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Heneghan and Associates GENERAL SAFETY TRAINING and EMERGENCY ACTION PLANS

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Title: Heneghan and Associates GENERAL SAFETY TRAINING and EMERGENCY ACTION PLANS


1
Heneghan and AssociatesGENERAL SAFETY TRAINING
and EMERGENCY ACTION PLANS
2
SAFETY IS A RIGHT NOT A PRIVILEGE.
3
Employees Rights and Responsibilitiesunder
O.S.H.A.
The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970
(OSH Act) is the federal law that established the
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA), the federal agency responsible for
ensuring workplace safety. The law and OSHAs
standards specify what employers must do to make
sure employees safety and health are protected.
They also require employees to follow all OSHA
rules that apply to them.
I want you to go home in the afternoon,in the
same condition you came to work this
morning. Andy Macias
4
Employees Rights and Responsibilitiesunder
O.S.H.A.
  • Purpose of OSHA
  • OSHAs Goals
  • OSHAs Standards
  • OSHA Inspections
  • Employees Rights and Responsibilities
  • Purpose of Safety Training
  • Reporting and Recordkeeping
  • Employees Right to Information
  • OSHA Poster
  • OSHA is Safety and Health Partner

5
What O.S.H.A. Requires
The General Duty clause of the OSHA rules
requires employers to provide a place of
employment that is free from recognized hazards
that may cause death or serious physical harm
and further requires all employees to comply with
all OSHA rules and standards that apply to their
actions and conduct.
1. Understand and follow the OSHA rules that
apply to you.2. Recognize and report safety
hazards in the workplace.
6
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7
Accidents hurt - safety doesn't.While on a
ladder, never step back to admire your work.  
Hearing protection is a sound investment. To
learn about eye protection, ask someone who has
one.  Over 5,000 Americans die from
on-the-job accidents every year and a worker
is injured every 19 seconds.
8
There is one key to SAFETY only YOU can
controlYour Safety Attitude.
9
Poor Safety Habits Can Trip You Up!
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration
estimates 40,000 office workers sustain disabling
injuries each year, and that 200 of these
injuries are fatal. In addition, there are
countless cases of back injuries, bruises, and
skin rashes that are not reported, many of them
because they are not considered a direct result
of unsafe office environments. A conservative
estimate is that more than 100,000,000 is lost
annually in medical and workers' compensation
costs due to office-related injuries. Office
safety is an important aspect of workplace safety
and should not be considered trivial.    The
leading causes of disabling office accidents are
slips and falls, strains, overexertion, falling
objects, and workers striking objects or being
caught in or between objects. Other hazards
include electrical equipment and wiring, and
fires.
10
Poor Safety Habits Can Trip You Up!
  • Lost Work Time.
  • Painful injuries and death.
  • Productivity losses.
  • Needless expense.

- A Safe Attitude is a Habit and a Way of Life -
11
Safe Safety Habits Can Lift You Up!
Here are four reasons for maintaining a safe
workplaceSafety sustains productivity,
promotes morale, is required by law, and requires
everyones participation.
- A Safe Attitude is a Habit and a Way of Life -
12
WORK STATIONS
13
WORK STATIONS
  • Designed to reduce excessive bending and
    stretching.
  • Good housekeeping is essential.
  • Never store items under your desk.
  • Never store loose items on top of cabinets or
    cupboards.
  • Never leave desk and/or filing cabinet drawers
    open.

14
CHAIRS AND DESKS
15
CHAIRS AND DESKS
  • Good lower back support
  • Adjustable knees and hips are level.
  • Chairs on castors must have five legs
  • If your desk is too high, compensate by raising
    the seat of your chair.
  • Never stand on the chair to reach anything,
    particularly if the chair has wheels or is a
    swivel chair!

16
COMPUTER MONITOR
17
COMPUTER MONITOR
  • The top of the monitor should be at eye level to
    avoid neck strain.
  • The keyboard should be directly in front of the
    user.
  • The users elbows should be bent at a 90 degree
    angle.
  • The back of the keyboard should be slightly
    elevated to allow the users wrists to be in a
    neutral position
  • The screen should be positioned at right angles
    to the window to avoid glare.

