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Expanding Extracurricular Learning Opportunities Through International Engineering Student and Faculty Exchange

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July 2005 Site Visits in Poland. Extracurricular Learning Opportunities ... 1970-72: Allen Bradley. 1978-84: Cutler-Hammer. 1984-86: Square D. 1986-91: A.O. Smith ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Expanding Extracurricular Learning Opportunities Through International Engineering Student and Faculty Exchange


1
Expanding Extracurricular Learning Opportunities
Through International Engineering Student and
Faculty Exchange
  • Dr. Mark Polczynski Engineering
    Director Engineering Management Program Marquette
    University College of Engineering mark.polczynski_at_
    marquette.edu

2
  • Topics
  • Changes in the Engineering Profession Where are
    the Engineers?
  • Impact on Engineering Engineering
    Education What to Do vs. How to Do It
  • The Program International Engineering Research
    and Exchange
  • Initial Activities and Results July 2005 Site
    Visits in Poland
  • Extracurricular Learning Opportunities

3
  • A Brief Personal Bio
  • 1970-72 Allen Bradley
  • 1978-84 Cutler-Hammer
  • 1984-86 Square D
  • 1986-91 A.O. Smith
  • 1991-04 Eaton
  • 2005 Marquette University

Where have all the engineers gone!
4
  • There is absolutely no question that
  • The worlds dependence on technology and
    technologists is increasing rapidly, and
  • Technology and technologists are key elements of
    a thriving economy,
  • So the world needs more technologists,
  • But

5
  • Many companies are striving to grow sales and
    profits
  • While simultaneously reducing tangible assets,
    including
  • Buildings,
  • Machines and equipment,
  • People, including high-cost, high-maintenance
    engineering staffs,
  • A trend which is being accelerated by

6
  • 1. Migration of engineering to low cost
    countries (LCCs)
  • Increasing technical capabilities and resources,
  • Increasing accessibility
  • Shift to electronic documentation, model-based
    design-simulation-testing, spread of the
    Internet, etc., dramatically improves the
    viability of utilizing LCC engineering to reduce
    tangible assets
  • 2. Automation of engineering tasks
  • Combinatorial research to develop
    pharmaceuticals,
  • Genetic programming to automate software
    development,
  • Etc

7
  • Impact on Engineering
  • We know that manufacturing and services have been
    highly outsourced/offshored,
  • And that major shifts in software development and
    IT are underway,
  • And that similar changes are occurring in other
    previously high tech functions such as X-ray
    diagnosis and patent preparation are occurring,
  • So why would we expect engineering in general to
    follow a different evolution?

8
Model for a Global Economy
- Where are the engineers? - Who do they work
for? - What are they doing?
Virtual Global (i.e., LCC) Design/Mfg/Service Pip
elines
Company
Customers
9
  • Fundamental Premise
  • Any engineering function that can be reduced to a
    well-defined (though not necessarily simple) set
    of actions
  • Ultimately will be
  • So can be readily automated or offshored to LLCs
  • And ultimately will be.
  • We term such functions how-to-do-it engineering.

10
Model for a Global Economy
Traditional role How-To-Do-It Engineering
Virtual Global (i.e., LCC) Design/Mfg/Service Pip
elines
Specifications
Company
Orders
Products Services
Customers
11
  • Topics
  • Changes in the Engineering Profession Where are
    the Engineers?
  • Impact on Engineering Engineering
    Education What to Do vs. How to Do It
  • The Program International Engineering Research
    and Exchange
  • Initial Activities and Results July 2005 Site
    Visits in Poland
  • Extracurricular Learning Opportunities

12
Who will fill the front end of the pipeline?
Traditional role How-To-Do-It Engineering
Virtual Global (LCC) Design/Mfg/Service Pipeline
s
Specifications
Company
Orders
Products Services
Customers
13
  • Entrepreneurial Engineering ? What-To-Do
    Engineering ? Filling the front end of the
    pipeline ?
  • Identify, acquire, develop, protect, and transfer
    technology,
  • Generate new technology-based opportunities
    through technology commercialization.

