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Aging

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Title: Aging


1
Aging AccessibilityGroup 4 International
IssueHS 5413 Current Issues in HealthDepartment
of Health Studies Texas Womans
UniversitySummer I 2003 - Dr. Robin RagerEllen
Perlow-July 1, 2003This document is available in
alternative formats upon request.
2
In memoryDr. Seuss - Theodor Seuss Geisel
(March 2,1904-September 24, 1991) who said it so
wellYou only live once. (1986)(at your local
library - PS 3513 .E2 Y6 1986)
3
Aging a Premier, Universal International
Health Issue
  • Aging or Senescence the progressive
    deterioration of virtually every bodily function
    over time (Austad, 1997, 6).
  • Aging universal, ubiquitous, omnipresent
    everybody
  • Immortality a possibility, ethical? Telomerase
    (Enzyme may offer cell immortality, 1998
    Ettinger, 1965 Fischer, 2000 Telomerase, 1997)

4
Aging a Premier, Universal International
Health Issue
  • In our diverse and ever-changing world the ageing
    sic process is one of the few things that
    unifies and defines us all. We all are ageing and
    should celebrate this natural process. Because
    human beings must grow older, ageing is an issue
    that concerns us all (WHO, 2003b). Aging is
    something that happens to all of us. It is a
    natural and virtually inevitable process
    (Atchley, 2000, 3).
  • Human species 2003 aging/mortality rate100

5
World Life Expectancy
  • (U.S. Bureau of the Census, International Data
    Base, 2002a)
  • Table 010. Life Expectancy at Birth, by Sex
  • ---------------- ---------- ---------- ----------
  • Life Life Life
  • Country or area/ expectancy expectancy expectancy
  • Year both sexes male female
  • ---------------- ---------- ---------- ----------
  • WORLDLIFEEXPECTANCY
  • 1950 55.8 53.8 57.8
    (222)
  • 1975 51.9 51.5 52.2
    (192)
  • 2000 63.6 62.0 65.2
  • 2025 69.1 67.0 71.3
    (4)
  • 2050 76.6 74.1 79.3
    (4)
  • (data missing for certain countries)

6
Aging Accessibility Premier International
Health Issue
  • "Living longer means new health concerns. In
    fact, it is estimated that the number of older
    persons needing long-term care may double over
    the next 25 years 7 million in 1994 14 million
    by 2020 24 million by 2060" (Wellness Councils
    of America, 2002).

7
Accessibility Some Definitions
  • Accessibility the ability to access, the state
    of being practicable, feasible, performable,
    achievable, surmountable, attainable, and
    obtainable (Perlow, 2003)
  • Adaptive Capacity The genetically set range or
    flexibility of reactions of an organism enabling
    it to respond in different ways to differing
    conditions. (GardenWeb Glossary of Botanical
    Terms. 2002)

8
Accessibility Some Definitions
  • Assistive Technology Any aid, device or tool,
    compensatory strategy, used in many different
    environments, information and referral,
    evaluation and recommendation, resources for
    funding, designing, fabricating, repairing, and
    fitting, training, support and follow-through
    service that improves a person's functional
    capability (University of Kentucky.
    Interdisciplinary Human Development Institute,
    2003).

9
Accessibility Some Definitions
  • Differability/Differabilities The universal
    diversity of doing things differently. (Perlow,
    2003)
  • People with Differabilities People who represent
    the diversity of doing things differently
    Everyone! (Perlow, 2003)

10
Accessibility Some Definitions
  • Universal Design "The design of products and
    environments to be usable by all people, to the
    greatest extent possible, without the need for
    adaptation or specialized designThe intent of
    universal design is to simplify life for everyone
    by making products, communications, and the built
    environment more usable by as many people as
    possible at little or no extra cost. Universal
    design benefits people of all ages and abilities
    (NCSU, 2003).

11
Accessibility Some Definitions
  • Universal Design "Universal design is the
    design of products and environment to be usable
    by all people, to the greatest extent possible,
    without the need for adaptation or specialized
    design (Stewart, 2002).

12
Prevalence/Incidence Population of China
2000-2050
International Database (U.S. Bureau of the
Census. (2002a, October 10).
13
Prevalence/Incidence U.S. Population 2000-2050
International Database (U.S. Bureau of the
Census. (2002b, October 10).
14
Importance of Issue / Sources
  • Aging Flattening of pyramid People who are
    elderly growing percentage of world population
  • China population of people 80 years old or more
  • 2000 0.9 2025 2.3 2050 8.1 of population
    (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2002a).
  • U.S. population of people 80 years old or more
  • 2000 3.3 2025 4.5 2050 8.0 of population
    (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2002b).

