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EFNEP Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program Gail M. Hanula, EdS, RD, LD, Coordinator

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... clients recognize the importance of each food group and consume a minimum of 3 ... 1 serving from each of the other food groups (fruit, vegetables, milk and meat) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: EFNEP Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program Gail M. Hanula, EdS, RD, LD, Coordinator


1
EFNEPExpanded Food and Nutrition Education
ProgramGail M. Hanula, EdS, RD, LD, Coordinator
  • The University of Georgia
  • Cooperative Extension
  • Colleges of Agricultural and Environmental
    Sciences and
  • Family and Consumer Sciences, cooperating

2
FACS Extension
  • Land Grant universities, including UGA, have a
    3-fold mission
  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Service/Outreach
  • Cooperative Extension
  • Federal, State and local partnership.
  • Offices in almost every county in Georgia.

3
UGA Cooperative Extension
  • Funded to provide research based information.
  • Agriculture - farm, industry and home
  • 4-H 50 project emphasis areas, including fine
    arts, science, health and foods and nutrition
  • Family and Consumer Sciences parenting and child
    care, human development, resource management,
    housing, food safety, nutrition

4
EFNEPTeaching Healthy Eating on a Budget
  • EFNEP is federally funded by USDA through
    Extension (CSREES) to provide foods and nutrition
    education to clients with limited resources in
    order to improve their health.

5
24 Georgia Counties
  • Appling
  • Bibb
  • Brooks
  • Bulloch
  • Chatham
  • Clarke
  • Clayton
  • Colquitt
  • Cook
  • DeKalb
  • Dougherty
  • Fulton
  • Glynn
  • Gwinnett
  • Hall
  • Johnson
  • Liberty
  • Lowndes
  • Muscogee
  • Richmond
  • Walton
  • Ware
  • Washington
  • Wayne

6
Audiences
  • Youth
  • Fun food and nutrition experiences for preschool
    and school-age youth in HeadStart, Pre-K
    programs, childcare centers, community centers,
    4-H clubs and schools.
  • Adults
  • Class series offered to individuals or small
    groups, often in cooperation with community
    agencies such as DHR Office of Family
    Independence, GED programs, Welfare to Work
    programs, food banks, shelters, Teenage Mothers
    Programs and WIC.

7
EFNEP Adult Program
  • Helps low-income families with children
  • Learn how to eat healthier meals and snacks.
  • Stretch their food dollars.
  • Reduce the risk of food borne illness.

8
2006 EFNEP Highlights
  • EFNEP reached 3,726 families
  • 2,465 adults graduated
  • 89 of graduates improved their diets.

9
Prenatal/TAMS
  • 222 pregnant women reached.
  • Pregnant teens enrolled in our Teenage Mothers
    Program on Nutrition (TAMS).
  • The importance of breastfeeding is highlighted.

10
Nutrition Highlights FY 06
  • A goal is to help clients recognize the
    importance of each food group and consume a
    minimum of 3 servings of grains and 1 serving
    from each of the other food groups (fruit,
    vegetables, milk and meat).
  • 3-1-1-1-1 Pattern increased from 17.2 at entry
    to 29.6 at exit
  • 6-2-3-2-2 Pattern increased from 1.9 at entry to
    4.7 at exit

11
Family Meals and Snacks
  • Clients eating 3 or more meals and snacks
    increased from 75 to 82.
  • 53 of clients had children under the age of 5.

12
Food Group Improvement
  • Breads 5.1 5.2
  • Fruits 1.1 1.6
  • Vegetables 3.0 3.4
  • Dairy .9 1.1
  • Meats 2.2 2.3
  • Others 15.5 15.8

13
Calories do count...
  • Adding fruits, vegetables and grains is great,
    but...
  • Calorie levels increased by 166 calories, from
    1852 to 1880 (1679 in 2002).
  • Pattern could lead to weight gain.
  • Focus on substituting fruits, vegetables and
    grains for high calorie desserts and snacks.

14
Reducing Chronic Disease
  • Dietary fat decreased from 36 to 34
  • Dietary fiber increased from 13 to 15 grams/day

15
Food Resources
  • Amount of money spent on food decreased 38/month
    per family
  • 366 families enrolled in one or more food
    assistance programs as a result of EFNEP

16
Behavior Surveys
  • 92 of clients completed
  • pre and post surveys
  • Improvements in food resource management,
    nutrition practices, and food safety

17
Food Resource Management
  • 49 more often planned meals
  • 41 more often compared prices
  • 40 less often ran out of food
  • 45 more often used a list
  • Overall, 79 showed improvement in 1 food
    resource mgt. practices

18
Nutrition Practices
  • ? 42 more often thought about healthy food
    choices when making food decisions
  • 37 more often prepared meals without added salt
  • 58 more often used the Nutrition Facts label

19
Nutrition Practices, contd
  • 33 reported their children more often ate
    breakfast
  • 85 showed improvement in 1 nutrition practices

20
Food Safety
  • 31 or more followed recommended practices of
    not allowing meat dairy foods to sit out more
    than 2 hours
  • 53 more often did not thaw foods at room
    temperature
  • 63 showed improvement in 1 food safety practices

21
Youth
  • 5585 youth reached
  • 99 reached through groups
  • 55 under 6
  • 27 9-12 year olds
  • 933 (18) participated in regular 4-H programs

22
Volunteers
  • 605 volunteers for EFNEP in 2006
  • Equals 4.8 full time positions!
  • 3 were former EFNEP participants

23
EFNEP Website
  • www.eatwellga.com
  • Publications
  • Call your local Cooperative Extension Service to
    find out if EFNEP is in your area.
  • 1-800-ASK-UGA1
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