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NE WI Consortium School Wide Positive Behavior Intervention Strategies Fran RennMalcheski CESA 7 RSN

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880 students - reported over 5,100 office discipline referrals in one academic year ... Foreman High School Office Discipline Referrals by Month by Year ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: NE WI Consortium School Wide Positive Behavior Intervention Strategies Fran RennMalcheski CESA 7 RSN


1
NE WI Consortium School Wide Positive Behavior
Intervention StrategiesFran Renn-MalcheskiCESA
7 RSN Project Director
2
Positive Behavior Intervention Support (PBIS)
  • A broad range of proactive, systemic, and
    individualized strategies for achieving important
    social and learning outcomes in safe and
    effective environments while preventing problem
    behavior with all students (Sugai, 2007).
  • PBIS is an evidence-based practice.
  • For the research article please go to
    www.pbis.org Select online library, select
    research literature, and click on Evidence Based
    Research on School-wide Positive Behavior
    Support.

3
Origins of PBIS
  • Fern Ridge Middle School, Eugene, OR, 1994 A
    school in need of a systems approach to
    discipline
  • 880 students - reported over 5,100 office
    discipline referrals in one academic year
  • Rob Horner, George Sugai and Anne Todd,
    Professors at University of Oregon, focus Fern
    Ridge Middle School on the research regarding
    effective practices.
  • The Positive Behavior Interventions Supports
    (PBIS) process begins and the National Center for
    PBIS was formed!

4
PBIS Schools Over Ten Years Trained and
Partially or Fully Implementing
5
  • Kids these days . . .
  • How are kids different today than when you were a
    kid (remember the other kids)?
  • How are they the same?
  • What do kids today need to succeed?
  • How do we get kids what they need to succeed?

6
School-Wide Systems for Student SuccessA
Response to Intervention (RtI) Model
Academic Systems
Behavioral Systems
  • Tier 3/Tertiary Interventions 1-5
  • Individual students
  • Assessment-based
  • High intensity
  • 1-5 Tier 3/Tertiary Interventions
  • Individual students
  • Assessment-based
  • Intense, durable procedures
  • Tier 2/Secondary Interventions 5-15
  • Some students (at-risk)
  • High efficiency
  • Rapid response
  • Small group interventions
  • Some individualizing
  • 5-15 Tier 2/Secondary Interventions
  • Some students (at-risk)
  • High efficiency
  • Rapid response
  • Small group interventions
  • Some individualizing
  • Tier 1/Universal Interventions 80-90
  • All students
  • Preventive, proactive
  • 80-90 Tier 1/Universal Interventions
  • All settings, all students
  • Preventive, proactive

Illinois PBIS Network, Revised May 15, 2008.
Adapted from What is school-wide PBS? OSEP
Technical Assistance Center on Positive
Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Accessed
at http//pbis.org/school-wide.htm
7
Positive Behavior Interventions SupportsA
Response to Intervention (RtI) Model







  • Tier 2/Secondary
  • Tier 3/
  • Tertiary

Small Group Interventions (CICO, SAIG, etc)
ODRs, Attendance, Tardies, Grades, DIBELS, etc.
Group Interventions with Individualized Focus
(CnC, etc)
Daily Progress Report (DPR) (Behavior and
Academic Goals)

Simple Individual Interventions (Brief FBA/BIP,
Schedule/ Curriculum Changes, etc)
Competing Behavior Pathway, Functional
Assessment Interview, Scatter Plots, etc.

