Module I: Introduction - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Module I: Introduction PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 4f17d-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Module I: Introduction

Description:

Identify the relevant goals and objectives of Healthy People 2010. 4 ... Healthy People 2010 ... Theresa Madden, DDS, PhD, OHSU. Marianne Marcus, RN, EdD, UT-Houston ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:52
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 72
Provided by: jud130
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Module I: Introduction


1
Module I Introduction
Project MAINSTREAM
November 2005
2
Purposes
  • Provide an overview and rationale for the
    program.
  • Introduce the curriculum developed for the
    programs.
  • Identify the accomplishments of the first five
    years of the initiative.

3
Learning Objectives
  • Health Care Professionals will be able to
  • Discuss the program rationale.
  • Identify the relevant goals and objectives of
    Healthy People 2010.

4
Learning Objectives (continued)
  • Health Care Professionals will be able to
  • Define the role of health care professionals in
    meeting the challenge of substance use disorders.
  • List the basic substance use related competencies
    germane to all health care professionals.

5
Learning Objectives (continued)
  • Discuss the recommendations of the Strategic
    Planning Document of the HRSA-AMERSA-CSAT/SAMHSA
    Interdisciplinary Program to improve Health
    Professional Education in Substance Abuse.
  • Discuss the organization and accomplishments of
    the Faculty Fellowship component of the program.
  • Discuss a model of the process of cultural
    competence.
  • Identify evolving trends in prevention and
    treatment of substance use disorders.

6
Outline of Syllabus
  • Module 1 Introduction
  • Module 2 Overview of Substance Use
  • Disorders
  • Module 3 Screening and Assessment
  • Module 4 Intervention and Referral
  • Module 5 Motivational Interviewing
  • Module 6 Prescription Drug Abuse

7
Outline of Syllabus (continued)
  • Module 7 Identifying and Assisting
    Children of Substance Abusing
    Parents
  • Module 8 Substance Abuse and the Elderly
  • Module 9 Community-Based Substance Abuse
    Prevention
  • Module 10 Population Health and Substance
    Abuse
  • Module 11 Curriculum and Evaluation

8
Program Overview and Rationale
  • HRSA-AMERSA-SAMHSA/CSAT Interdisciplinary Program
    in Substance Abuse Education

9
Substance Use Disorders
  • 119 million (50.1) American aged 12 or older use
    alcohol.
  • 54 million (22.6) binge drink
  • 16.1 million (16.8) drink heavily.

  • (NSDUH, 2004)

10
Substance Abuse Disorders
  • 19.5 million (8.2) use illicit drugs
  • 70.8 million (29.8) use tobacco
  • NSDUH, 2004
  • Overall drug and tobacco use among teens has
    declined but inhalant and vicodin use has
    increased.
  • (MTF, 2004)

11
Healthy People (HP) 2000 Goals Reached
  • Increase in average age of first marijuana use
  • Decline in cocaine use

12
HP 2000 Goals Some Progress
  • Alcohol-related crashes
  • Average age of first cigarette
  • Alcohol use - ages 12 to 20
  • Tobacco use - ages 12 to 17

13
HP 2000 Goals No Progress
  • Average age of first alcohol use
  • Marijuana use - ages 12 to 25
  • Heavy drinking - high school students
  • Heavy drinking - college students

14
HP 2000 Goals Regression
  • Drug-related emergency room visits
  • Drug-related deaths, especially among African
    Americans and Hispanic Americans

15
Healthy People 2010
  • Reduce substance abuse to protect health, safety
    and quality of life for all, especially children
    (25 objectives related to this goal).
  • Reduce illness, disability, and death related to
    tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke (21
    objectives related to this goal).
  • Other goals relate indirectly.

16
Healthy People 2010 -Indirect Goals/Objectives
  • Access to Quality Health Services
  • 1-3 Counseling about health behaviors.
  • 1-7 Core competencies in health provider
    training.
  • Educational and Community-Based Programs
  • 7-2 School health education.
  • 7-3 Health-risk behavior information for college
    and university students.
  • 7-5 Worksite health promotion programs.
  • 7-6 Older adult participation in
    employer-sponsored health promotion activities.

17
Healthy People 2010 -Indirect Goals/Objectives
(continued)
  • Educational and Community-Based Programs
    (continued)
  • 7-7 Patient and family education.
  • 7-10 Community health promotion programs.
  • 7-11 Cultural appropriate community health
    promotion programs.
  • HIV Prevention
  • 13-8 HIV counseling and education for persons in
    substance abuse treatment.

