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Title: What


1
Whats Nextfor College and Career Transitions
By Hans Meeder
2
Key Points for Discussion
  • What are the Key Challenges in Education?
  • What progress have we made?
  • How do we sustain our progress?

3
Strategic Partnerships
4
What are the key challenges?
5
The 1st High School Tipping Point
1892. The Committee of Ten 1906. National Society
for the Promotion of Industrial Education
(Charles Prosser) 1917. The Smith-Hughes Act
(salaries for vocational teachers and teacher
preparation) 1918. Cardinal Principles of
Secondary Education 1959. Conant report The
American High School Today --- the triumph of
differentiation
6
Miscalculations in the 20th Century High School
Model
? Belief in fixed intelligence and low
expectations, racial and ethnic prejudices ?
Belief in a static economy and slow-changing
workforce demands
See Left Back, A Century of Battles Over School
Reform by Diane Ravitch, 2000
7
High School Achievement -- FLAT
8
The Challenge Math and Science Literacy
  • PISA 2006
  • On average, U.S. students scored lower than the
    OECD average on the combined science literacy
    scale.
  • On average, U.S. students scored lower than the
    OECD average on the mathematics literacy scale.
  • PISA emphasizes functional skills and
    cross-curricular competencies essential for
    growth in business and industry.

9
Employers/Instructors Dissatisfied With High
Schools Skills Prep
(In each area, saying they are somewhat/very
dissatisfied with the job public high schools
are doing preparing graduates)
Employers
Thinking analytically Work and study
habits Applying what is learned in school to
solving problems Computer skills
29 very dissatisfied 22 very dissatisfied16
very dissatisfied 17 very dissatisfied
Source Hart Research Associates, Achieve,
Rising to the Challenge, Jan. 2005
10
Employers/Instructors Dissatisfied With High
Schools Skills Prep
(In each area, saying they are somewhat/very
dissatisfied with the job public high schools
are doing preparing graduates)
Employers
25 very dissatisfied 22 very dissatisfied 24
very dissatisfied 20 very dissatisfied
Reading/understandingcomplicated
materials Quality of writing that is
expected Doing research Mathematics Oral
communication/public speaking Science
Source Hart Research Associates, Achieve,
Rising to the Challenge, Jan. 2005
11
Guidance... Too Little and Too Late
  • These results indicate that as many as 70
    percent of students did not have the strong
    guidance experiences necessary to help them plan
    for the future and eventually enter into either
    postsecondary education or the work force.
  • Source SREB, High Schools That Work

12
What Are the Results?What happens to entering
9th graders four years later
37 Graduate from High School Not College-Ready
29 Dropout of High School
34 Graduate from High School College-Ready
Greene Winters 2005
13
The Silent Epidemic
The Silent Epidemic Perspectives of High School
Dropouts
  • A Report by
  • Civic Enterprises, LLC
  • John M. Bridgeland, John J. DiIulio, Jr., Karen
    Burke Morison

14
Key Findings
  • 88 had passing grades, with 62 percent having Cs
    and above
  • 58 dropped out with just two years or less to
    complete high school
  • 66 would have worked harder if expectations were
    higher
  • 70 were confident they could have graduated
  • 81 recognized graduating was vital to their
    success

Source The Silent Epidemic, 2006
15
Dropouts Did Not Feel Motivated Or Inspired To
Work Hard
  • Did you feel motivated and inspired to work hard
    in high school?

Was notmotivated/inspired
Was motivated/inspired
Notsure
Source The Silent Epidemic, 2006
16
In Todays Workforce, Jobs Require More Education
than Ever Before
Change in the Distribution of Education in
Jobs 1973 v. 2001
-23
-9
16
16
Source Carnevale, Anthony P. and Donna M.
Desrochers, Standards for What? The Economic
Roots of K16 Reform, ETS, 2003. CREATED BY
ACHIEVE, INC.
17
What Progress Have We Made?
18
The Tipping Point
The Three Rules
1. The Law of the Few 2. The Stickiness
Factor 3. The Power of Context
19
Tipping Point Factors
  • 2001. States Career Clusters Initiative
  • 2002. College and Career Transitions
    Initiative
  • 2004. American Diploma ProjectReady or Not
  • 2003-2004. Department of Education High School
    Regional and National Summits
  • 2005. National Governors Association, High School
    Summit

20
Tipping Point Factor State Career Initiatives
21
Tipping Point Factor,The Perkins Act of 2006
  • KEY THEMES
  • CTE Programs of Study
  • State and Local Accountability for Program
    Improvement
  • Tech Prep Accountability and Flexibility
  • Economic and Personal Competitiveness

