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Millennial college students: Why they dont act the way you did in college

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Children of baby boomers. Parents wait until later in life, more affluent 'Baby on Board' signs. Marketing to children increases: Barney, Hanson, Spice Girls ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Millennial college students: Why they dont act the way you did in college


1
Millennial college studentsWhy they dont act
the way you did in college
Dr. Jeanna Mastrodicasa Associate Director,
Honors ProgramUniversity of Floridajmastro_at_ufl.e
du
2
Generations
  • Perceived membership in a common generation
  • A set of common beliefs and behaviors
  • A common location in history

3
Generations in the U.S.
  • Lost Generation (born 1883-1900)
  • GI Generation (born 1901-24)
  • Silent Generation (born 1925-42)
  • The Boom Generation (born 1943-60)
  • Generation X (born 1961-81)
  • Millennials (born 1982-now)

4
Millennials The wanted children
  • Children of baby boomers
  • Parents wait until later in life, more affluent
  • Baby on Board signs
  • Marketing to children increases Barney, Hanson,
    Spice Girls
  • Politicians started talking about effects on
    children for first time
  • Helicopter parents

5
Diversity of millennial generation
  • Most racially and ethnically diverse generation
  • 1 out of 5 has at least one immigrant parent 1
    in 10 has at least one non-citizen parent
  • More Latino and Asian youths

6
7 Characteristics of Millennials(Howe and
Strauss)
7
7 Characteristics of Millennials
Sheltered
Special
Achieving
Confident
Team Oriented
Pressured
Conventional
8
Special
  • Large generation with relatively wealthy parents
  • Made important by those who want to sell them a
    service or product
  • Collectively vital to the nation
  • Individually vital to their parents sense of
    purpose
  • Parental involvement in decisions
  • Feedback and structure for students

9
Sheltered
  • Safety and health focus for students
  • Security in residence halls
  • Parents buying homes for students on campus
  • Encouraged to follow rules, so expect enforcement
    and due process
  • Increase in counseling and medical needs
  • Post-Columbine era zero tolerance

10
Confident
  • Positive reinforcement from society believe in
    selves
  • Want to reinvent civic order (9/11)
  • Confident about futuregreater danger and fewer
    rewards for being different than peers
  • High level of trust and optimism
  • Good news for selves good news for country

11
Team-Oriented
  • Millennials like to congregate (DeBard)
  • Learn, deliver presentations, and get graded in
    groups
  • Activities in teams throughout childhood
  • Constant contact with peers via cellphone and IM
  • Believe in mediation, lowers pressure on
    individuals

12
Conventional
  • Focus on big brands (e.g. Ivy League schools)
  • Accept social rules from authority figures
  • More willing to accept adult authority than other
    generations
  • Believe that authority is telling the truth
  • Expect high-stakes proficiency testing

13
Pressured
  • Boomers have created opportunities for them
  • Two top issues of worry for teenagers grades
    and college admissions
  • Intense emphasis on planning future
  • Seek job and life stability
  • Cheating increases
  • Millennials want a structure enforced to ensure
    that compliance will lead to achievement--DeBard

14
Achieving
  • Expect high grades as a reward for compying to
    academic standards
  • SAT scores are the highest since 1974
  • Focus on not falling behind of peers
  • Prefer subjects where one can measure objective
    progress (math, science)
  • Focus on accountability in schools
  • Should become the smartest and best-educated
    generation in U.S. history

15
Mental Health Issues on Campus
  • Data from American College Health Association.
    American College Health Association - National
    College Health
  • Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) Web Summary. Updated
    September 2005. Available at
  • http//www.acha.org/projects_programs/ncha_sampled
    ata.cfm. 2005.

