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How Schools Work and How to Work with Schools

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Guides to School Health Councils ... Work Group on Health Promotion and Community ... Health Is Academic : A Guide to Coordinated School Health Programs ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: How Schools Work and How to Work with Schools


1
How Schools Work and How to Work with Schools
Brenda Z. Greene National School Boards
Association Jim Bogden National Association of
State Boards of Education
2
Todays Presenters
Brenda Z. Greene Jim
Bogden National School Boards National
Association of Association (NSBA)
State Boards of
Education
(NASBE)
3
Web Conference Co-sponsor
Co-sponsored by the National Youth Violence
Prevention Resource Center (NYVPRC) www.safeyouth
.org
4
Objectives
  • Increase understanding of where policy and
    decisions are made in the education system
  • Identify whos who in education decision making
  • Identify strategies for engaging education
    leaders to improve school health-related policies
    and practices
  • Learn about valuable resources
  • Become personally empowered as policy advocates

5
How Schools Work and How to Work with Schools
  • How education works at the school, district,
    state, and national levels
  • Practical tips for how to work with educators,
    administrators, and policymakers
  • Updated and expanded 2003
  • Order at www.nasbe.org

6
YOUTH
7
A Complex Cast of Thousands
State board of education
Legislature
Governor
Chief state school officer
State level
State education agency staff
School board
Local government
School district level
Superintendent
Central office staff
School improvement council
School level
Principal
School staff
8
Highly Diffuse, Radically Decentralized Decision
Making
  • 50 distinct education systems
  • Tradition of local controllimited federal and
    state roles
  • Everyone is an expert
  • Individual superintendents and principals have
    broad authority
  • Change must often occur district by district and
    school by school

9
Major Differences Between the Education and
Health Systems
  • Multiple missions and goals
  • Traditionally, less reliance on good data
    collection, basic research, and programmatic
    research
  • challenges of measuring success
  • little investment in basic research
  • no efficient means of sharing best practices
  • much instructional content driven by the textbook
    publishing industry
  • faddish innovations

10
When Research is Lacking
  • Kids dont learn anything hanging from the
    monkey bars
  • Atlanta Schools Superintendent

11
The No Child Left Behind Act
  • Positive
  • focusing efforts on the achievement of all
    students
  • emphasis on data-driven decision making and
    research-based programs
  • Challenges
  • health and physical education not included
  • problematic testing and enforcement provisions
  • unrealistic expectations for student achievement
  • unfunded mandate
  • keeping policymakers very busy

12
More Challenges
  • Students enter with extremely different levels of
    readiness
  • Non-academic barriers to learning
  • School finance / funding
  • Sustaining support for public education
  • Aging population
  • Economic choices

13
Whos Who at the School Level
  • The principal is key
  • Entry points
  • School improvement team
  • School health council
  • Health and mental health services staff
  • Classroom teachers
  • Parent organizations
  • Student organizations

School improvement council
Principal
School staff
14
School Health Advisory Council
  • Tool for identifying priorities and strategies
  • Broad-based representation
  • School personnel
  • Community professionals
  • Parents
  • Students
  • Others?
  • School-level to advise principal
  • District-wide to advise school board

15
Guides to School Health Councils
  • Obtain through your local American Cancer
    Society chapter, call 1-800-ACS-2345, or
    http//schoolhealth.info

From North Carolina Public Schoolswww.nchealthys
chools.org
16
Community Tool Box
  • Developed by the Work Group on Health Promotion
    and Community Development at the University of
    Kansas
  • Over 6,000 pages of practical skill-building
    information on over 250 different topics

http//ctb.ukans.edu
17
A Modern, Coordinated School Health Program
18
School Health Index A Self-Assessment and
Planning Guide
  • Identify your own schools strengths and
    weaknesses
  • Prioritize issues
  • Develop an action plan
  • Involve teachers, students, parents, and
    community
  • Download free at www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth

19
Whos Who at the School District Level
  • In theory.
  • The school board makes policy
  • The superintendent implements it

