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Hotel

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Discussed Major Topics of Chapter 1 'Providing Safe Food' and Chapter 2 ' The Microworld' ... jimsonweed, root of water hemlock, snakeroot, honey produced ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Hotel


1
Hotel Restaurant Sanitation and Safety
  • HRT 225
  • Spring 2000 Quarter
  • April 3, 2000
  • Don St. Hilaire

2
Todays Class
  • Previous Class Highlights
  • Review Organization of Textbook
  • Discuss Major Topics of Chapters 3 and 4
  • Summary

3
Previous Class Highlights
  • Briefly Reviewed Syllabus
  • ServSafe Introduction
  • Discussed Major Topics of Chapter 1 Providing
    Safe Food and Chapter 2 The Microworld

4
ServSafe Coursebook-Overview
  • Unit I - The Sanitation Challenge
  • Unit II - The Flow of Food Through the Operation
  • Unit III - Clean and Sanitary Facilities and
    Equipment
  • Unit IV - Sanitation Management

5
Unit I - The Sanitation Challenge
  • Chapter 1 - Providing Safe Food - completed
  • Chapter 2 - The Microworld - completed
  • Chapter 3 - Contamination, Food Allergies, and
    Foodborne Illness
  • Chapter 4 - The Safe Foodhandler

6
Ch.3 - Contamination, Food Allergies, FBI -
Major Topics
  • Types of Foodborne Contamination
  • Biological Contamination
  • Seafood Toxins
  • Plant and Fungal Toxins
  • Chemical Contamination
  • Toxic Metals
  • Chemicals and Pesticides
  • Physical Contamination
  • Food Allergies

7
Ch.3 - Types of Foodborne Contamination
  • Biological Contamination
  • Chemical Contamination
  • Physical Hazards

8
Ch. 3 - Biological Contamination
  • Foodborne intocxication occurs when a person eats
    a food containing a biological toxin
  • Most of these biological toxins occur naturally
    and are not caused by the presence of
    microorganisms
  • Some occur in fish as a result of their diet

9
Ch. 3 - Seafood Toxins
  • Ciguatera toxin occurs in certain predatory
    tropical reef fish such as amberjack, barracuda,
    grouper, and snapper
  • These fish eat smaller fish which have eaten
    certain species of algae
  • Cooking does not destroy the ciguatera toxin
  • Shellfish may also contain toxins - Paralytic
    shellfish poisoning (PSP) is the most serious type

10
Ch. 3 - Seafood Toxins cont.
  • Cooking does not destroy shellfish toxins
  • Scombroid poisoning occurs as a result of
    time-temperature abuse for the scombroid species
    of fish, such as tuna, mackerel, bluefish,
    skipjack, swordfish, and bonito
  • Bacteria associated with the fish produce the
    toxin histamine

11
Ch. 3 - Seafood Toxins cont.
  • Scombroid poisoning is also known as histamine
    posioning
  • May occur in other fish species such as
    mahi-mahi, marlin, and sardines
  • The histamine toxin is not destroyed by cooking
    or freezing.

12
Ch. 3 Seafood Toxins cont.
  • Systemic fish toxins occur as a natural part of
    the fish pufferfish. Tetrodotoxin is contained
    in its liver, skin, and other organs
  • Consumption of this toxin can produce rapid and
    violent death
  • Cooking may not destroy this toxin

13
Ch. 3 Seafood Toxins - General Practices
  • Purchase fish from reputable suppliers who
    maintain strict time-temperature controls
  • Refuse fish that have been thawed and refrozen
  • Check temperature- must be 41 degrees F. or lower
    when delivered. Note this practice will not
    prevent scombroid intoxication
  • Toxins are not living organisms, so cooking or
    freezing will not destroy them

14
Ch. 3 - Plant and Fungal Toxins
  • Most poisoning caused by plants result when toxic
    plants have been used in medicinal home remedies
  • Rhubarb leaves, jimsonweed, root of water
    hemlock, snakeroot, honey produced by bees that
    gathered nectar from mountain laurel or
    rhododendrons
  • Only commercially processed honey and properly
    cooked beans should be used