18
Healthy People 2010 -Indirect Goals/Objectives
(continued)
  • Injury and Violence Prevention
  • 15-15 Deaths from motor vehicle crashes
  • 15-32 Homicides
  • 15-34 Physical assault by intimate partners
  • 15-35 Rape or attempted rape
  • Maternal, Infant, and Child Health
  • 16-17 Prenatal substance exposure
  • 16-18 Fetal alcohol syndrome.

19
Healthy People 2010 -Indirect Goals/Objectives
(continued)
  • Mental Health and Mental Disorders
  • 18-10 Treatment for co-occurring disorders.
  • Occupational Safety and Health
  • 20-9 Worksite stress reduction programs.
  • Public Health Infrastructure
  • 23-8 Competencies for public health workers.
  • 23-17 Prevention research.
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • 25-11 Responsible adolescent sexual behavior.

20
Workforce Deficiencies
  • Primary and secondary substance abuse prevention
    is effective
  • Few health care professionals engage regularly in
    primary and secondary prevention
  • All of the U.S. is underserved with regard to
    substance abuse services

21
Needs
  • Routine screening, brief intervention, and
    referral
  • Identification and assistance for affected family
    members
  • Attention to substance use by elderly
  • Health professional involvement in community
    prevention efforts

22
Barriers
  • Insufficient emphasis on substance abuse in
    education and training
  • Health professional workforce is deficient in
    basic competencies
  • Insufficient numbers of faculty able to teach and
    model these competencies

23
Previous Faculty Development Programs (FDPs)
  • NIAAA, NIDA, HRSA, CSAP
  • Effective for many participants
  • Some ripple effects
  • Short-lived limited sites
  • Federal effort not coordinated
  • Little interdisciplinary synergy

24
Main Objectives
  • Produce a strategic plan for health professional
    education and training
  • Conduct a faculty devel. program for fellows from
    multiple disciplines
  • Build regional training and national electronic
    communication networks

25
Targeted Disciplines
  • Dentists
  • Dieticians
  • Nurses
  • Nurse Midwives
  • Nurse Practitioners
  • Occup. Therapists
  • Pharmacists
  • Physical Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Physician Assistants
  • Psychologists
  • Public Health
  • Social Workers
  • Speech path/audiologists

26
Strategic Planning Document
  • Magnitude of problem
  • Effective ways to address problem
  • Health care professionals involvement
  • State of health professional education
  • Trends in health care delivery
  • Recommendations for all disciplines
  • Discipline-specific recommendations

27
Strategic Planning Document (continued)
  • For all recommendations
  • Rationale
  • Responsible parties
  • Suggestions for implementation

28
Strategic Planning Staff
  • Director of Strategic Planning
  • Mary Haack, RN, PhD, Assoc. Prof.
  • Rutgers University School of Nursing
  • Associate Director of Strategic Planning
  • Hoover Adger, MD, Assoc. Prof.
  • Johns Hopkins Univ. Medical School
  • Professional Editor
  • Linda Harteker, MA

29
Strategic Planning Advisory Committee
  • Addict. Psych. - Kathleen Brady, MD, PhD
  • Allied Health - John Bonaguro, PhD
  • Allopathic Med. - David Lewis, MD
  • Dentistry - Arden Christen, DDS, MSD, MA
  • Geriatrics - Kristen Barry, PhD
  • Nursing - Madeline Naegle, RN, PhD
  • Nurse Midwife - Pat Paluzzi, CNM, DrPH

30
Strategic Planning Advisory Committee (continued)
  • Nurse Pract. - Elias Vasquez, PhD, NNP
  • Osteopathic Med. - Richard Butler, DO
  • Pharmacy - Ernest Dole, PharmD
  • Phys. Asst - C. Judd, PA-C P.Morgan, PA-C
  • Psychology William Miller, PhD
  • Public Health - Chris Ringwalt, MSW, DrPH
  • Social Work - Lala Straussner, DSW

31
Project Goals for Health Care Professionals
Faculty Development
  • Improve and expand substance abuse curricula in
    health professional schools and training programs
    in order to Produce health professionals who
    will help the U.S. meet its Healthy People 2010
    goals on substance use/abuse

32
Primary Learning Objectives
  • Clinic-based screening, assessment, intervention,
    and referral
  • Clinic-based identification and assistance of
    children and adolescents with affected parents
  • Community-based prevention