15
Importance of Issue / Sources
  • World Health Organization (2003a) 2000-2025
  • Worldwide population of people aged 60 years or
    over 600 million-gt1.2 billion
  • Worldwide population people aged 80 or over
    fastest growing population group
  • 2000-2025 changing demands on health care
    system, particularly in developing nations (WHO,
    2003d)

16
Importance of Accessibility
  • Accessibility global marketplace issue
  • 10 or people/most nations-differabilities
  • Average age/population-many nations rising
  • Results of agingcombinations / accessibility
    issues vision, hearing, dexterity, memory. Few
    organizations can afford to deliberately miss
    this market sector" (W3C WAI, 2003c).

17
Importance of Accessibility
  • People who are considered elderly (65 years old)
    are at increased risk for having differabilities
    (Vanderheiden, 1990).
  • Continued success of international annual
    California State University at Northridge (CSUN)
    "International Conference on Technology and
    Persons with Disabilities - The Real Oscars
    (CSUN, 2003)

18
(No Transcript)
19
Life -gt Aging -gt Adaptive Capacity Life -gt
Adaptive Capacity -gt Accessibility
20
Prevalence/Incidence Aging Accessibility
  • 100

21
Aging Accessibility Health Promotion Strategy
  • Original Strategy Celebrations, awareness
    campaigns co-sponsored by WHO, U.N., UNESCO, etc.
    on Aging Accessibility... Decade of .
    International Day of Older Persons (U.N., 2002)

22
Aging Accessibility Health Promotion Strategy
  • SOPHE experiences (Perlow, 2002, 2003)
    interviews with IUHPE international health
    education expert (W. Cissell, personal
    communication, 2003), revised strategy
  • Internationally incorporation, integration of
    accessibility awareness, training, and practice
    into required Health Ed. curricula (elementary,
    higher, continuing education)

23
Aging Accessibility Health Promotion Strategy
Specifics
  • Well-received poster sessions on accessibility
    (Perlow, 2002, 2003) SOPHE (2003) - U.S.
    national health education conferences many
    international participants
  • Presentations on aging, accessibility 2004 IUHPE
    International conference, Melbourne, Australia
    (IUHPE, 2003a), IUHPE workshops
  • Article submissions-journal of IUHPE (1998)

24
Aging Accessibility Health Promotion Strategy
Specifics
  • Active participation committee meetings at IUHPE
    conference presentation of recommended required
    curricula
  • Cross-pollination facilitation of international
    collaboration among IUHPE, partners (WHO,
    UNESCO, UNICEF), aging-related agencies (U.S.
    NIA/AARP, 2003), accessibility (ICDRI, 2003
    WorldEnable, 2003 W3C WAI, 2003a)

25
Effectiveness of Strategy
  • "Assuring the ability to access or accessibility
    of health education and health care is a standard
    prerequisite for health professionals provision
    of such services. Accessibility training,
    awareness, and practice thus need to be key
    components within the core curriculum of every
    health education program. Our diverse,
    ever-changing, and aging world also demands that
    we achieve and implement this objective" (Perlow,
    2003c).

26
Effectiveness of Strategy
  • Once accessibility required "given" in global
    health education curricula, our future health
    educator mentors in elementary and secondary
    schools, and in higher education -- all health
    care professionals (who are aging Members of the
    Class too!) - will ensure that there is a global
    awareness, appreciation, and practice of
    accessibility.
  • Health educators enthusiasm accessibility
    issues

27
Advocacy Organization IUHPE
  • International Union for Health Promotion and
    Education IUHPE http//www.iuhpe.org/
  • IUHPE Mission to promote global health and
    contribute to the achievement of equity of health
    between and within countries of the world
    (IUHPE, 2000).
  • Mission matches mission of accessibility.