18
COMPUTER MONITOR
  • A badly positioned computer not only makes the
    user unproductive, it also causes discomfort.
  • If the monitor is badly positioned the user will
    probably suffer eyestrain, headaches, stiff neck
    and shoulders, and backache.
  • The monitor should be placed directlyin front of
    the user to optimize visual range.
  • The screen should be 15 to 24 inchesaway from
    the users eyes, roughlyarms length away.

19
OFFICE LIGHTING
20
OFFICE LIGHTING
  • Your office lighting must be sufficient to
    decrease eye strain.
  • Strive to eliminate glare and reflection from
    your monitors screen.

21
FILING CABINETS
22
FILING CABINETS
  • Close the drawers!

23
FILING CABINETS
  • Close the drawers!
  • Dont open all the drawers at the same time

24
FILING CABINETS
  • Close the drawers!
  • Dont open all the drawers at the same time
  • Use the handle to close the drawer

25
FILING CABINETS
  • Close the drawers!
  • Dont open all the drawers at the same time
  • Use the handle to close the drawer

26
OFFICE MACHINES
27
OFFICE MACHINES
  • Learn how to operate them safely before you use
    them
  • Loose clothing, jewelry, long flowing hair to be
    kept out of machines.
  • Keep hands and fingers clear of paper inlet at
    the shredder.
  • Switch the machine off before trying to clear a
    blockage.

28
OFFICE MACHINES
  • If you notice a tingling sensation when touching
    a machine or see smoke or sparks unplug it
    immediately and report it!
  • Put a sign on the machine indicating to others
    that it is out of order!

29
STACKING AND STORAGE
30
STACKING AND STORAGE
  • Light objects stored on top and heavy objects in
    the bottom - also in filing cabinets.
  • Boxes, files and other heavy articles must not be
    stacked on top of cabinets, cupboards or window
    sills.
  • Keep passages clear and fire fighting equipment
    unobstructed.

31
ELECTRICAL SAFEGUARDING
32
ELECTRICAL SAFEGUARDING
  • Cables!!!!!!
  • Loose lying cables can cause a tripping hazard
  • Electrocution
  • People can hook on cables and pull expensive
    equipment from tables
  • They are untidy
  • It is your responsibility to get them organized
    and prevent a mishap!

33
ELECTRICAL SAFEGUARDING
  • No unauthorized person may tamper with any
    electrical appliance or distribution board.
  • Do not overload sockets. Ask for an additional
    outlet to be installed.
  • If an electrical cable becomes warm to the touch,
    it must be disconnected and reported without
    delay.
  • Cable and extension cords should not be run
    unprotected beneath carpeting nor should they
    span walkways without being secured in an
    encapsulation device.

34
ELECTRICAL SAFEGUARDING
  • Conduct regular safety inspections to identify
    potentially hazardous work conditions or unsafe
    work practices, but even frequent inspections
    cant detect every danger. You should know your
    work area better than anyone else. 
  • Do carry out your own visual inspections of plugs
    and leads and get them repaired as necessary.
  • Look out for
  • Physical damage to the cable
  • Damage to the plugs
  • Insecure connections to the plug
  • Do switch off equipment before unplugging and
    before cleaning

35
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36
ACCIDENT REPORTING
  • Report all work-related injuries to Mary Blotna
    on the same day the injury occurs.

37
BACK INJURIES
38
BACK INJURIES
39
ABOUT THE BACK
The spine consists of irregularly shaped bones,
called vertebrae. Discs are spaced between each
vertebra to preserve the spacing for joints and
nerves. Just like other joints, vertebral joints
are supported by ligaments. The abdominal
muscles and the muscles adjacent to the spine
provide our spine positioning during all
activity. Improper lifting or working techniques
can injure one or more of these spinal tissues. 
40
BACK INJURIES
Stress -Whether its a result of a job, family,
friends or a circumstance, stress plays a major
role in our every day life. -When this negative
energy builds up mentally and/or emotionally it
can impact the body physically especially in
weakened areas of the body. -For some people it
is the muscles of their back or neck, and for
others it can affect internal organs.
-Excessive stress affects our bodies and can
cause chronic misalignments in the spine and
joints of the body.
  • Stress
  • Slow
  • Long term effect
  • Strains
  • Acute