15
Ch. 3 - Plant and Fungal Toxins cont.
  • Some plants may be toxic in their raw state, but
    safe when properly cooked - examples are fava
    beans and red kidney beans
  • Mushroom toxins- most cases of foodborne illness
    occur when toxic mushroom species are confused
    with edible mushroom species
  • Cooking or freezing will not destroy the mushroom
    toxins - do not use wild mushrooms

16
Ch. 3 - Plant and Fungal Toxins cont.
  • All mushrooms should be purchased from approved
    suppliers
  • See Exhibit 3d on page 3-6 for a summary of
    common biological toxins

17
Ch. 3 - Chemical Contamination
  • Chemical contaminants include toxic metals,
    pesticides, and chemicals
  • Toxic metals include lead, copper, brass, zinc,
    antimony, and cadmium
  • Acidic foods are stored in or prepared with this
    type of equipment, they can leach these metals
    from the equipment and contaminate the food item

18
Ch. 3 - Chemical Contamination cont.
  • Toxic Metals Example - storing tomato sauce in a
    copper pot or lemonade in a pewter pitcher or a
    galvanized (zinc-coated) tub could lead to
    foodborne illness from chemical contamination
  • Use only food-grade utensils and equipment to
    prepare and store food

19
Ch. 3 - Chemical Contamination cont.
  • Beverage dispensing systems should be installed
    and maintained only by professionals
  • Carbonated water can flow back into the copper
    supply lines, leach the copper, and contaminate
    the beverage
  • Chemicals such as cleaning products, polishes,
    lubricants, and sanitizers can contaminate food
    if improperly used or stored - Follow directions

20
Ch. 3 - Chemical Contamination cont.
  • Follow the directions supplied by the
    manufacturer
  • Store chemicals in a locked container away from
    food packaging, utensils, and equipment used for
    food
  • Use original containers (preferred) or clearly
    and properly labeled containers
  • Pesticides should only be applied by a trained
    Pest Control Operator (PCO)

21
Ch. 3 - Chemical Contamination cont.
  • See Exhibit 3f on page 3-8 for a summary

22
Ch. 3 - Physical Contamination
  • Results from the introduction of foreign objects
    into foods
  • Common examples are glass, staples from cartons,
    metal shavings from cans, hair, dirt
  • Contaminant could be a natural part of the food,
    bones in chicken or fish
  • Close inspection during receiving, storing,
    preparation, and reuse is required

23
Ch. 3 - Food Allergies
  • A food allergy is the bodys negative reaction to
    a particular food or foods
  • Most common food allergens include
  • Milk and dairy products
  • Egg and egg products
  • fish, shellfish, wheat
  • soy and soy products
  • peanuts and other nuts

24
Ch. 3 - Food Allergies cont.
  • Some people are allergic to Common Food additives
    and Preservatives
  • Sulfites - used to preserve freshness and/or
    color of certain foods
  • Nitrites - preservatives used by the meat
    industry
  • MSG (Monosodium Glutamate) - used to enhance
    flavor in packaged foods and it is on the federal
    governments GRAS (Generally Regarded as Safe)
    list

25
Ch. 3 - Food Allergies cont.
  • Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, hives, loss of
    consciousness, headaches - dependent upon the
    allergen and the individual
  • Train employees on how to inform customers of
    menu items that contain potential allergens
  • Designate one person per shift to answer
    customers questions regarding menu items

26
Ch. 3 - Food Allergies cont.
  • Sauces and garnishes are often the source of
    allergic reactions - serve on the side
  • Make sure all cookware, utensils, and tableware
    are allergen free to prevent cross contamination

27
Ch. 4 The Safe Foodhandler- Major Topics
  • How Foodhandlers Can Contaminate Food
  • Diseases Not Transmitted Through Food
  • Components of a Good Personal Hygiene Program
  • Hygienic Hand Practices
  • General Personal Cleanliness