28
Advocacy Organization IUHPE
  • International, independent association of health
    educators, not government-appointed researchers
    and policymakers, politics-free
  • Founded 1951, headquartered in Paris
  • IUHPE publishes peer-reviewed Promotion
    Education, the International Journal of Health
    Promotion and Education

29
Advocacy Organization IUHPE
  • Regional offices worldwide (IUHPE, 2003c)
  • IUHPE works closely and collaborates with many
    other global health groups, including WHO,
    UNICEF, UNESCO. WHO headquartered in Geneva,
    UNESCO-Paris (IUHPE, 2003c)
  • IUHPE International Expert Panel Directory, 2000
    (IUHPE, 2000) - Expert TWU Dept. of Health
    Studies own Dr. William Cissell, MPH,Ph.D. CHES

30
Summary of Interview with IUHPE Expert Dr.
William Cissell
  • In-person telephone interviews (W. Cissell,
    personal communication, June 23 26, 2003)
  • IUHPE advocacy success collaboration with
    diversity of global health-related agencies
    institutions, avoids politics network
    iernationally recognized experts
  • Dr. Cissell very supportive of proposed
    aging/accessibility health promotion strategy

31
  • A for Accessibility!

32
References
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33
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References
  • World Health Organization. Department of
    Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Health
    Promotion (NPH). (2003d). Towards policy for
    health and ageing. Retrieved June 5, 2003, from
    http//www.who.int/hpr/ageing/ageing.pdf
  • World Health Organization. Tobacco-Free
    Initiative. (2003). Chapter 32 The Future. In
    Tobacco Atlas. Retrieved June 5, 2003, from
    http//www5.who.int/tobacco/repository/stp84/9020
    Map203220The20Future.pdf

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References
  • World Wide Web Consortium. Web Accessibility
    Initiative W3C WAI. (2003a). Retrieved June 26,
    2003, from http//www.w3c.org/wai/
  • World Wide Web Consortium. Web Accessibility
    Initiative W3C WAI. (2003b). Policies relating
    to web accessibility. Retrieved June 26, 2003,
    from http//www.w3.org/WAI/Policy/

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References
  • World Wide Web Consortium. Web Accessibility
    Initiative W3C WAI. (2003c). Web accessibility
    is a marketplace issue. Retrieved June 26, 2003,
    from http//www.w3.org/Talks/WAI-Intro/slide7-0.ht
    ml
  • WorldEnable (2003). Retrieved June 26, 2003,
    from http//www.worldenable.net/about.htm

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Selected Assistive Technology Conferences
  • ATIA http//www.atia.org/
  • CSUN http//www.csun.edu/cod/
  • Closing the Gap http//www.closingthegap.com/
  • RESNA http//www.resna.org/

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Everyone does things differently. Everyone.
82
We all are PEOPLE First.
  • People with feelings.
  • People with hopes.
  • People with strengths.
  • People with differences.

83
We all are People with Differences.
  • People with Learning Differences
  • People with Cognitive Differences
  • People with Mobility Differences
  • People with Vision Differences
  • People with Hearing Differences ...

84
Please see
  • The A Diversity of Differences
  • handout. On the web with active links to
    resources at
  • http//a4access.org/atwhat.html

85
Everyone does things differently. Every Day.
  • Weather
  • Traffic jams
  • Family, friends, work
  • Desire
  • Just because

86
Everyone does things differently because of
  • Birth
  • Illness
  • Accident
  • Natural Disaster
  • Lifestyle Choice, War ... And even if none of
    the above
  • Were all getting older. (Really?)

87
Everyone needs Access. Every Day.
  • Everyone needs
  • To go somewhere.
  • To do something.
  • To have adaptive capacity

88
Everyone uses Assistive Technology. Every Day.
  • Alarm clocks, calendars, organizers
  • Elevators, luggage on wheels, purses
  • Cell phones, pagers, magnets
  • E-mail, adhesive tape, glue, notepads
  • Assistive Technology is Everywhere handout
    http//twu.edu/s_perlow/ateverywhere.html

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Why?
  • Although we share many needs, desires, and
    dreams, we all have diverse needs and interests.
  • We live in a very diverse society.
  • Let us celebrate our diversity!

90
The Power of Universal Design
  • Universal design allows
  • Everyone to do it differently.
  • Everyone to do it as s/he does it best.
  • Everyone to be happy.
  • Universal design, full compatibility, usability,
    and accessibility save everyone !

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Selected Universal Design Sites
  • CAST http//www.cast.org/
  • National Center for Accessible Media
    http//ncam.wgbh.org/
  • TRACE Center http//trace.wisc.edu/
  • NCSU. Center for Universal Design
    http//www.design.ncsu.edu/cud/index.html
  • U.S. Access Board. http//www.access-board.gov/

92
Thank You!
93
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