41
BACK INJURIES
  • Stress
  • Slow
  • Long term effect
  • Strains
  • Acute
  • Reduced mobility

42
BACK INJURIES
  • Stress
  • Slow
  • Long term effect
  • Strains
  • Acute
  • Reduced mobility
  • Reduced involvement at work

43
BACK INJURIES
  • Stress
  • Slow
  • Long term effect
  • Strains
  • Acute
  • Reduced mobility
  • Reduced involvement at work
  • Reduced productivity

44
  • Safe Lifting Techniques
  • There are several basic rules of lifting and
    moving that can help prevent back injuries
  • Lift with your legs, not your back this is
    because your legs muscles are larger and better
    positioned over the hips and knees to provide
    this activity.
  • Do not twist instead, always position your hips
    and feet toward the object you are lifting or
    moving.
  • Maintain the natural curves of the neck, upper
    back and lower back while lifting, moving, and
    even sitting.
  • Keep objects close to your body this reduces the
    leverage on your spine.
  • Push, rather than pull when possible. Pushing
    naturally places your legs in a position to do
    the work whereas pulling naturally places your
    back in a forward bent position.

45
BACK INJURIES
46
BACK INJURIES
47
  • Back Injury Prevention Safety Techniques
  • Size up the load. Is it manageable, or will this
    task take two?
  • Inspect the route where the load will be carried.
    Especially look for tripping hazards and adequate
    room to maneuver safely.
  • Clean off greasy, wet, or dirty items before
    lifting. Keep your hands free of anything that
    will prevent a firm grasp, such as, oil, or
    ragged gloves.
  • Bend with your knees keeping your back straight.
    Get a firm grasp on the load, and make sure to
    have a solid footing before beginning.
  • Once you lift the load, keep it close to your
    body. Keep fingers away from edges where pinches
    may occur. This is especially important when
    carrying through doors, or when setting a load
    down.
  • Create and maintain ease of access to piles or
    stacks of materials. When piling or stacking
    materials, make sure one level is resting
    securely on the one below it. Use proper
    blocking when necessary and never exceed a safe
    height. Report any unsafe stacks to your
    supervisor.

48
SLIPS, TRIPS AND FALLS
49
SLIPS, TRIPS AND FALLS
  • Prevent them by remembering the following
  • Do not allow cabling to create a tripping hazard
  • Clear up spillages quickly
  • Do not block passageways
  • Keep office areas clean
  • Keep stacking and storage areas safe

50
SLIPS, TRIPS AND FALLS
Watch out for Worn or loose carpets Broken stair
tread edges Chipped floorboards and tiles Watch
where you walk! Wear high heels with
care! Remember to pick up objects that fall
pencils, pens, etc.
51
STAIRS
52
STAIRS
  • Avoid distraction on stairs
  • Only take one step at a time
  • Dont load your arms so full of materials
    that you cant see
  • Keep one hand on the handrail

53
STAIRS
54
LADDERS
55
LADDERS
Each year there are 360 fatalities and 151,327
reported injuries caused by falls from ladders.
Most ladder accidents are the result of careless
or improper ladder use.  It is important that
you  follow the safe practices set out in this
module every time you use a ladder.
56
LADDERS
Here are a few slides demonstrating what NOT to
do with ladders.
57
LADDERS
Do not continue until you get the right equipment
to do the job safely. Lets face it its not
exactly rocket science, is it?
58
LADDERS
How to trim a dead branch... Thankfully, all
four tree trimmers survived without injury - this
time.
59
LADDERS
Our lunacy with ladders collection just keeps
growing! This is further proof that there are
virtually no limits to the ways you can misuse
and abuse ladders.
60
LADDERS
What ever works!
is not always the RIGHTanswer! Use the correct
ladder for the job at hand!
61
LADDERS
Step Ladder Platform Ladder Extension Ladder
Trestle Ladder
  • Ladders are of different types, work in different
    ways, and are designed for specific tasks
  • Step ladders are self-supporting portable ladders
    that do not adjust in length.
  • Platform ladders are for special purposes and
    have a large stable platform from which you can
    work while standing.
  • Extension ladders are not self-supporting and are
    adjustable in length.
  • Trestle ladders are self-supporting ladders that
    are not adjustable in length, and have two hinged
    sections at the top so the legs form equal angels
    at the ladders base.

