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Finding the Data You Need September 19, 2008 Eva DeLuna Castro, Senior Budget Analyst Frances Devine

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Title: Finding the Data You Need September 19, 2008 Eva DeLuna Castro, Senior Budget Analyst Frances Devine


1
Finding the Data You Need!September 19, 2008
Eva DeLuna Castro, Senior Budget Analyst
Frances Deviney, Ph.D., Texas KIDS COUNT Director
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Justification for the exclamation!
  • Well show you
  • Data available through www.cppp.org
  • Texas KIDS COUNT
  • CLIKS
  • Research Materials
  • Data from government websites
  • Data from nonprofit websites

3
Why Do You Want Data?
  • To describe a problem
  • To answer a question
  • To help set priorities
  • To monitor changes

4
When Might You Use it?
  • Grant reports
  • Papers/ Issue briefs
  • Presentations to your board
  • Presentations to community
  • Press releases/ Interviews

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KIDS COUNT
  • State county-level data from Texas KIDS COUNT
  • National KIDS COUNT
  • Current state and city-level data
  • 2000 Census data
  • State federal legislative districts
  • Native American Reservations
  • MSAs

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Texas KIDS COUNTThe State of Texas Children
  • Current State and County Data Profiles
  • www.cppp.org/kidscount

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  • To download The State of Texas Children 2007,
    please visit www.cppp.org/factbook07
  • To view CPPPs library of work, please visit
    www.cppp.org

Texas KIDS COUNT at the Center for Public Policy
Priorities
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Community-Level Information on Kids (CLIKS)
  • All Texas KIDS COUNT Data from 1989-Present

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Census Data by Legislative District
  • Data for your State Senate or House District from
    the 2000 Census

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State-Level Data
  • Examine data over time and across states

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State by state comparisons ONLY!!
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The Mother of All Data Sites Census Bureau
  • American Community Survey, www.census.gov/acs
  • Annual demographic, income, poverty, educational
    attainment housing data for areas with at least
    65,000 people
  • American FactFinder data tool (http//factfinder.c
    ensus.gov)

Three-year estimates are scheduled to be out in
December for areas between 20K 65K
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ACS Geographic Comparisons
Depending upon geographic comparison you choose,
can see tables on poverty, child poverty, median
income, median earnings
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If you have trouble downloading the data, hold
control while you select the Download option
AND while you select OK in the next window.
May have to do this twice if have popup blockers!
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The Mother of All Data Sites Census Bureau
  • Current Population Survey, www.census.gov/cps
  • Annual data for U.S. and states only on
  • income poverty
  • health insurance coverage and source
  • By race/ethnicity, marital status, nativity,
    gender
  • Table creator www.census.gov/hhes/www/cpstc/cps_t
    able_creator.html
  • Note about poverty data

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Other Useful Websites State Child Data
  • Texans Care for Children, www.texanscareforchildre
    n.org
  • The Childrens Campaign provides state-level data
    with assessments of over-time progress in areas
    of
  • Poverty
  • Health
  • Mental Health,
  • Early Care Education
  • Child Welfare
  • Youth Juvenile Violence

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Other Useful Websites Regional Child Data
  • Children at Risk, www.childrenatrisk.org
  • Local data on childrens issues (Growing Up in
    Houston)
  • J. McDonald Williams Institute,
    www.thewilliamsinstitute.org
  • Data at your fingertips Dallas Indicators,
    Analyze Dallas
  • Childrens Medical Center, www.childrens.com
  • Beyond ABC

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Other Useful Websites Health Data
  • Texas Department of State Health Services
  • http//soupfin.tdh.state.tx.us/
  • Birth Defects (state, Public Health Region,
    county, border)
  • Birth Death (state county)
  • Trauma Data (county trauma service area)

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Other Useful Websites Regional Health Data
  • Central Texas Health Data Collaborative
  • www.centexhealthdata.org
  • Data, studies, reports as compiled by community

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Other Useful Websites Health Population Data
  • Texas State Data Center Office of State
    Demographer www.txsdc.utsa.edu
  • Population estimates (2006)
  • by year of age race/ethnicity (state, county,
    MSA, Council of Governments COG region,
    place)
  • Population Projections (through 2040)
  • Different scenarios based upon migration patterns
    by race/ethnicity (state, county, MSA, COG)
  • Uninsured rates (2005)
  • by race and age group (state, county, Texas
    Health Regions, MSA)

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Other Useful Websites Workforce
  • Texas Workforce Commission
  • www.tracer2.com/cgi/dataanalysis
  • Unemployment
  • Wages
  • Projections by Occupation and Industry
  • Consumer Price Index
  • Income
  • Staffing Patterns