Multiple-Domain FBA/BIP

SIMEO Tools HSC-T, RD-T, EI-T
Wraparound
Illinois PBIS Network, Revised Sept.,
2008 Adapted from T. Scott, 2004
8
Continuum of Support for Tier 2/Secondary-Tier
3/Tertiary Level Systems
  • Small group interventions Check-in Check-Out
    (CICO), social/academic instructional groups
    (SAIG), tutor/homework clubs, etc.
  • Group interventions with individualized focus
    Utilizing a unique feature for an individual
    student, e.g. CICO individualized into a Check
    Connect (CnC), mentoring/tutoring, etc.
  • Simple individual interventions A simple
    individualized function-based behavior support
    plan for a student focused on one specific
    behavior, e.g. brief FBA/BIP-one behavior
    curriculum adjustment schedule or other
    environmental adjustments, etc.
  • Multiple-domain FBA/BIP A complex function-based
    behavior support plan across settings, e.g.
    FBA/BIP home and school and/or community
  • Wraparound A more complex and comprehensive
    plan that addresses multiple life domain issues
    across home, school and community, e.g. basic
    needs, MH treatment, behavior/academic
    interventions, as well as multiple behaviors

Illinois PBIS Network, Revised Sept., 2008
9
Examples of Family/Community Partnerships at All
Three Tiers
10
Why Choose PBIS ?Federal MandatesIDEA
2004NCLB Best PracticesResearched-based Data
drivenStandards Aligned Curriculum Family
InvolvementDISCIPLINE TIME LOST TEACHING
11
?
Social Competence Academic Achievement
Positive Behavior Support
OUTCOMES
Supporting Decision Making
Supporting Staff Behavior
DATA
SYSTEMS
PRACTICES
Adapted from What is a systems Approach in
school-wide PBS? OSEP Technical Assistance
on Positive Behavioral Interventions
and Supports. Accessed at http//www. Pbis.org/sch
oolwide.htm
Supporting Student Behavior
12
Processnot a curriculum
  • Individualized to the unique features of the
    school
  • Emphasis on continuous, data-based improvement
  • Focus on efficiency, effectiveness, relevance

13
1. Systems - How Things are Done
  • Procedures for non-classroom settings (lunchroom,
    bus, bathroom, assembly, transition/hallway)
  • Procedures for reinforcing expected behavior
  • Procedures for responding to office discipline
    referrals.
  • Procedures for meeting the needs of all students
    (AKA., The Triangle)

14
2. Data -- How Decisions Are Made
  • Components of decision making with PBIS
  • A problem-solving team
  • Data at every meeting no older than 48 hour
  • Data collection
  • T-chart
  • ODR form
  • Data use
  • Big Five reports
  • Communication with school community about data,
    patterns, and decisions

15
3. Practices - How Staff Interact with Students
  • Every time any adult interacts with any student,
    it is an instructional moment!
  • PBIS emphasizes
  • Teaching behaviors like we teach academics
  • Modeling and practicing expected behaviors
  • Reinforcing expected behaviors
  • Precorrecting to ensure positive behaviors are
    displayed
  • - Actively supervising to prevent problem
    behaviors

16
Tier1/Universal Practices of PBIS
  • Define
  • 3-5 school-wide expectations
  • rules show what the expectations look like
  • Teach/Pre-correct
  • cool tools/ behavior lesson plans direct
    instruction
  • in-the-moment reminders
  • Model/Practice
  • adults model what they teach
  • students practice what we teach
  • Acknowledge
  • daily recognition ex. Gotchas (students and
    adults)
  • intermittent-unexpected
  • weekly/quarterly grade-level/whole school
    celebrations
  • Re-teach
  • restate the expectation using a different
    strategy
  • have the student practice the skill

17
School-Wide Behavioral Matrix
  • PURPOSES
  • Defines the Expected Behaviors for Specific
  • Non-Classroom Settings.
  • hallways, gym, cafeteria, commons,
  • bus loading, bathrooms, assemblies, playground
  • Creates the Curriculum that will guide the
    teaching of expected behaviors.
  • Enhances communication and creates common
    language among staff and between students and
    staff.