62
LADDERS
Step Ladder Platform Ladder Extension Ladder
Trestle Ladder
  • Ascending and Descending the Ladder
  • To safely go up and down ladders, you must
  • Face the ladder at all times.
  • Grasp the side rails with both hands.
  • Keep your body between the side rails of the
    ladder.
  • Never climb higher than the third rung from the
    top on a straight or extension ladder,
  • or the second tread from the top on a
    stepladder.
  • Raise and lower heavy, awkward loads with a hand
    line or hoist.
  • Attach light, compact tools or materials to the
    ladder or to yourself.
  • Use the three point rule.

63
LADDERS
Not every job can be done with just a ladder - or
by you on your own.  So always check Are YOU up
to the job? Don't kid yourself by overestimating
your abilities.  If you're not completely certain
that you can manage everything involved in doing
the job properly, get professional help.  This is
particularly important if you are elderly or not
fully fit, or not much good with heights - think
about getting someone else to do it for you. Is
a LADDER up to the job? Think ahead to what
you'll have to do at every stage.  If you will
need to move around while you're up there, or
carry lots of materials, or use heavy equipment,
a ladder may not be sufficient.  You might be
better off using a mobile tower or
scaffolding. Remember - if you don't know - ask
a PRO.
64
LADDERS
IS IT SAFE ENOUGH? Run this quick check on any
ladder you're thinking of buying, hiring or
using. General condition sound? (clean dry,
free from wet paint, oil, mud, etc). No cracks?
No rungs missing or loose? Not painted? No
stiles damaged or bent? No warping or splitting?
(timber) No corrosion? (metal) No sharp edges
or dents? (metal) No rungs bent? (metal)
Footpads OK? Caps/rubber fittings OK? All
metal ladders should have slip-resistant rubber
or plastic feet. Damaged ladders need
professional repairing - or more likely,
replacing. Ladders should never be painted as
this could hide dangerous defects from view.  A
timber ladder can be protected with clear varnish
or transparent rot-sealant.
65
Personal Protective Equipment(PPE)
66
What is PPE?
67
Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) is required
when you work to increase your safety while
performing potentially hazardous tasks. PPE may
include safety glasses or goggles, dust masks,
hard harts, gloves, foot protection, and whole
body protection.
68
PPE Program
First -- assess the workplace to determine if
hazards are present, or are likely to be present,
which necessitate the use of PPE Second --
Includes procedures for selecting, providing and
using PPE Third -- After selecting PPE, provide
training to employees who are required to use it.
69
Personal Protective Equipment(PPE)
Body Part Protection
70
PPE Training
If employees are required to use PPE, train them
  • Why it is necessary
  • How it will protect them
  • What are its limitations
  • When and how to wear
  • How to identify signs of wear
  • How to clean and disinfect
  • What is its useful life how is it disposed

71
Head Protection
72
Causes of Head Injuries
  • Falling objects such as tools
  • Bumping head against objects, such as pipes or
    beams
  • Contact with exposed electrical wiring or
    components

73
Why Head Protection is Important
Your head is a very delicate part of your body.
In and around your head are Your eyes, with
which you see. Your ears, with which you hear
Your nose, with which you smell Your mouth,
with which you eat and speak Your brain, with
which you think. Injuries to the head are very
serious so use your Head and wear your hard hat.
It might just save your life today...
74
How Hard Hats Protect You
Hard hats protect you by providing the following
features A rigid shell that resists and
deflects blows to the head. A suspension system
inside the hat that acts as a shock absorber.
Some hats serve as an insulator against
electrical shocks. Shields your scalp, face,
neck, and shoulders against splashes, spills, and
drips. Some hard hats can be modified so you
can add face shields, goggles, hoods, or hearing
protection to them.
75
Safety Helmet Responsibilities The need for
safety helmets to be worn on construction sites
should be established by the person in control,
conducting a hazard assessment.1. Employers are
responsible for ensuring that a safety helmet is
worn on a construction site where-- There is a
possibility that a person may be struck on the
head by a falling object.-- A person may strike
their head against a fixed or protruding
object.-- Accidental head contact may be made
with electrical hazards.2. Every person on a
construction site should wear a safety
helmet-- Where there is a risk of a head
injury.-- If required to do so by an employer
and/or the person in control of the
workplace.NOTE It is Compulsory to Wear a
Safety Helmet When Carrying Out Demolition Work.
Construction Safety Regulation 84(32).All
safety helmets worn on construction sites should
conform with the requirements of AS1801 -
Industrial Safety Helmets and be maintained in
accordance with AS1800 - The Selection, Care and
Use of Industrial Safety Helmets
76
Head Injuries
  • This hard hat saved a life.