16
2005 Freshman Norms
  • 385 colleges, 263,710 entering college students
    in 2005
  • Top goals family, financial success Lowest
    develop meaningful philosophy in life (high of
    85.5 in 1967)

Hurtado, S., Pryor, J.H. (2006). The American
Freshman National Norms for 2005. retrieved
from www.gseis.ucla.edu/heri/heri.html
17
Social Civic Responsibility
Hurtado, S., Pryor, J.H. (2006). The American
Freshman National Norms for 2005. retrieved
from www.gseis.ucla.edu/heri/heri.html
18
2005 CIRP College-Going Decisions
  • 43.7 cite parents wanted me to go as a very
    important reason

Hurtado, S., Pryor, J.H. (2006). The American
Freshman National Norms for 2005. retrieved
from www.gseis.ucla.edu/heri/heri.html
19
Characteristics of todays parents
  • Protective
  • Want their sons/daughters safe and secure
  • Involved
  • Want to help them achieve
  • Concerned
  • Want them to receive their fair share
  • Intelligent
  • College educated
  • Demanding
  • Savvy customers

20
Student communication with parents UF survey
  • Students call more than parents (53.8) but
    parents e-mail student more (44.1 v. 17.9)
  • About half talk to a parent at least once per day
    (51.7)
  • More than 97 of the respondents have a cell
    phone and so do their parents

21
Very or somewhat frequent topics of conversation
with students/parents UF survey
  • Academic success (79.0)
  • Money (56.6)
  • Social life (55.1)
  • Overview of the day/checking in (52.1)
  • Students health (47.1)
  • Complaints about classes (38.4)
  • Daily classroom life (35.5)
  • Work (29.1)
  • Complaints about living conditions (26.8)
  • Meetings with advisors (12.3)

22
Parents and Preview UF survey
  • At least 31.9 of the students parents were
    fully aware of students intended schedule after
    Preview (29 dont know)
  • 26.8 of students called their parents to discuss
    schedule at Preview
  • 14.5 were surprised to learn that they could not
    be with students at Preview advising and
    registration 5.8 of the parents were upset

23
Implications for advising
  • More than a third (36.2) have changed a course
    selection after discussing it with parents
  • 12.3 of students said they knew their parents
    had called UF to discuss them (17.9 Honors)
  • Of those not in their first semester at UF, 35.5
    said that they discuss their intended schedule
    with parents before advance registration

24
More implications for advising
  • More than a quarter (25.4) send UF mail to
    parents address
  • 13.8 of respondents parents have their
    Gatorlink login information (17.9 Honors)
  • 35.5 have signed a waiver with SFA to share
    financial aid information with parents (46.2
    Honors)

25
Student Communication
  • Internet
  • Instant Messaging
  • Blogging

26
Use of the internet by age group
  • Age
  • 18-29 84
  • 30-49 76
  • 50-64 64
  • 65 27

27
Whos online
  • Household income
  • Less than 30,000/yr 48
  • 30,000-50,000 71
  • 50,000-75,000 85
  • More than 75,000 92

Educational attainment Less than High School
28 High School 57 Some
College 79 College
89
28
IM Use and Multitasking
  • A comparison of Instant Messaging (IM) use and
    multitasking while using IM between generations.
    Source The Pew
  • Internet and American Life Project (2004). How
    Americans use instant messaging.

29
Blogs
  • Web log or blogs are public or semi-public
    journals.
  • Bloggers post their entries and readers can post
    comments.
  • Have been successfully used as alternative media.
  • Xanga, Livejournal, Myspace

30
Blogging
  • From Feb 2004 to Jan 2005 58 increase in blog
    readership overall (PEW Internet and American
    Life Project )
  • 32 million Americans are blog readers
  • About 20,000 new blogs created daily (USA Today)
  • Currently over 10 million blogs.

31
Blog Ownership Readership
A comparison of rates of Blog Ownership and
Readership between all adults who use the
Internet, teenage Boys and Girls, and college
students. Sources The Pew Internet and American
Life Project (2005). Teens as content creators
Mastrodicasa and Kepic (2005).
32
Age Distribution of Livejournal.com Users
  • Source Livejournal.com, November 2005.