14
Entrepreneurial Engineering Education Question
Where do successful entrepreneurial engineers
come from? A. From the trenches. B. From the
School of Hard Knocks. C. From
entrepreneurial engineering education
programs. D. All of the above. Problem The
U.S. (and the world) needs more and better
entrepreneurial engineers now. Part of the
Solution The purpose of entrepreneurial
engineering education programs is to improve the
quality and rate of development of
entrepreneurial engineers.
15
  • Entrepreneurial Engineering Initiative
  • Teaches students how to fill the front end of the
    pipeline with viable innovative technology-based
    opportunities.
  • Generates new opportunities through project work
    focusing on technology commercialization.
  • Systematically leverages university research as a
    primary source of new opportunities.

WIP
16
  • How is This Different Than What We Have?
  • Entrepreneurs help build new pipelines,
  • Engineering managers help run the pipelines,
  • Entrepreneurial engineers help fill the
    pipelines.

WIP
17
  • Topics
  • Changes in the Engineering Profession Where are
    the Engineers?
  • Impact on Engineering Engineering
    Education What to Do vs. How to Do It
  • The Program International Engineering Research
    and Exchange
  • Initial Activities and Results July 2005 Site
    Visits in Poland
  • Extracurricular Learning Opportunities

18
  • Need for an International Element
  • Field of entrepreneurial engineering is heavily
    driven by globalization.
  • It is essential to have a strong international
    element to the entrepreneurial engineering
    initiative.
  • International Engineering Research and Exchange
    Program
  • Creates an international learning and research
    environment that prepares students to effectively
    function on global entrepreneurial teams,
  • Leverages RD resources at partner schools to
    significantly augment results and
    commercialization of the Colleges RD programs,
  • Generates global technology-oriented business
    opportunities through cooperative student and
    faculty entrepreneurial project teams.

19
  • Note
  • An international engineering educational program
    is no longer nice to have.
  • Its not a cultural exchange holiday.
  • Based on changes in the engineering profession,
    it is now a need to have program.
  • It could be a stand-alone program.
  • But we are tying this tightly to our
    entrepreneurial engineering initiative.
  • Because we see the two issues as being
    intertwined.
  • Thats why we went through the previous 18 slides!

20
  • Benefits of International Cooperation
  • Conducting research at U.S. educational
    institutions is expensive.
  • Expanding research capabilities and
    course/program offerings is difficult, -
    Barriers to entry.
  • Replacing outmoded programs is almost
    impossible, - Barriers to exit.
  • These are the same forces that drive industry to
    cooperation with external sources (outsourcing
    and offshoring).
  • Universities that apply industry-equivalent
    sourcing models can significantly improve the
    effectiveness of their teaching and research
    programs.

Globalization can help develop cost-effective
means to aggressively pursue research and
educational programs that drive new
technology-based business opportunities.
21
An (Over) Simplified View of the Program
Cooperative Research Programs
New Business Opportunities
Technical Capabilities
Partner School
Global
Marquette University
New Business Opportunities
Entrepreneurial Engineering
U.S.
  • Of course, all participants contribute to and
    enhance technical and entrepreneurial
    capabilities and activities.
  • But the general value proposition is to combine
    College-driven entrepreneurial engineering with
    strong partner technology.
  • The following is an (over)simplified view of how
    exchange is conducted

22
Marquette University
Students
Faculty
Partner School
Partner School
Students
Faculty
Marquette
23
  • Current Status
  • We are in the process of identifying partner
    universities interested and capable of becoming
    involved in this international engineering
    cooperative research and student/faculty exchange
    program.
  • Current focus is on Central Europe, and Poland in
    particular

24
  • Why Poland?
  • Target of outsourcing by U.S. businesses,
    increasing the opportunity for industrial
    participation in research commercialization,
  • Well-developed technical educational system
    (lt130,000 engineering students!), increases
    probability of forming productive relationships,
  • Technical universities generally have English
    language programs significant numbers of
    faculty/students have adequate capabilities in
    English,
  • Has a cultural affinity for Western-style
    entrepreneurship, increasing the probability of
    success for this first venture.
  • Has a high unemployment rate (19), needs to
    create new jobs in Polish businesses, and has a
    high interest in entrepreneurial engineering.