Local government
School board
Superintendent
Central office staff
20
How to Work with School District Leaders
  • Formal approaches
  • Service on board and administration advisory
    committees
  • Testimony at meetings and public hearings
  • Written communications
  • Informal approaches
  • Direct contact with board members and
    administrators
  • Enlist influential key communicators
  • Make presentations at meetings and conferences
    attended by policymakers

21
The Key Work of School Boards
  • What boards do Student achievement
  • How boards do it Community engagement
  • www.nsba.org

22
Whos Who at the State Level
  • Become knowledgeable about who has what authority
    and how they interact

23
Preparing a Policy Initiative
  • Monitor agendas, discussions, board processes,
    and board members interests
  • Identify policy gaps
  • Compose rationale for adopting policy
  • Develop key messages and simple strategies
  • Compile accurate data from credible sources
  • Anticipate and prepare for potential conflicts

24
Persuading Education Leaders
  • Note serious problems/needs, but emphasize
    solutions
  • Link to existing policies, programs, and goals
  • Use current terminology (education reform,
    ready to learn, academic achievement)
  • Highlight school health as an emerging trend
  • Identify policy options
  • Be honest about costs and potential
    implementation problems

25
Presenting Information
  • Make a brief oral presentation of only the most
    important points
  • Submit a succinct written rationale
  • Present disparate research findings from credible
    organizations in a neutral, balanced manner
  • Use clear language (avoid academic, health, and
    social services jargon)
  • Unadorned charts and graphs illustrate key
    findings

26
Moving the Issue Forward
  • Brief sympathetic policymakers on answers to
    difficult questions that might arise in public
    meetings
  • Enlist respected community members to express
    support
  • Enlist business community endorsement
  • Help students research issues, prepare
    presentations, and be included on public-hearing
    agendas
  • Suggest a pilot study if a policy or program does
    not gain support

27
Persistence Pays
  • Respect the hierarchy
  • Stay focused on the ultimate goal
  • Dont expect quick or easy success
  • Sustain the effort
  • Be willing to compromisebut know your bottom
    line
  • Dont burn your bridges
  • Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful,
    committed citizens can change the world indeed
    it is the only thing that ever has. -
    Margaret Meade

28
A Modern, Coordinated School Health Program
29
Health Is Academic
Health Is Academic A Guide to Coordinated
School Health Programs Eva Marx, Susan Wooley,
Daphne Northrup, eds., 1998, Teachers College
Press
www2.edc.org/HealthIsAcademic
30
CDCs Guidelines for School Health Programs
www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth
31
www.nsba.org/SchoolHealth
32
Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn
  • Guide to policymaking
  • Sample policies - download at www.nasbe.org/healt
    hyschools/fithealthy.mgi
  • Full explanations
  • Research findings
  • Notable quotes
  • Excerpts of actual policies
  • Resource lists

33
www.nasbe.org/HealthySchools
34
Healthy Youth Funding Database
http//apps.nccd.cdc.gov/SHPFP/
35
Useful ResourcesSchool Health Starter Kit
From The Council of Chief State School Officers
(CCSSO) and The Association of State and
Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) www.ccsso.org
/ starterkit.html
36
Making the Connection Health and Student
Achievement
  • Association of State and Territorial Health
    Officials www.astho.org
  • Society of State Directors of Physical Education
    and Health www.thesociety.org

37
  • Brenda Z. Greene
  • Director, School Health Programs
  • National School Boards Association
  • Internet www.nsba.org/schoolhealth
  • E-mail schoolhealth_at_nsba.org
  • 703-838-6722 (main -- ask for School Health
    Programs staff)
  • Fax School Health Programs--703-548-5516

38
  • James F. Bogden
  • Safe and Healthy Schools Project Director
  • National Association of State Boards of Education
  • Internet www.nasbe.org/HealthySchools
  • E-mail jimb_at_nasbe.org
  • 703-684-4000 x108

39
Full Speed Ahead!
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