22
Perkins CTE Programs of Study
  • Builds on Tech Prep, career clusters, career
    pathways, career academies
  • State develops in consultation with locals
  • Each local district and college must offer the
    required courses of at least one Program of
    Study
  • (many states will require that Programs of Study
    become the rule vs. the exception)

23
Montana Career Fields and Clusters Model
Environmental Agricultural Systems
Business Management
Human Services Resources
  • Agriculture, Food, Natural Resources
  • Law, Public Safety and Security
  • Government and Public Administration
  • Human Services
  • Education and Training
  • Marketing, Sales, and Services
  • Business, Management, and Administration
  • Hospitality and Tourism
  • Finance

English (4) Math (2) Science (2)
Social Studies (2) PE (1) Health (1)
Arts (1) Vocational (1)
Career
  • Foundation
  • Knowledge and Skills
  • Interpersonal Relationships
  • Information Literacy
  • Problem Solving
  • Critical Thinking
  • Teamwork

Industrial, Manufacturing, Engineering Systems
Electives
Communication Information Systems
  • Manufacturing
  • Transportation, Distribution Logistics
  • Architecture and Construction
  • Science, Technology, Engineering Mathematics
  • Arts, A/V Technology and Communications
  • Information Technology

Health Sciences
  • Health Science

24
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25
Electronic Tools for College and Career Planning
to
  • Help Students Create Individualized Plans AND
  • Build awareness of the full spectrum of
    post-secondary education and training
    opportunities

26
Tipping Point FactorPolicies that Recognize
Integrated Academics
  • 10 Interdisciplinary courses that meet state
    requirements for academic course taking.
  • Carefully merged academic and career-oriented
    content.
  • Meet Geometry standards Computer-aided
    drafting/geometry and Construction geometry.
  • Meet Life Science standards Agri-biology
    medical science nutritional and food science.
  • Meet Economics standards Business economics
    consumer economics.
  • Source Kentucky State Department of Education,
    www.education.ky.gov/KDE/default.htm

27
Tipping Point Factor The World is Flat, A
Brief History of the 21st Century by Thomas L.
Friedman
28
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29
Tipping Point FactorIncreasing recognition in
the general education community
30
Tipping Point FactorState Initiatives
  • California. 2005. S.B., 20 million in new CTE
    funding, 2007. 32 million in new CTE funding
    proposed. Governors CTE Summit.
  • South Carolina, 2005. Legislature approves
    Education and Economic Development Act.
  • Offers academic standards within career majors
    for every student.
  • Every student will create an individual plan for
    graduation and beyond.

31
Tipping Point FactorState Initiatives
  • Washington State, 2006. State legislature
    recognizes CTE as part of collection of evidence
    for alternative form of WASL assessment.
  • Florida, 2006. State legislature approves A
    Plan.
  • High school students will select an area of
    interest as part of their personalized education
    and career plan.
  • Students will earn four credits in a major area
    of interest.

32
Tipping Point FactorSchools That are Getting It
Done
  • Polytech High School
  • Woodside, Delaware
  • High Tech High,
  • San Diego, California
  • Granger High School
  • Granger, Washington
  • si puede It can be done

33
Kirkwood Community College Cedar Rapids, Iowa
  • Advanced Manufacturing Automotive Technology
  • Automotive Collision Engineering
  • Welding Health Science
  • EMT-B Pharmacy Technician
  • Ed. Human Services Graphics Media Comm.
  • Information Systems Mgmt. Local Area Networking
  • Computer Programming Geospatial Tech. start
    2007-08
  • Culinary start 2007-08 Biomedical Science
    start 2007-08

34
PLTW Building the U.S. Engineering Talent
Pipeline
  • Project Lead the Way, 4-year pre-engineering
    curriculum
  • Key attributes
  • Project-based learning with rigorous academics
  • End-of-course assessment to validate quality of
    instruction
  • Intensive Professional Development
  • Articulated college credits
  • Community College associates degree program
  • 1997-98, 12 NY high schools.
  • 2005-06, 1300 High Schools in 45 states and DC

35
Tipping Point Factors
  • 2000. Creation of the Bill and Melinda Gates
    Foundation

36
American Diploma Project, 29 states
  • KEY PRIORITIES
  • Raise high school standards to the level of what
    is actually required to succeed in college or in
    the workforce.
  • Require all students to take rigorous college and
    work-ready curriculum.
  • Develop tests of college and work readiness that
    all students will take in high school.
  • Hold high schools accountable for graduating all
    students ready for college and work, and hold
    colleges accountable for the success of the
    students they admit.