77
Eye Protection
78
When must Eye Protection be Provided?
  • When any of these hazards are present
  • Dust and other flying particles, such as metal
    shavings or sawdust
  • Corrosive gases, vapors, and liquids
  • Molten metal that may splash
  • Potentially infectious materials such as blood or
    hazardous liquid chemicals that may splash
  • Intense light from welding and lasers

79
Eye ProtectionCriteria for Selection
  • Protects against specific hazard(s)
  • Comfortable to wear
  • Does not restrict vision or movement
  • Durable and easy to clean and disinfect
  • Does not interfere with the function of other
    required PPE

80
Eye Protection for EmployeesWho Wear Eyeglasses
  • Ordinary glasses do not provide the required
    protection
  • Proper choices include
  • Prescription glasses with side shields and
    protective lenses
  • Goggles that fit comfortably over corrective
    glasses without disturbing the glasses
  • Goggles that incorporate corrective lenses
    mounted behind protective lenses

81
Safety Glasses
  • Made with metal/plastic safety frames
  • Most operations require side shields
  • Used for moderate impact from particles produced
    by jobs such as carpentry, woodworking, grinding,
    and scaling

82
Goggles
  • Protects eyes and area around the eyes from
    impact, dust, and splashes
  • Some goggles fit over corrective lenses

83
EYES
  • Dont rub your eyes if you have a chemical on
    your hands.
  • Keep eyes away from corner cabinets, boxes, and
    pencils, etc.
  • Poor vision needs professional attention.

84
EYES
85
Hearing Protection
86
Hearing Protection
A deciBel is a unit of measurement of the
loudness or strength of a signal. One deciBel is
considered the smallest difference in sound level
that the human ear can discern. Created in the
early days of telephony as a way to measure cable
and equipment performance and named after
Alexander Graham Bell, deciBels (dBs) are a
relative measurement derived from two signal
levels a reference input level and an observed
output level. A deciBel is the logarithm of the
ratio of the two levels. One Bel is when the
output signal is 10x that of the input, and one
deciBel is 1/10th of a Bel. A whisper is about
20 dB. A normal conversation is typically from 60
to 70 dB, and a noisy factory from 90 to 100 dB.
Loud thunder is approximately 110 dB, and 120 dB
borders on the threshold of pain.
87
Hearing Protection
Hazardous Noise Sounds louder than 80 decibels
are considered potentially dangerous. Both the
amount of noise and the length of time of
exposure determine the amount of damage. Hair
cells of the inner ear and the hearing nerve can
be damaged by an intense brief impulse, like an
explosion, or by continuous and/or repeated
exposure to noise. Examples of noise levels
considered dangerous by experts are a lawnmower,
a rock concert, firearms, firecrackers, headset
listening systems, motorcycles, tractors,
household appliances (garbage disposals,
blenders, food processors/choppers, etc.) and
noisy toys. All can deliver sound over 90
decibels and some up to 140 decibels.
88
Hearing Protection
Can't my ears "adjust" and "get used" to regular
noise? If you think you have "gotten used to"
the noise you are routinely exposed to, then most
likely you have already suffered damage and have
acquired a permanent hearing loss. Don't be
fooled by thinking your ears are "tough" or that
you have the ability to "tune it out"! Noise
induced hearing loss is usually gradual and
painless, but, unfortunately, permanent. Once
destroyed, the hearing nerve and its sensory
nerve cells do not regenerate!
89
Hearing Protection
Examples of various dB levels
90
Hearing Protection
Painful 150 dB rock music peak 140 dB
firearms, air raid siren, jet engine 130 dB
jackhammer 120 dB jet plane take-off, amplified
rock music at 4-6 ft., car stereo, band
practice Extremely loud 110 dB rock music,
model airplane 106 dB timpani and bass drum
rolls 100 dB snowmobile, chain saw, pneumatic
drill 90 dB lawnmower, shop tools, truck
traffic, subway Very loud 80 dB alarm
clock, busy street 70 dB busy traffic,
vacuum cleaner 60 dB conversation,
dishwasher Moderate 50 dB moderate
rainfall 40 dB quiet room Faint 3
0 dB whisper, quiet library
91
Hearing Protection
  • Noise not only affects hearing. It affects other
    parts of the body and body systems .
  • It is now known that noise
  • Increases blood pressure
  • Has negative cardiovascular effects such as
    changing the way the heart beats
  • Increases breathing rate
  • Disturbs digestion
  • Can cause an upset stomach or ulcer
  • Can negatively impact a developing fetus, perhaps
    contributing to premature birth
  • Makes it difficult to sleep, even after the noise
    stops
  • Intensifies the effects of factors like drugs,
    alcohol, aging and carbon monoxide
  • Research is on-going and continues to provide
    data suggesting the devastating effects of noise
    on health. Research is also investigating factors
    that may contribute to one's susceptibility to
    noise induced hearing loss.