33
Other Important Learning Areas
  • Geriatric issues
  • Population health
  • Prescription Drug Abuse
  • Pedagogy
  • Curriculum design and evaluation
  • Presentation/publication

34
Role of Health Care Professionals
  • Basic competencies germane to all health care
    professionals
  • Overview of substance use disorders
  • Screening and assessment
  • Intervention and referral
  • Motivational interviewing
  • Identifying and assisting children of substance
    abusing parents
  • Recognizing and assisting elderly substance
    abusers
  • Community-based substance abuse prevention
  • Recognizing population trends in substance use
    disorders.
  • Level of competency varies by profession

35
Interfaculty Fellow Learning Groups (IFLGs)
  • Faculty apply as interdisciplinary faculty
    learning groups
  • 3 faculty fellows per IFLG with geographic
    proximity
  • Each IFLG has 3 disciplines
  • Collaborative projects

36
Regional Structure Cohort 1 2
Regional Director
Mentor
Mentor
Fellow
Fellow
Fellow
Fellow
Fellow
Fellow
37
FDP Learning Activities
  • AMERSA National Conference plus special FDP
    workshops
  • Spring regional meetings
  • Annual mentor visits
  • Learning contract
  • Monthly contacts with mentors

38
FDP Learning Activities (continued)
  • Interdisciplinary clinical and educational
    projects
  • Interactions with IFLG
  • FDP distance learning activities
  • Present projects at meetings
  • Publish peer-reviewed articles

39
Evaluation Team
  • Rebecca Henry, Ph.D.
  • Rich Brown, MD, MPH
  • Monina Lahoz, PhD
  • Marianne Marcus, RN, EdD
  • Jeff Morzinski, PhD
  • Gene Schoener, PhD

40
Evaluation Plan
  • Administrative, process, and outcome measures
  • Outcomes evaluation driven by objectives

41
Evaluation - Strategic Planning
  • Process
  • Administration runs smoothly
  • Meetings achieve aims
  • Outcome
  • Reviewers rate document highly
  • Document receives publicity
  • Document stimulates change

42
Evaluation - Fellowship
  • Administrative
  • Planning occurs on schedule
  • Fellow mentor recruiting succeeds re numbers
    and diversity
  • Fellow-Mentor contacts occur
  • Mentor-Director contacts occurs
  • Fellows exhibit consistent progress

43
Evaluation - Fellowship (continued)
  • Process - Fellows
  • Application process
  • Expectations - clear and appropriate
  • Training events
  • Mentor contacts
  • Accessibility of guidance
  • Overall experience

44
Evaluation - Fellowship (continued)
  • Process - Mentors
  • Selection process
  • Involvement with fellows
  • Progress of fellows
  • Support from project
  • Compensation
  • Overall experience

45
Evaluation - Fellowship (continued)
  • Process - Activities
  • Participant satisfaction
  • Best aspects suggestions
  • Process - Infrastructure
  • Awareness, use, suggestions
  • Activities, income

46
Evaluation - Fellowship (continued)
  • Knowledge and Attitude Outcomes
  • 30-item knowledge test
  • SAAS treatment optimism
  • Readiness to change clinical and field practices

47
Evaluation - Fellowship (continued)
  • Competency Outcomes
  • Self-efficacy and confidence
  • OSCE stations
  • Presentations
  • Publications

48
Evaluation - Fellowship (continued)
  • Curricular Outcomes
  • Teaching activities
  • Trainee contacts - number, time
  • Curricular presence

49
Evaluation - Fellowship (continued)
  • Distance Learning Programs
  • Knowledge objectives
  • Attitude objectives
  • Competency objectives

50
Evaluation - Fellowship (continued)
  • Career Emphasis Outcomes
  • Professional time allocations
  • Professional organizations
  • Professional activities

51
Fellowship Administration
  • Fellowship Director
  • Marianne T. Marcus, RN, EdD, Professor
  • UT-Houston School of Nursing
  • Associate Director of Fellowship
  • Richard L. Brown, MD, MPH, Assoc. Prof.
  • University of Wisconsin Medical School

52
Regional Directors
  • Toni Graham, RN, MSW, PhD, CWRU
  • Theresa Madden, DDS, PhD, OHSU
  • Marianne Marcus, RN, EdD, UT-Houston
  • Gene Schoener, PhD, Wayne State Univ. (website)
  • Lala Straussner, DSW, New York Univ.