25
  • Why Else?
  • Poland is not the only country with these
    characteristics. But Poland also has certain
    specific characteristics that made it a good
    choice for a first venture
  • Milwaukee (home of Marquette University) has a
    large and active community of descendants of
    Polish immigrants, thereby providing a natural
    support structure for exchange students and
    faculty,
  • The College of Engineering had a strong exchange
    program with Polish universities in the 1970s
    (especially at Wroclaw), and some personal
    linkages remain,
  • A number of influential College alumni have ties
    to Poland, thus increasing the opportunity for
    industry cooperation.
  • Also, as a new member of NATO and the EU, and as
    a strong supporter of the U.S., it is important
    for Poland to develop a strong economy and a
    strong presence in Central Europe.

26
Also, its cool
27
  • Topics
  • Changes in the Engineering Profession Where are
    the Engineers?
  • Impact on Engineering Engineering
    Education What to Do vs. How to Do It
  • The Program International Engineering Research
    and Exchange
  • Initial Activities and Results July 2005 Site
    Visits in Poland
  • Extracurricular Learning Opportunities

28
  • Site Visits To Date July 2005
  • Largest five technical universities in Poland
    were visited to determine interest/ability to
    participate in cooperative research and
    student/faculty exchange
  • Gdansk ga-dine-sk
  • Krakow kra-coof
  • Poznan poze-nine
  • Wroclaw vrots-waf
  • Warsaw war-sha-va
  • Combined enrollment gt 120,000 engineers (40M
    total population)

29
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30
  • Some Terminology
  • Polytechnic University ? Technical University
  • Rector ? President
  • Prorector ? Vice Rector ? Vice President
  • University contains multiple Faculties
  • Each Faculty has a Dean
  • Each Faculty contains Institutes
  • Each Faculty has typically several thousand
    students

31
  • Site Visit Special Issues
  • July is holiday season in Poland - not all
    faculty and administrators were available for
    discussions at these visits.
  • All senior leadership positions at these
    institutions (presidents down to deans) are
    elected (three-year term, two-term limit). This
    was election year, with September 1 being the
    start of the new term.
  • Some language barriers encountered, primarily at
    Krakow.
  • All cold calls by the Colleges representative,
    with only e-mails and phone calls exchanged with
    key contacts before the visits.
  • Copies of various documents associated with the
    entrepreneurial engineering initiative were sent
    ahead.
  • Discussions were well and enthusiastically
    attended at all the institutions, with contacts
    ranging from faculty researchers up to Rectors.

32
  • Warsaw University of Technology
    (http//www.pw.edu.pl/)
  • 35,000 students, and over 370 professors, 1000
    tutors, 500 lecturers and 340 teaching assistants
    located on three campuses. Current faculties
  • Architecture
  • Automobile and Heavy Machinery Engineering
  • Chemical and Process Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Civil Engineering, Mechanics, and
    Pertochemistry
  • Economics and Social Science
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Electronics and Information Technology
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Geodesy and Cartography
  • Mathematics and Information Science
  • Material Science and Engineering
  • Mechatronics
  • Physics
  • Power and Aeronautical Engineering
  • Production Engineering
  • Transport

33
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34
  • Wroclaw University of Technology
    (http//www.pwr.wroc.pl/) 32,000 full-time and
    part-time students studying in Wroclaw and at
    three branches located in the largest towns of
    the region. Staff of almost 4,200, including
    2,035 academic teachers. Current faculties
  • Architecture
  • Civil Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Electronics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Mining Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Computer Science and Management
  • Mechanical and Power Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Fundamental Problems of Technology
  • Microsystem Electronics and Photonics

35
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36
  • Krakow University of Technology
    (http//www.pk.edu.pl/)
  • 17,000 students. Staff of 2200, with 1200
    academic instructors. 215 professors and
    associate professors, including 77 full
    professors. The university has seven faculties,
    all of which grant doctoral degrees (currently
    about 230 PhD students)
  • Architecture
  • Civil Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Applied Physics and Computer Modeling
  • Chemical Engineering and Technology

37
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38
  • Gdansk University of Technology
    (http//www.pg.gda.pl/)
  • 2,500 staff, including 1200 academics. The number
    of students approximates 20,000. Current
    faculties
  • Applied Physics and Mathematics
  • Architecture
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Electronics, Telecommunication and Informatics
  • Electrical and Control Engineering