92
Hearing Protection
  • When its not feasible to reduce the noise or
  • its duration use ear protective devices!
  • Ear protective devices must be fitted!

93
When Must Hearing Protection be Provided?
  • After implementing engineering and work practice
    controls at your job site or work station.
  • When an employees noise exposure exceeds an
    8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) sound level
    of 90 dBA.

94
Examples of Hearing Protectors
Banded Hearing Protectors
Earmuffs
Earplugs
95
Examples of Hearing Protectors
Earmuffs
Ear Muffs cover and seal the entire ear.
Sometimes worn in conjunction with plugs in high
noise areas.
96
Examples of Hearing Protectors
Ear Plugs are made from a variety of materials,
and are positioned in the ear canal. Can be
reusable or disposable and are available corded
or un-corded. Designs include a simple canister
shape and double or triple flanged models. A wide
variety of colors aid in monitoring use and
worker acceptance.
Earplugs
97
Examples of Hearing Protectors
Banded Hearing Protectors
Banded Hearing Protectors have flexible headbands
for a comfortable seal. Offers several degrees of
insertion for different levels of protection.
Bright colors ensure easy compliance checks.
98
Hand Protection
99
When Must Hand Protection be Provided?
When any of these are present
  • Burns
  • Bruises
  • Abrasions
  • Cuts
  • Punctures
  • Fractures
  • Amputations
  • Chemical Exposures

100
What Kinds of Protective Gloves are Available?
  • Durable gloves made of metal mesh, leather, or
    canvas
  • Protects from cuts, burns, heat
  • Fabric and coated fabric gloves
  • Protects from dirt and abrasion
  • Chemical and liquid resistant gloves
  • Protects from burns, irritation, and dermatitis
  • Rubber gloves
  • Protects from cuts, lacerations, and abrasions

101
This is my hand!
  • Look after your hands!
  • Be careful when you stick them into your desk
    drawers.
  • Be careful when you handle papers and staplers.
  • Keep sharp objects in safe containers.

102
This is my hand!
  • Pick up broken glass with a broom and dust pan
  • Wrap the glass in thick paper and mark it so that
    the cleaning staff will know what it is.
  • Slivers of glass should be picked up with a damp
    paper towel - discard paper towel