53
Syllabus
  • Designed and edited by Judie Pfeifer, MEd
  • Borrowed from previous syllabi on substance abuse
  • Tailored for multidisciplinary use
  • Updated with recent articles

54
Fellowship Advisory Committee
  • Addict. Psych. - John Chappel, MD
  • Allied Health - John Bonaguro, PhD
  • Allopathic Med. - Michael Fleming, MD, MPH
  • Dentistry - Karen Crews, DMD
  • Geriatrics - Allison Moore, MD
  • Nursing - Madeline Naegle, RN, PhD
  • Nurse Midwife - Pat Palluzi, CNM, DrPH

55
Fellowship Advisory Committee (continued)
  • Nurse Practitioner - Elias Vasquez, PhD, NNP
  • Ostoepathic Med. - Richard Butler, DO
  • Pharmacy - Anthony Tommasello, PharmD
  • Physician Asst - Janice Cooney, PA-C
  • Psychology - Bruce Liese, PhD
  • Public Health - Chris Ringwalt, MSW, DrPH
  • Social Work - Lenore Kola, PhD

56
Administrative Group
  • Project Director
  • Richard L. Brown, MD, MPH
  • Project Manager
  • Doreen MacLane-Baeder
  • Project Assistants
  • Christine Benz, June Daws

57
Initial Project Officer Team
  • Dr. Ruth Kahn, Lead
  • Dr. Mildred Brooks-McDow
  • Dr. Marcia Starbecker
  • Dr. Suzanne Cable
  • Dr. Terri Spears

58
Accomplishments
  • Strategic Plan published 2002.
  • Website now a valuable resource.
  • Thirty-nine faculty fellows from 20 institutions
    trained.

59
Faculty Development Project MAINSTREAM
  • Two cohorts 39 fellows 13 IFLGs
  • 10 physicians
  • 4 social workers
  • 11 nurses
  • 3 dentist
  • 2 physicians assistants
  • 2 psychologists
  • 3 public health professionals
  • 2 pharmacists
  • 2 occupational therapists

60
Accomplishments - Curriculum
  • 10,170 trainees reached by fellows.
  • Based on clinical caseloads in generalist
    settings approximately 126,275 patients could be
    reached by trainees daily.
  • 66,995 hours of substance abuse content offered.
  • Each trained received 6.58 hours of instruction.

61
Evaluation
  • Training experience evaluated positively.
  • Mentoring rated positively.
  • Interdisciplinary collaboration valued.
  • Grants, manuscripts and evidence of durable
    career change reported.
  • New modules added based on fellow feedback.

62
Website Development
  • Valuable resource for Project MAINSTREAM.
  • Used by academics and organizations outside of
    project.
  • www.projectmainstream.net

63
HRSA-AMERSA-SAMHSA/CSAT Model
  • Shows promise for improving services in
    generalist health care settings.
  • Strategic Plan and website are valuable
    resources.
  • Project MAINSTREAM results in impressive outcomes.

64
Cultural Competence
  • Increased concern for cultural competence among
    all health care disciplines.
  • Impetus concern for adequacy of services for
    members of ethnic minority groups.
  • Flexible changing process.
  • Each person is unique within their culture.

65
Culture
  • Sum total of a groups lifeways, including
    material culture, world view, social
    organization, symbols, status, child raising,
    language, technology and citizenship.
    (Westermeyer, 1999)
  • Acquired by experience.
  • Transmitted from one generation to another.

66
Ethnicity
  • ...peoples from diverse cultural groups who
    share a common culture (Westermeyer, 1999).
  • Characteristics identity with a national
    origin, religious practice, language besides
    English, dress, diet, non-national holidays or
    ceremonials, family rituals, etc. (prescribed
    and proscribed substance use).

67
Subculture
  • Group within the culture with distinct
    characteristics but cannot exist independent of
    the group.
  • Subcultures and substance use crack houses,
    opium dens, taverns, cocktail lounge.

68
A Culturally Competent Model of Care
69
Diversity Within Culture
  • Age
  • Gender
  • Level of acculturation
  • Generation
  • first generation
  • second generation
  • Sexual orientation
  • Rural/Urban

70
Changing Frontiers in Prevention and Treatment
  • Faith-based settings
  • Family drug courts
  • Criminal justice treatment initiatives
  • Complementary and alternative therapies

71
Summary
  • Overview and rationale
  • Healthy People 2010
  • Role of health care professionals
  • Accomplishments of HRSA-AMERSA-SAMHSA/CSAT
    Program
  • Cultural competence
  • Changing frontiers
About PowerShow.com