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What are tools/ behavior lesson plans?
  • Cool tools/ behavior lesson plans structure how
    staff teach the expected behaviors from the
    school-wide behavioral matrix.
  • A research-based procedure for teaching the
    behaviors.
  • Examples and non-examples taken from classroom
    and non-classroom settings and situations.
  • Modeling and role-playing to teach new skills and
    provide students with practice opportunities.
  • Feedback and acknowledgment to ensure students
    display the expected/taught behaviors.
  • Taught initially at kickoff, followed by weekly
    cool tools based on data with eventual
    integration into all curricula.

20
Purposes of Acknowledgments
  • Reinforce the teaching of new behaviors
  • Encourage the behaviors we want to occur
  • again in the future
  • Harness the influence of the students who are
    showing expected behaviors to encourage the
    students who are not
  • Strengthen positive behaviors that can compete
    with problem behavior
  • Prompt for adults to recognize expected behavior

21
Why should I reward students for something they
should be doing anyway?
How do rewards shape our behavior?
22
Establish procedures for discouraging
inappropriate behavior
  • Decide which behaviors are managed in the
    classroom and which behaviors are sent to the
    office
  • Support teachers in designing classroom
    management systems
  • Develop continuum of procedures for responding to
    ODRs
  • Re-teaching of expected behavior
  • Follow up with increased acknowledgment
  • Verbal reprimands
  • Community service
  • Follow up with increased acknowledgment
  • Detentions
  • Additional responses/options for students needing
    Tier 2 and/or Tier 3 interventions (The Triangle)

23
School Example
  • Teacher Managed Behavior
  • Attendance/Tardy Inform parents on effect on
    academic performance
  • Profanity directed at student
  • Gum chewing
  • Homework
  • No supplies
  • Tattling
  • Non-compliance
  • Name calling
  • Lying
  • Minor stealing
  • Cheating
  • Dress Code Violations
  • Minor Harassment
  • Office Managed Behavior
  • Attendance/Tardy
  • Vandalism
  • Substances
  • Defiance
  • Weapons
  • Profanity directed at Adults
  • Major disruptions
  • Fighting
  • Verbal/Physical intimidation
  • Major stealing
  • Cutting school
  • Wanderers
  • Gang Related Activity
  • Chronic Dress Code Violation
  • Harassment (including sexual)

24
Data collection and use
  • Why do we use data?
  • Data gives a picture of whats happening
    behaviorally in the school.
  • Sets baseline to measure improvement
  • Identifies need
  • Guides intervention planning
  • Measures effectiveness of interventions

25
Improving Decision-Making
From
Problem
Solution
To
Problem Solving Using Data
Solution Monitor Outcome
Problem

26
PBIS teams CONSISTENTLY review the following
(current to within 48 hours) data/graphs
  • The average number of referrals
  • Per day per month
  • By type of behavior
  • By location
  • By time of day
  • By student

27
What does this graph tell you (or not tell you)?
 
 
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Sustaining PBIS
  • Administrative commitment
  • Internal capacity building (80-100
  • of staff support
  • Communication participation of staff,
  • students, parents and community
  • Top 3 school improvement goals
  • Use self-assessment data

(OSEP, 2003)
34
Without Problem Solving
Special Education
Sea of Ineligibility
General Education
35
Bridging the Gap
General Intensive Resources
General Supplemental Resources
Amount of Resources Needed to Solve Problem
General Resources
Intensity of Problem
36
What does a PBIS school look like ?
  • Answer
  • Behavior is very different
  • Teachers can teach
  • Students can learn
  • Academics are better

37
www.pbis.orgwww.pbisillinois.orgwww.pbssurveys.o
rgwww.swis.orgwww.isbe.netwww.iirc.niu.eduwww.
is-tac.org
Resources
38
Pre
Post----------------------------------------------
-------------?
39
Foreman High School Office Discipline Referrals
by Month by Year
ODR per day per month per 100 students per
average daily enrollment
Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan
Feb March April May
June
Months
40
MARK TWAIN PRIMARY SCHOOLAYP 2003-2008 -
MEETS/EXCEEDS
41
Eisenhower Jr. High SchoolSchaumburg School
District 54
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