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An Introductory Course in an Undergraduate E-commerce Technology Degree Program

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Graduate programs: CS, CGA, DS, ECT, HCI, IS, SE, TDC. 4. E-commerce technology ... Introductory courses. Breadth-first approach. General survey of important topics ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: An Introductory Course in an Undergraduate E-commerce Technology Degree Program


1
An Introductory Course in an UndergraduateE-comme
rce Technology Degree Program
  • Amber Settle
  • Assistant Professor
  • CTI, DePaul University
  • ISECON
  • November 2, 2001

2
Outline
  • School of CTI at DePaul University
  • Undergraduate e-commerce technology program
  • ECT 250 Survey of e-commerce technology course
  • Web development sequence
  • A balanced approach
  • Course overview
  • Future in the undergraduate CTI programs

3
DePaul CTI
  • School of Computer Science, Telecommunications,
  • and Information Systems
  • Faculty size (Fall 2001)
  • 80 full-time faculty
  • 100 part-time faculty
  • Enrollments (Spring 2001)
  • Undergraduate 1575
  • Graduate (M.S.) 2096
  • Ph.D. 40
  • Undergraduate programs CS, CGA, ECT,
  • HCI, IS , NT
  • Graduate programs CS, CGA, DS, ECT,
  • HCI, IS, SE, TDC.

4
E-commerce technology
  • M.S. in E-commerce technology
  • Introduced in September 1999
  • See related papers Knight 2001
  • Generated undergraduate interest
  • B.S. in E-commerce technology
  • Introduced in September 2000
  • Focus areas include Programming, user-
  • centered interface design, system design,
  • technology of databases, networking, and
  • middleware.
  • Enrollment (September 2001) 65

5
Web development
  • Web development courses in the B.S. in ECT
  • ECT 250 Survey of e-commerce technology
  • ECT 270 Client-side Web application development
  • HTML
  • Cascading Style Sheets
  • DHTML using JavaScript
  • ECT 353 Server-side Web application development
  • Development of small-scale e-commerce transaction
  • applications. Current technologies ASP,
    VBScript.

6
Introductory courses
  • Breadth-first approach
  • General survey of important topics
  • See related papers
  • Bagert, Marcy, and Calloni, 1995
  • King and Barr, 1997
  • McFall and Stegink, 1997
  • Depth-first approach
  • A particular technology in detail
  • See related papers
  • Mercuri, Herrmann, and Popyack, 1998
  • Hermann and Popyack, 1994
  • Kolesar and Allan, 1995

7
A balanced approach
  • Combine breadth and depth topics
  • Provides a broad framework and sufficient
  • experience to understand the significance of
  • an area
  • Finding the balance can be challenging
  • Example Reed 2001
  • The key for ECT 250 Survey of e-commerce
    technology
  • Using a Web development tool

8
The breadth topics
  • The Internet and WWW
  • E-commerce hardware and software
  • Security
  • Electronic payment systems
  • Marketing, sales, and promotion
  • Purchasing, logistics, and support activities
  • International, ethical, and legal issues
  • Key themes Importance of standards, rapidly
  • changing nature of the field, relative importance
  • of B2B vs. B2C

9
The depth topics
  • FrontPage
  • Graphic formats
  • Publishing Web pages
  • FTP
  • Telnet
  • Unix commands
  • Markup languages
  • Issues surrounding frames
  • Web page design
  • Focus Preparation for subsequent Web development
  • courses

10
The course
  • Textbook Electronic Commerce, Schneider Perry
  • Ten weeks, two lectures of 1 ½ hours per week
  • Lecture topics
  • Breadth 11 lectures
  • Depth 7 lectures
  • Midterm and final exam
  • Students from CTI, Commerce, and Liberal Arts
  • All undergraduate class levels

11
Assignments and exams
  • Weekly assignments 8
  • Orientation via an e-mailed survey
  • Web page creation and publication
  • Home page, shrine page, subject page
  • Survey topics
  • E-commerce and networking basics, Web
  • hosting options, computer forensics, basic
  • encryption
  • Comprehensive exams 2
  • True/false, matching, short answer, essay

12
Future
  • New textbook
  • E-commerce Business, Technology, Society.
  • Laudon Traver
  • Inclusion into new programs
  • Undergraduate ECT, IS, NT (Fall 2001)
  • Increase in enrollment
  • Fall 2000 Two sections
  • Fall 2001 Five sections
  • Winter 2002 Six sections
  • A redesign of CSC 200 Survey of computer
  • technology

13
References
  • Bagert, Donald, William Marcy, and Ben Calloni,
    1995, A Successful
  • Five-year Experiment with a Breadth-first
    Introductory Course.
  • SIGCSE Bulletin 27(1) 116-120.
  • Herrmann, Nira, and Jeffrey Popyack, 1994, An
    Integrated, Software-
  • based Approach to Teaching Introductory Computer
    Programming.
  • SIGCSE Bulletin 27(1) 92-96. spreadsheets
  • King, L.A. Smith, and John Barr, 1997, Computer
    Science for the Artist.
  • SIGCSE Bulletin 29(1) 150-153. graphics
  • Kolesar, Mary, and Vicki Allan, 1995, Teaching
    Computer Science
  • Concepts and Problem Solving with a Spreadsheet.
    SIGCSE Bulletin
  • 27(1) 10-13.
  • McFall, Ryan, and Gordon Stegink, 1997,
    Introductory Computer Science
  • for General Education Laboratories, Textbooks,
    and the Internet.
  • SIGCSE Bulletin 29(1) 96-100.
  • Mercuri, Rebecca, Nira Herrmann, and Jeffrey
    Popyack, 1998, Using
  • HTML and JavaScript in Introductory Programming
    Courses.
  • SIGCSE Bulletin 30(1) 176-180.
  • Reed, David, 2001, Rethinking CS0 with
    Javascript. SIGCSE Bulletin
  • 33(1) 100-104.
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