103
Respiratory Protection
104
Respiratory Protection
Respirators function by filtering or purifying
contaminated air, or by supplying fresh air from
an outside source and are available in wide
variety for specific tasks.
Types of Respirators
Filtration Respirator
Air-Purifying Respirator
Air-Supplying Respirator
105
Respiratory Protection
Filtration Respirator
Air-Purifying Respirator
Air-Supplying Respirator
Filtration respirators filter or "screen" out
contaminants from the air you breathe. Filtration
masks guard against airborne particles (such as
dust) and some gases and vapors. Once the filter
becomes discolored or "clogged" you must replace
it. These respirators or dust masks have a molded
nose bridge that maintains seal without a metal
band and has straps securely attached.  They are
lightweight and used for general industrial
applications. They are not recommended for
asbestos or sandblasting. Purifying respirators
contain replaceable chemical cartridges or
canisters that "purify" or entrap the contaminant
before you breathe it. (These respirators may
also contain filtration devices.) Cartridges are
color-coded depending on the particular hazard
they guard against. You must receive specialized
training in respirator use before you use a air
purifying respirator. Air-supplying (also called
supplied-air) respirators provide clean air from
an outside source when there is an inadequate or
highly-contaminated supply of oxygen. You must
receive specialized training in respirator use
before you use air-supplying respirator. Any
employee who is required to wear purifying and
air-supplying respirators must complete
specialized training in respirator use.
106
Summary
Employers must implement a PPE program where they
  • Assess the workplace for hazards.
  • Use engineering and work practice controls to
    eliminate or reduce hazards before using PPE.
  • Select appropriate PPE to protect employees from
    hazards that cannot be eliminated.
  • Inform employees why the PPE is necessary, how
    and when it must be worn.
  • Train employees how to use and care for their
    PPE, including how to recognize deterioration and
    failure.
  • Require employees to wear selected PPE.

107
Emergency Action Plan
108
Number 1 Rule!!!
109
KEEP YOUR HEAD!
DO NOT PANICDURING AN EMERGENCY!
110
KNOW HOW TO REPORT AN EMERGENCY!USE CORRECT
PROCEDURE AND NOTIFY RESPONSIBLE KEY PERSONNEL
WITHOUT DELAY!
  • Remain calm. Before picking up the phone, take a
    deep breath and do your best to relax.
  • Pick up the phone, listen for dial tone, then
    dial 9-1-1.
  • When the dispatcher answers, simply state what
    you need i.e., I need an ambulance.
  • The dispatcher will ask for the address or
    location of the emergency. This is very
    important! Mark the address by each telephone.
  • Next, the dispatcher will ask you exactly what is
    wrong - the "details" of your emergency. This is
    important information too! Do not become upset
    that it is "taking too long", or that "they are
    asking too many questions". Remember, while one
    dispatcher is talking to you on the phone,
    another dispatcher is putting your call out on
    radio to the emergency personnel. Keep in mind
    that these questions are necessary in order to
    provide the best course of action for your
    situation.
  • The 911 dispatcher's job is stressful and very
    difficult, so try not to yell, use profanity or
    be discourteous. If you feel any emergency
    personnel have treated you unfairly or
    unprofessionally, you have a right to file a
    complaint with their agency.
  • Finally, the dispatcher will ask your name and
    telephone number.
  • Answer all questions honestly, directly, and
    quickly. Do not embellish or fabricate
    information because you think it may accomplish a
    faster response. Reporting a false emergency or
    misuse of 911 is a crime and you may
    inadvertently prevent someone else from obtaining
    emergency assistance.
  • DO NOT hang up until the dispatcher says it is
    okay to do so.
  • Follow any instructions given you by the 911
    dispatcher, unless doing so would put yourself or
    others in danger.

111
KNOW HOW TO REPORT AN EMERGENCY!USE CORRECT
PROCEDURE AND NOTIFY RESPONSIBLE KEY PERSONNEL
WITHOUT DELAY!
Use the phone!Make the INTERCOMannouncementto
all office personnel!
IF your office has one,sound the alarm!
How does your office make an emergency
announcement?
112
FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS!
Stay at workplace and adhere to any instructions
that are given.
113
KNOW THE EXITS!ENSURE EASY ACCESS TO THE
SAFEST WAY OUT!
114
PREVENT CHAOS!
Do not run, but walk as rapidly as possible to
the nearest exit (or as instructed)
115
Emergency Action Plan EXAMPLE
Your Office Evacuation Plan Layout will show the
Primary and Secondary Exits and the Assembly area.
116
Emergency Action Plan
117
Emergency Action Plan
Your Office Evacuation Plan Layout inGodfrey,
Columbia, and Centralia!
118
  • GUESS WHO
  • IS
  • RESPONSIBLE
  • FOR YOUR
  • SAFETY???

