among the schools visited but whatever the model
    it was respected.
  • Team teaching is used with teachers working in
    their area of expertise or preferred language.
  • Clear language division one (1) day English/ one
    (1) day Spanish or other appropriate models were
    observed.
  • Program begins with Prekindergarten level.
  • Teacher preparation and planning facilitates
    stability of program.

97
Program Characteristics(continued)
  • Heterogeneous grouping for instruction.
  • Administrators, teachers, and staff believe in
    children as language learners.
  • Some language pairing in environmental literacy.
  • Tutoring before or after school at least twice
    weekly.
  • Continuous assessment of language development in
    both languages.

98
Program Characteristics(continued)
  • Continuous assessment of program goals and
    outcomes.
  • Adequate materials in both English and Spanish
    languages.
  • Certified administrators and bilingual teachers.
  • Adequate library materials in both English and
    Spanish.
  • Support staff is also supportive of dual language
    program.

99
PROMISING PROGRAMS IN SECONDARY LANGUAGE MINORITY
EDUCATION(_at_ W.P. Thomas V. P. Collier, 1995)
For students entering U.S. schools at secondary
level, when first language support cannot be
provided, the following program characteristics
make a significant difference
  • Second language taught through academic content
  • Conscious focus on teaching learning strategies
    needed to develop thinking skills and
    problem-solving
  • Activation of students prior knowledge
  • Respect for students home language and culture
  • Cooperative learning
  • Interactive, discovery learning
  • Intense, meaningful cognitive/academic
    development
  • Ongoing assessment using multiple measures

An example of this type of program is CALLA The
Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach
100
SIOP(Sheltered Instruction Observation
Protocol)A Model of Sheltered
Instruction(Short, Echevarria, 2002)
  • Identify the language demands of the content
    course.
  • Plan language objectives for all lessons and make
    them explicit to students.
  • Emphasize academic vocabulary development.
  • Activate and strengthen background knowledge.
  • Promote oral interaction and extended academic
    talk.
  • Review vocabulary and content concepts.
  • Give students feedback on language use in class.

101
Synthesis of Research on Academic Achievement of
English Language Learners
  • Dr. Kathryn Lindholm-Leary
  • Dr. Graciela Bersanto
  • AERA-Montreal, Canada
  • April, 2005

102
Academic achievement
  • Communicative competence in acquiring
  • content and achievement as measured in math,
    science, and social studies.
  • Most studies focused on underachievement.
  • Most used assessment was a standardized
    achievement test.

103
Research Design
  • Original search produced 700 articles/studies
  • Narrowed to 200 articles
  • Focused on findings of 66 empirical articles
  • Majority of articles dealt with programs.
  • Focused on program evaluations
  • Some assessment issues

104
Research Design continued
  • 2 types of studies-Comparative studies
  • Bilingual vs. ESL Early Exit vs. Late Exit
  • and Descriptive studies-Describe the outcomes
    of special programs for ELLs.
  • Elementary level, a few secondary studies
  • Few longitudinal studies

105
Does research demonstrate the effectiveness of
programs designed for Ells as compared to
mainstream programs ?
  • Programs specifically designed for ELLs
  • produce students equal to and in many
  • cases surpass students in the mainstream
  • program.
  • Most programs evaluated through 2nd grade. Most
    programs show little difference in early grades,
    but looking at the later grades, students catch
    up and surpass mainstream students.

106
SYNTHESIS FINDINGS CONTINUED
  • Students are less likely to drop out of school if
    they are in specifically designed programs.
  • Students who received instruction in L1 were most
    likely to close the achievement gap and surpass
    their mainstream peers.
  • Students had positive attitudes toward self and
    other students.
  • Students had positive attitudes toward their
    culture and other cultures.

107
Characteristics Common to Effective Programs
  • Attitude that All Children Can Learn.
  • Positive school environment.
  • Challenging and meaningful curriculum.
  • Alignment of curriculum to high standards.
  • Administrators and teachers that know
  • and understand theory and goals of program and
    implement best practices for ELLs.

108
Characteristics Common to Effective Programs
  • Integrate rather than segregate students.
  • See the program as an enrichment model.
  • Program is sustained over time.
  • Consistent assessment of literacy and
  • academic development.
  • Language development strategies are incorporated
    into the program.

109
Conclusions
  • English language learners are more successful
    when they participate in programs specifically
    designed to meet their needs.
  • Programs need to be consistent.
  • Programs need to be viewed as enrichment.
  • Programs incorporate language development.
  • Appropriate assessments are conducted.
  • An enriched and challenging curriculum is
    provided.

110
Questions to Consider
  • What does the research tell me?
  • What was not so surprising to me?
  • What was somewhat surprising to me?
  • What is totally surprising to me?
  • Knowing the research, what changes/considerations/
    policies do we provide so that our students have
    a successful future?

111
ONE
As the soot and dirt and ash rained down, We
became one color. As we carried each other down
the stairs of the burning building We became one
class. As we lit candles of waiting and hope We
became one generation. As the firefighters and
police officers fought their way into the
inferno We became one gender. As we fell to our
knees in prayer for strength, We became one
faith. As we whispered or shouted words of
encouragement, We spoke one language. As we gave
our blood in lines a mile long, We became one
body. As we mourned together the great loss We
became one family. As we cried tears of grief and
loss We became one soul. As we retell with pride
of the sacrifice of heroes We become one people.
112
We are One color One class One generation One
gender One faith One body One family One soul One
people We are The Power of One. We are United We
are America.
Ed Jody Lippincott
113
Dr. Frank Lucido, Director Institute for Second
Language Achievement flucido_at_falcon.tamucc.edu htt
p//ell.tamucc..edu (ISLA website) Consultants Dr.
Gustavo Gonzalez Dr. Lupita Thompson Dr.
Candelario Huerta Mrs. Cecilia Huerta Dr. Elva
Cerda Perez
About PowerShow.com