39
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40
  • Poznan University of Technology
    (http//www.put.poznan.pl/)
  • 19,000 students, and over 1000 academic teachers.
  • Current faculties
  • Architecture
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering and Management
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Technical Physics
  • Information Technology and Management
  • Working Machines and Transportation
  • Chemical Technology

41
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42
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43
  • Some Polish History
  • During WW-II, many cities were leveled (except
    Krakow).
  • Many of the intelligentsia were killed off in
    one fashion or another.
  • This included university faculty (even tenured
    full professors!).
  • But engineers tended to be sent to slave labor
    camps, and many survived the war.
  • So, after the war, there were no university
    buildings or faculty.
  • They re-built the buildings,
  • And replaced engineering faculty with working
    engineers (gasp!).
  • The Poles say that this tends to make the
    technical universities practically-oriented.

44
  • So What?!
  • Identified potential cooperative research areas,
    and initiated entry level activities with the
    following characteristics
  • Low or no incremental cost, work already being
    done or planned by both partners,
  • Highly synergistic, dont require significant
    changes in direction by either partner,
  • High probability of success, clear and simple
    linkages between efforts,
  • Make a visible difference, things that might be
    difficult to do well independently.
  • Also identified
  • One program-level opportunity,
  • Initial faculty exchange opportunity.

45
  • Purpose Behind Initial Cooperative Research
    Efforts
  • These initial opportunities might not ultimately
    prove to be the optimal area of cooperation
    between the institutions.
  • They may not be the best opportunities for
    research commercialization.
  • The focus here is to
  • Open the door to more ambitious and
    highly-aligned future efforts,
  • Generate evidence that productive cooperation is
    possible.
  • Currently there is no funding for more ambitious
    and long-term efforts.
  • But we dont anticipate any significant funding
    without some demonstrated ability to actually
    produce useful results.

46
  • Example Of Cooperative Initial Research Activity
  • Dr. Irena Chmielewska at Poznan University of
    Technology is doing research on speaker
    recognition.
  • Speaker recognition algorithms depend on native
    language of the speaker.
  • This researcher has a large database of Polish
    native speakers, but desires to expand the
    database to other languages.
  • Milwaukee has a large population of native
    Mexican Spanish speakers,
  • Marquettes College of Engineering has a speech
    recognition recording lab.
  • Marquette will record local native Mexican
    Spanish speakers per Dr. Cmielewskas protocol,
    which can then be incorporated into her database.
  • Initial contact has been made with Milwaukees
    United Community Center to bring native speakers
    to the Colleges lab.
  • Awaiting Dr. Chmeliewskas text sets.
  • Strong commercialization opportunities.

47
  • Environmental Planning and Management
  • Gdansk University of Technology has an
    undergraduate program in Environmental Planning
    and Management.
  • This is a major issue in Poland that has taken on
    an even greater significance since entry into the
    EU.
  • This program is conducted totally in English.
  • The reason is that the focal point of the program
    is the Baltic Sea (which Gdansk is on),
  • The Baltic is surrounded by six countries
    speaking six different languages.
  • So, the researchers have selected English as the
    common language.
  • Graduates from the Gdansk program that go on for
    a Masters tend to study in one of the other
    countries on the Baltic.
  • Studying at Marquette University would be an
    attractive alternative, since the students speak
    English, and Milwaukee is on Lake Michigan, which
    has environmental issues similar to the Baltic
    Sea.

48
Mini-Course in Entrepreneurial Engineering Plann
ing for Poznan, Warsaw, and Krakow in Summer
2006. Presenter is revising Strategic Technology
Planning and Development course being prepared
into a one-week format suitable for Polish
students and faculty. Providing this one week
course will - Stimulate future RD
cooperation between institutions, - Stimulate
future exchange of students and teachers, -
Introduce an important subject area not covered
at the Polish universities, - Give Polish
students and teachers an opportunity to
experience a class taught by a native
English speaker. Although significant numbers
of students at these institutions are enrolled in
English language courses, they often lack
self-confidence in conversing with native English
speakers. This is a major hurdle to
student/faculty exchange.
49
  • Some Observations
  • Institutions are large and tend to be
    conservative and bureaucratic.
  • Teaching loads are quite high.
  • Person-to-person communication links difficult to
    establish and maintain.
  • Senior leadership positions are elected, causing
    convoluted and shifting roles, responsibilities,
    and spheres of control and influence.
  • It is difficult to determine exactly who needs to
    be contacted to generate specific program actions
    and results.
  • Difficult to establish and maintain robust
    communications links with these individuals once
    they are identified.
  • Since the field is new, there is no defined
    entity within the partner universities to
    cooperate with, i.e., no Faculty of
    Entrepreneurial Engineering.