33
UF blogs
  • Students are willing to accept advice from other
    online users
  • Live Journal site
  • http//community.livejournal.com/ufstudents/
  • http//community.livejournal.com/gainesville/
  • Several Student Government blogs
  • http//ufview.blogspot.com/
  • http//notanti-greekanti-system.blogspot.com/
  • http//gatorman-uf.blogspot.com/

34
thefacebook.com
  • 9th most visited website on internet
  • 2.8 million registered users
  • 800 colleges and universities80 of colleges in
    US
  • 10K-20K new users per day
  • 300 million page-views in 24-hour period
  • New verb facebooking usage hey, facebook me
  • Security, judicial, time-wasting issues

35
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36
Myspace
  • Top visited website in U.S. (source NPR)
  • Blog with facebook-type friend network
    properties focus on music
  • Any individual can join MySpace is an online
    community that lets you meet your friends'
    friends.
  • Create a private community on MySpace and you can
    share photos, journals and interests with your
    growing network of mutual friends!
  • Now owned by News Corp. (Fox)

37
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38
College Student/Pop Culture websites
  • Connect with other students
  • www.thefacebook.com
  • www.myspace.com
  • www.livejournal.com
  • www.ratemyprofessor.com
  • Fun sites
  • www.youtube.com
  • www.homestarrunner.com

39
Video Games
  • 70 of college students play at least once in a
    while
  • Gamer culture Sony Playstation, Nintendo
    Revolution, Xbox 360
  • Open World video games
  • Connection between Hollywood and the gaming world
  • Popular game Halo

Average age 30!
40
News Sources
  • 2004 news sources for 18-29 year olds
  • 21 Daily Show or Saturday Night Live
  • 23 ABC, CBS, NBC News
  • In 2000 only 9 watched comedy news, with 39
    watching network broadcasts

Pew Research Center for the People and the Press,
2004
41
Suggestions for faculty
  • Student-faculty contact Its not the quantity,
    its the quality
  • Learn names, seek informal contact, talk to
    students outside of the class
  • Encourage class participation in groups assign
    group activities, discussions, learning partners
  • Give more frequent, prompt, and constructive
    feedback

42
More suggestions
  • Emphasize time on taskhelp students gauge the
    amount of necessary effort to reach goals
  • Use a variety of teaching and assessment methods
  • Be clear in syllabus, give well-structured
    assignments, explicit expectations

43
How to use technology
  • Use technology more than just being able to
    make a Powerpoint slide!
  • Use online quizzes, chat capabilities,
    automatically-graded web-based homework
  • Dont assume students know how to use library or
    do research
  • Discuss academic honesty

44
Resources
  • DeBard, R. (2004). Millennials coming to
    college. In M.D. Coomes R. DeBard (Eds.),
    Serving the millennial generation. New
    Directions for Student Services, No. 106, pp.
    33-45. San Francisco Jossey-Bass.
  • Higher Education Research Institute. (2003,
    2004) The American freshman National norms for
    Fall 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006.
  • Howe, N., Strauss, W. (2000). Millennials
    rising The next great generation. New York
    Vintage Books.
  • Howe, N., Strauss, W. (2005). Millennials go
    to college. Washington, DC American
    Association of Collegiate Registrars and
    Admissions officers.
  • Jones, S. (2002, September) The internet goes
    to college How students are living in the
    future with todays technology. Pew Internet and
    American Life Project.

45
Resources
  • Marano, H. E. (2004, November/December). A
    nation of wimps. Psychology Today.
  • Mastrodicasa, J. (2006, February). Facebooking
    The new fad in campus communication. CLAS
    Notes, University of Florida. Retrieved from
    http//clasnews.clas.ufl.edu/news/clasnotes/200602
    /facebooking.html.
  • Murray, J. Serven, S. (2006). FBK 101
    Facebook Basics.
  • Oblinger, D. (2003) Boomers, Gen-Xers,
    Millennials Understanding the new students.
    EDUCAUSE Review, 37-47.
  • Wilson, M. E. (2004). Teaching, learning, and
    millennial students. In M.D. Coomes R. DeBard
    (Eds.), Serving the millennial generation. New
    Directions for Student Services, No. 106, pp.
    59-71. San Francisco Jossey-Bass.

46
Contact me at jmastro_at_ufl.edu
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