U.S., Texas, county, city, WDA, MSA, metro
division, balance of state
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What You Should Know to Use the Data
  • Percentages
  • Rates (Numerators, Denominators)
  • Problems with Small Numbers
  • Considerations when Making Comparisons

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Things to Remember When Looking at Percentages
Rates
  • Percentages are calculated as follows
  • Babies at Low Birthweight (LBW) Live Births
    of population
  • Sometimes, useful to represent these numbers as
    rates
  • 35 babies born at LBW 5892 live births .9
  • As a rate per 1,000 births, .9 9 LBW births
    per 1,000 live births
  • Caution Looking at rates alone can sometimes
    mask key information needed to fully understand
    the problem

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Things to Remember When Looking at Rates
  • Hypothetical Scenario
  • Interested in developing a bill to promote
    outreach education to reduce the incidence of
    low birthweight babies in your region
  • 2 different approaches to the problem
  • Focus on the counties with the greatest need,
    regardless of differences between sub-populations
  • Focus on the sub-populations most in need across
    counties

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Low Birthweight Example
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Low Birthweight Example (cont.)
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  • Considerations when Looking at Rates

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Whats Up With Chambers County?
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Juvenile Violent Crime (Numbers)
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Things to Remember When Looking at
Rates
  • Rates can change dramatically for smaller
    counties or smaller categories with a small shift
    in raw number
  • Depending upon your interest, you may be better
    served by examining
  • the change in raw over time
  • how current data compare to the state, nearby
    counties, or similar counties based on
    demographics geography

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Things to Remember When Looking at
Rankings
  • Rankings are based on the rates
  • Thus, they are subject to the same considerations
    as described above
  • Ranking can change dramatically for smaller
    counties or smaller categories with a minimal
    shift in raw number

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Things to Remember When Looking at
Rankings
  • In a state with 254 counties and varying
    demographics geographies, what does it mean to
    be ranked 127th on an indicator?
  • Depending upon your interest, you may be better
    served to look at
  • the change in raw over time
  • how current data compare to the state, nearby
    counties, or similar counties based on
    demographics geography

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Things to Remember When Looking at
Rankings
  • A very good ranking overconfidence/ no work
    left to be done
  • A very poor ranking insurmountable/ funds
    better spent elsewhere

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A Few Advocacy Examples
  • Expanding early education in San Antonio
  • Child nutrition in Cameron County
  • Additional (county-funded) resources to
    investigate child abuse

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San Antonio example
  • Get Bexar County Data on early education (in 2007
    State Data book)
  • Possibilities (1) get pre-K participation up to
    state average (2) set a goal to expand child
    care (to twice the state average).
  • Option number 2 goal of having 11 of children
    in state-subsidized child care. In total
    numbers, this means another 16,669 children
    served, according to Kids Count. Multiply by
    average TWC daily cost of child care (16 to 21
    in 2011), and the ballpark cost is 67 million to
    88 million.

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Cameron County example
  • Cameron County nutrition data (in 2007 book) In
    2005, 59,387 children got Food Stamps, or 48 of
    the countys children. But according to American
    Community Survey, 55 of the countys children
    are below 125 of poverty (close to income cap
    for Food Stamps).
  • Policy goal full participation another 8,600
    children in Cameron County get Food Stamps. Good
    news benefits are 100 federally funded! Quick
    look at Texas HHSC website shows average monthly
    benefit is 90 per recipient in September 2008.
    Full child participation would generate 9.3
    million in added federal benefits.
  • Back to Kids Count Cameron County Page Clicking
    on children receiving Food Stamps produces a
    pop-up on CPPP research in food/nutrition. One
    recent report says, USDA estimates that every 5
    in Food Stamp benefits generates 9.20 in local
    economic activity. So, total economic boost
    17 million.

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County CPS example
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  • Contact Information
  • Eva DeLuna Castro
  • Senior Budget Analyst
  • deluna.castro_at_cppp.org
  • (512) 320-0222 ext. 103
  • Frances Deviney, PhD
  • Texas KIDS COUNT Director
  • deviney_at_cppp.org
  • (512) 320-0222 ext. 106

Texas KIDS COUNT at the Center for Public Policy
Priorities
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Use of This Presentation
  • The Center for Public Policy Priorities
    encourages you to reproduce and distribute these
    slides. If you reproduce these slides, please
    give appropriate credit to CPPP.
  • The data presented here may become outdated.
  • For the most recent information or to sign up for
  • our free E-Mail Updates, visit www.cppp.org.
  • Center for Public Policy Priorities
  • 900 Lydia Street
  • Austin, TX 78702
  • P 512/320-0222 F 512/320-0227
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