50
  • Bottom Line
  • Initial site visits were quite successful from
    the perspective of creating a base communication
    network and establishing initial cooperative
    efforts.
  • But all of the previously-cited complicating
    factors are still at work.
  • Robust communication linkages do not yet exist.
  • Failure to rapidly and firmly cement program
    linkages jeopardizes this effort.

51
  • Topics
  • Changes in the Engineering Profession Where are
    the Engineers?
  • Impact on Engineering Engineering
    Education What to Do vs. How to Do It
  • The Program International Engineering
    Cooperative Research and Student/Faculty
    Exchange
  • Initial Activities and Results July 2005 Site
    Visits in Poland
  • Extracurricular Learning Opportunities

52
Entrepreneurial Engineering is all about
extracurricular activities
  • Entrepreneurial Engineering Initiative
  • Teaches students how to fill the front end of the
    pipeline with viable innovative technology-based
    opportunities.
  • Generates new opportunities through project work
    focusing on technology commercialization.
  • Systematically leverages university research as a
    primary source of new opportunities.

53
  • IEREP is the ultimate extracurricular activity
  • International Engineering Research and Exchange
    Program
  • Creates an international learning and research
    environment that prepares students to
    effectively function on global
    entrepreneurial teams,
  • Leverages RD resources at partner schools to
    significantly augment results and
    commercialization of the Colleges RD
    programs,
  • Generates global technology-oriented business
    opportunities through cooperative student
    and faculty entrepreneurial project teams.

54
  • So What?!
  • Clearly, the Entrepreneurial Engineering
    Initiative and the International Engineering
    Research and Exchange Program provide many and
    varied opportunities for extracurricular
    activities.
  • But given limited time, money, and other
    resources, what are we actually going to do?
  • We are focusing on two primary extracurricular
    opportunities
  • International Engineering Research and Exchange

1
2
55
  • Extracurricular Opportunity 1 - Research
  • Courses being developed and modified to support
    entrepreneurial engineering are all
    entrepreneurial project oriented, e.g.
  • Strategic Technology Planning And Development
  • Technology of Innovation Course Series -
    Software - Hardware - Process
  • Intellectual Property Generation and Protection
  • Initial goals - Link all student team
    projects with cooperative research efforts
    at international partner universities.
    - All student project teams to generate project
    funding through mechanisms such as
    NCIIA Advanced E-Teams. - Student team
    members travel to partner schools between
    semesters to participate in cooperative
    research efforts.

56
  • Focused Extracurricular Opportunity 2 - Exchange
  • Goal is to eventually convert all
    entrepreneurially-oriented engineering
    courses to one-week all-day mini-courses.
  • These courses would be taught between semesters
    at international partner schools.
  • These courses would be taught by Marquette
    engineering faculty.
  • Engineering students would act as TAs for these
    courses.

57
  • What Next?
  • Initial goal is to get two batches of
    engineering students traveling to partner schools
    per year - Grads and undergrads, - 2-4
    weeks, - Summer break - winter break, -
    Starting in Poland Gdansk, Krakow, Poznan,
    Warsaw, Wroclaw
  • First limited prototype Summer 2006! No money
    (yet), No students (yet), No course (yet), But
    initial projects being planned, And Poznan,
    Warsaw, and Krakow signing up students!

58
Expanding Extracurricular Learning Opportunities
Through International Engineering Student and
Faculty Exchange
Thank You!
  • Dr. Mark Polczynski Engineering
    Director Engineering Management Program Marquette
    University College of Engineering mark.polczynski_at_
    marquette.edu
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