37
Downloadable copy available www.acteonline.org
38
How do we sustain our progress?
39
The Tipping Point
The Three Rules
1. The Law of the Few 2. The Stickiness
Factor 3. The Power of Context
40
The Innovation and Adoption Cycle
41
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42
The Law of the FewConnectors, Mavens, Salesmen
43
The Rules of The Tipping Point
  • Making an idea or attitude or product tip can be
    done through the influence of special kinds of
    people. Thats the Law of the Few.
  • It can be done by changing the content of
    communication, by making a message so memorable
    that it sticks in someones mind and compels them
    to action. That is the Stickiness Factor.
  • But we need to remember that small changes in
    context can be just as important in tipping
    epidemics (Ch. 4).

44
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45
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46
Technical Change vs. Adaptive Change
  • Technical Change
  • Curriculum content
  • Creating career clusters and pathway models
  • Creating articulation agreements
  • Creating state and local policy for dual credit,
    shared programs
  • Adaptive Change
  • Belief that all students can learn
  • Belief that teachers/schools can make a
    difference
  • Teacher as coach/mentor
  • Collaboration among teachers, institutions

47
Those of us who are doing work on leadership and
change frequently dont appreciate sufficiently
the sources of resistance. We frequently fail to
have enough respect for the pain of these
adjustments and changes.
Conversation with Ronald Heifetz, Harvard
Kennedy School of Government June 23rd, 1999,
Claus Otto Scharm
48
8 Biggest Errors in Leading Change
  • 1. Not establishing a great enough sense of
    urgency
  • 2. Not creating a powerful enough leadership team
  • 3. Lacking a vision
  • 4. Under-communicating the vision

John Kotter, Leading Change, Harvard Business
School Press
49
8 Errors, continued
  • 5. Not removing obstacles to the new vision
  • 6. Not systematically planning for and creating
    short-term wins
  • 7. Declaring victory too soon
  • 8. Not anchoring changes in the organizations
    culture

50
In the end, my biggest culture change goal was
to induce IBMers to believe in themselves again,
to believe that they had the ability to determine
their own fate, and that they already knew what
they needed to know. It was to shake them out of
their depressed stupor, remind them of who they
were -- youre IBM, dammit -- and get them
thinking and acting collaboratively as hungry,
curious, self-starters.
Louis V. Gerstner, Who Says Elephants Cant
Dance?, Harper Audio.
51
I knew the leader of the revolution would have
to be me. I had to commit to thousands of hours
of personal activity to pull it off. I would
have to be upfront and outspoken about what I was
doing. We all had to talk directly about culture,
behavior and beliefs. We could not be subtle.
Louis V. Gerstner, Who Says Elephants Cant
Dance?, Harper Audio.
52
Measure and reward the future, not the past...
Leaders who are thinking about creating true
integration in their institution must change the
measurement and reward systems to reinforce this
new direction.
Louis V. Gerstner, Who Says Elephants Cant
Dance?, Harper Audio.
53
Urgency -- What Do We Want for Our Students and
Schools?
  • Rigor
  • Where we believe in the ability of students to
    learn at high levels and make every effort to get
    them there
  • Relevance
  • Where we engage students in their passion for
    learning and life
  • Relationships
  • Where every youth knows he or she matters to
    someone

54
I got you the iPod that I promised you, and for
your convenience, Ive welded it to the lawn
mower.
55
Creating a New Hybrid of CTE with College
Readiness Expectations
Heterosis/Hybrid Vigor the possibility to
obtain a better individual by combining the
virtues of its parents
56
Which One are You?
  • Connectors
  • People with a special gift of bringing the world
    together SOCIAL GLUE SPREAD MESSAGE
  • Mavens
  • They accumulate knowledge and have the social
    skills to start word-of-mouth epidemics DATA
    BANKS PROVIDE THE MESSAGE
  • Salesmen, They persuade us
  • The Message Stickiness
  • The Context - Policy

57
  • Few will have the greatness to bend history
    itself but each of us can work to change a small
    portion of events, and in the total of all those
    acts will be written the history of this
    generation.
  • -- Robert F. Kennedy

58
For more information about presentations and
state and local consulting services,
contact Email Hans_at_MeederConsulting.com Web
www.MeederConsulting.com
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