119
YOU are responsible for your SAFETY!!
120
FIRST AID BOX
  • Make sure you know where the box is.
  • Ensure the box is well stocked.
  • Do you know the emergency phone number for help?

121
Watch out for unsafe Conditions!
Report them!
122
Housekeeping is the Key!
RONNIEPAUL
123
Protect Your Back!
Use correct Lifting methods! Bend your Knees!
124
Dont Take Chances!
Dont work on electrical equipment if you are not
qualified.
125
(No Transcript)
126
Mark Twain once wrote, "It is better to be
careful one-hundred times than to get killed
once."
127
The most unsafe act I ever saw!
128
QUESTIONS? - SUGGESTIONS?E-mail Andy Macias
129
Get out a sheet of paper.
  • Number your sheet from 1 to 10.
  • Read the following test questions.
  • Answer the questions on your paper.
  • The answers follow the test.
  • Good luck!

130
Test What You Know
  • True or FalseFour reasons for maintaining a
    safe workplaceSafety sustains productivity,
    promotes morale, is required by law, and requires
    everyones participation.
  • 2. What government agency monitors safety in the
    workplace?
  • 3. List one safety hazard that may be present in
    our offices?
  • 4. Name one thing you should never do with
    extension cords.
  • 5. What is the proper way to reach for an object?

131
Test What You Know (cont.)
  • 6. List one thing you can do to practice good
    ergonomics in the office.
  • 7. List one thing you should know to be safe
    during an office emergency situation.
  • 8. Who is responsible for your safety?
  • 9. How often should you inspect your PPE?
  • 10. True or False Stress can lead to back
    injuries.

132
Test What You Know (cont.)
  • Next slide will be the answers to the test
    questions Good luck!

133
Test What You KnowAnswers
  • 1. TRUE!Four reasons for maintaining a safe
    workplace Safety sustains productivity,
    promotes morale, is required by law, and requires
    everyones participation.
  • 2. What government agency monitors safety in the
    workplace? The Occupational Safety and Health
    Administration (OSHA).
  • 3. List one safety hazard that may be present in
    our offices? Open file cabinet drawers, unstable
    furniture, hot equipment, etc...

134
Test What You KnowAnswers
  • 4. Name one thing you should never do with
    extension cords. Never run them across stairs or
    aisles and dont fasten them down with nails or
    staples!
  • 5. What is the proper way to reach for an object?
    Move your body close to the object dont twist.
    Stand for objects on high shelves (get a
    stepstool, if necessary), and dont overextend.

135
Test What You KnowAnswers
  • 6. List one thing you can do to practice good
    ergonomics.
  • Arrange your workstation for proper fit, sit
    properly, avoid repetitive motions, take breaks,
    keep wrists straight
  • 7. List one thing you should know to be safe
    during emergency situation?
  • The location of fire alarms and extinguishers,
    what alarms sound like, two evacuation routes,
    and where to meet outside the building.

136
Test What You KnowAnswers
  • 8. Who is responsible for your safety?
  • YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR SAFETY!
  • 9. How often should you inspect your PPE?
    Before every use your PPE (personal protective
    equipment) should be inspected.
  • 10. True or False Stress can lead to back
    injuries.
  • TRUE! Excessive stress affects our bodies and
    can cause chronic misalignments in the spine and
    joints of the body.

137
Training Complete!
  • Congratulations upon completing your
    training!Next Send an e-mail note to Andy
    Macias and Mary Blotna so that we may update
    your personal SAFETY record.In your e-mail, tell
    us the course name you completed
  • General Safety Training and Emergency Action Plan
    training
  • and also tell us the training date you completed
    this training course.
    Send us something
    along these lines
  • I have completed my training requirement by
    reviewing General Safety Training and Emergency
    Action Plan training on this date mm/dd/yyyy.

138
Thank you and work safe!
Heneghan and AssociatesGENERAL SAFETY TRAINING
and EMERGENCY ACTION PLANS
May 20, 2008 ARM
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