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Troubadour: Creative Assemblages Thematically Grouped Case Studies Of Creative Practice

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Title: Troubadour: Creative Assemblages Thematically Grouped Case Studies Of Creative Practice


1
Troubadour Creative Assemblages Thematically
Grouped Case Studies Of Creative Practice
  • Drew Hemment, FutureEverything/Lancaster
    University
  • Gabriella Giannachi, Exeter University
  • Bill Gaver, Goldsmiths, University of London
  • RAs
  • Alex Wilkie, Goldsmiths
  • Vanessa Bartlett, FutureEverything

2
ImaginationLancaster, Lancaster University
  • A new interdisciplinary research lab at Lancaster
    University
  • Environment 2.0 is the culmination of 3 years of
    activities in Manchester, Lancaster, Singapore
    and Berlin
  • "A populace so knowing and capable that all
    problems get noticed and addressed, quickly, by
    a billion eyes."
  • David Brin
  • Led by ImaginationLancaster and FutureEverything

3
FutureEverything / Futuresonic
  • Est. 1995, Futuresonic is the UK's leading
    festival for digital culture, based in
    Manchester. Last year the festival attracted an
    audience of in excess of 50,000 people and its
    acclaimed conference, the Social Technologies
    Summit, attracted 900 people over three days.
  • Futuresonic was a part of Lancaster University's
    successful RAE return in Art Design (4th in
    UK), shortlisted for the prestigious 2009 Lever
    Prize, and awarded RFO status by Arts Council
    England and Pillar Status by Manchester City
    Council.

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The idea
  • We conducted a survey of interdisciplinary
    projects involving creative practitioners to
    better understand how they were organised and the
    types of outcomes and impacts they made, in the
    hope of questioning assumptions about the
    benefits that might properly be expected from
    this style of research.
  • The study involved a thematically organised set
    of case studies which were generated from a
    survey of 100 projects, a Research Note
    summarising key findings, and a web resource
    (forthcoming) documenting circa 50 case studies.

8
The focus
  • Using a subject theme - the environment - to
    limit example numbers without constraining space
    of activity.
  • 01.Home and Products
  • 02.Sustainability and Energy
  • 03.Cities and Transport
  • 04.Weather

9
Value for Creator
  • Project aims
  • reveal multiple models of practise amongst
    creative, technical, commercial and public-sector
    partners,
  • expose multiple forms of knowledge transfer
    depending on the nature and output of
    collaboration,
  • inform long-term research agendas through the
    elucidation of multiple and potentially
    contrasting factors for successful collaboration,
    and
  • through the breadth of possibilities exposed by
    this study, inspire new collaborations between
    the creative industry and academic partners.

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Bottom-up investigation
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Bottom-up case studies
  • Open tags
  • One off, multiyear, ongoing
  • Industry, Art, Design, Academic
  • Local, National, International
  • Collaborative, Non-collaborative
  • Community, Participatory, Public
  • Utility, Provocation, Advocacy
  • Can be modified by users (Modifiable),
    Interactive, finished
  • Accessible, Specialist

12
Bottom-up case studies
  • Orienting questions
  • Creative contribution What was the significant
    innovation in approach or thinking behind the
    project? How can this be recognisably attributed
    to the involvement of creative practice?
  • Collaboration What were the disciplinary
    contributors to the project? What model of
    research / development was followed? What were
    factors leading to success / problems?
  • Values What were the outcomes of the project?
    How were these disseminated to outside
    stakeholders? What models of value are implied
    by these outputs?

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Diversity
  • Sites of engagement
  • contemporary art
  • consumer products
  • industrial trade shows
  • policy intervention
  • community events

46
Diversity
  • Outcomes
  • journal articles
  • prototypes
  • domestic appliances
  • participatory workshops
  • artworks
  • press coverage
  • postgraduate researchers
  • PhD theses
  • a research community

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Diversity
  • Various groupings of
  • university departments
  • large corporate organisations
  • small corporate organisations
  • funding agencies
  • government departments and agencies
  • galleries
  • museums
  • homes
  • independent artists/designers

48
Creative Assemblages
  • 1) Compact and closed assemblages
  • 2) Compact and open assemblages
  • 3) Loose and open assemblages

49
Wattson
  • A consumer product that allows people to monitor
    their domestic electricity consumption.
  • Designed and is marketed by the London based
    product design studio DIY KYOTO.
  • It involved relatively few authors and
    stakeholders
  • Output was restricted to a commercial product
    (as opposed to, for instance, descriptions of
    process)
  • Prospective users were conceived as
    environmentally concerned consumers rather than,
    for example, collaborators or discussants

50
ERARAT (Environmental Risk Assessment Rover)
  • An artwork created in 2008 by two artists,
    working under the name EcoArtTech.
  • It is an apparatus that uses its own GPS
    coordinates to gather local risk and
    environmental data (for example air quality,
    local road traffic accident reports and current
    US terrorist warning levels) for video projection
    onto nearby surfaces.
  • Involves a limited number of contributors
  • Encourages discussion among an open-ended public

51
STATIC!
  • Investigates and promotes awareness of energy use
    through the discipline of interaction design.
  • By the Swedish Interaction Institute between 2004
    and 2005
  • Disciplinary contributors were diverse, and there
    were multiple stakeholders including academic,
    government and commercial agencies.
  • Outputs domestic product prototypes,
    postgraduate theses, symposiums, workshops and
    seminars, and publications.

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Creative Assemblages
  • 1) Compact and closed assemblages
  • 2) Compact and open assemblages
  • 3) Loose and open assemblages

53
Creative Assemblages
  • Creativity is integral to how the project
    functions as an assemblage.
  • We observed a correlation between looseness and
    openness.
  • Relatively compact assemblages in the survey
    tended to produce outputs that are relatively
    closed and constrained, amenable to intellectual
    property protection.
  • Rather than producing a linear transfer of
    intellectual property for commercial gain,
    projects that are loose and open arguably create
    the conditions in which intellectual property can
    be developed by a wide variety of people in a
    broad range of settings.

54
Environment 2.0 - One Billion Eyes
  • "A populace so knowing and capable that all
    problems get noticed and addressed, quickly, by a
    billion eyes."
  • - David Brin
  • Environment 2.0 is the culmination of 3 years of
    activities in Manchester, Lancaster, Singapore
    and Berlin

55
Environment 2.0 - One Billion Eyes
  • Outputs
  • Conference event at Futuresonic 2007
  • Workshop at Lancaster University
  • Workshop at ISEA2008
  • Conference event at Transmediale08
  • A themed call of international journal Leonardo
  • Exhibition featuring 30 international artists at
    Futuresonic 2009
  • Two large scale participatory mass observation
    projects
  • An unconference at Social Technologies Summit 09
  • Academic papers
  • A large EPSRC funding bid

56
Environment 2.0 - One Billion Eyes
  • Participants
  • Futuresonic/FutureEverything
  • Natural History Museum
  • OPAL (Open Air Laboratories Network)
  • Lancaster Environment Centre
  • ImaginationLancaster
  • CESAGen
  • Lancaster University
  • Christian Nold
  • Alfie Dennon
  • Yara El-Sherbini
  • FoAM
  • Creative Concern
  • Tyndall Centre Manchester
  • Friends of the Earth
  • Ministry of Transport

57
Environment 2.0 - One Billion Eyes
  • Environment 2.0
  • A FutureEverything project conceived as Creative
    Assemblage
  • My role is as curator, or strange connector,
    making unexpected connections, and working
    collaboratively with a broad constellation of
    participants to create something coherent and
    meaningful, with numerous heterogeneous outcomes.
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