28
Ch. 4 The Safe Foodhandler - Major Topics Cont.
  • Proper Work Attire
  • Eating, Smoking, and Drinking Policies
  • Policies for Reporting Illness and Injury
  • Managements Role in a Personal Hygiene Program

29
Ch. 4 How Foodhandlers Can Contaminate Food
  • When they have diagnosed with a FBI
  • Show symptoms of gastrointestinal illness
  • When they have Infected lesions
  • Live with or exposed to a person who is ill
  • Touch anything that may contaminate their hands
  • May be a carrier- Hepatitis A, Salmonella

30
Ch. 4 Diseases Not Transmitted Through Food
  • AIDS
  • Hepatitis B

31
Ch. 4 Components of a Good Personal Hygiene
Program
  • Hygienic hand practices
  • Maintaining personal cleanliness
  • Wearing clean and appropriate uniforms and
    following dress codes
  • Avoiding unsanitary habits and actions
  • Maintaining good health
  • Reporting illnesses

32
Ch. 4 Hygienic Hand Practices
  • Describes and demonstrate the 6 steps of proper
    handwashing
  • See p. 4-4 to 4-5 Wet, Soap, Rub 20 seconds,
    Clean nails and between fingers, Rinse, Dry with
    single-use towel
  • Hand sanitizers do not replace handwashing, wait
    until sanitizer dries before touching food

33
Ch. 4 Hygienic Hand Practices Cont.
  • When foodhandlers must wash their hands?
  • After using the restroom, touching raw food,
    touching hair, face, or body, clothing or apron,
    anything that may contaminate hands
  • After sneezing, coughing, or using handkerchief
    or tissue
  • After using cleaning, polishing, or sanitizing
    chemicals
  • After taking out the garbage or trash
  • After smoking, eating, drinking, chewing gum

34
Ch. 4 Hygienic Hand Practices Cont.
  • What is Proper Hand care?
  • Fingernails should be short, clean, unpolished
  • How to handle cuts?
  • Use clean bandages, gloves and finger cots
  • What is the purpose of gloves and when should you
    change them?
  • When soiled or torn, before beginning a new task,
    At least every 4 hours during continual use
    After handling raw meat

35
Ch. 4 General Personal Cleanliness
  • Bathe or shower before work
  • Clean hair

36
Ch. 4 Proper Work Attire
  • Wear a clean hat or other hair restraint
  • Wear clean clothing
  • Remove aprons when leaving food-prep areas
  • Wear appropriate shoes
  • Remove jewelry

37
Ch. 4 Eating, Smoking, and Drinking Policies
  • Foodhandlers should eat, drink, chew gum, or use
    tobacco products only in designated areas
  • Foodhandlers should never spit in the
    establishment
  • See proper tasting process on page 4-10

38
Ch. 4 Policies for Reporting Illness and Injury
  • Managers must not allow foodhandlers to work if
    they have been diagnosed with a FBI
  • Foodhandlers must not work with or around food if
    they have symptoms which include fever, diarrhea,
    vomiting, a sore throat, or jaundice
  • Vaccination and effective handwashing can help
    prevent an outbreak of HepatitisA

39
Ch. 4 Managements Role in a Personal Hygiene
Program
  • Model proper behavior at all times
  • Establish proper personal hygiene policies
  • Train foodhandlers on personal hygiene policies
  • Continuously supervise sanitary practices and
    retrain as necessary
  • Job tasks and assignments should be planned to
    prevent the risk of cross-contamination

40
Summary
  • Reviewed highlights of previous class
  • Discussed Major Topics of Chapter 3
    Contamination, Food Allergies, and Foodborne
    Illness and Chapter 4 The Safe Foodhandler

41
Assignment
  • Review syllabus information and visit the web
    site for this class.
  • Read Chapters 5 and 6 of the ServSafe Coursebook.
  • Complete Homework Assignments 3
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