2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 2650c2-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Description:

2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:38
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 111
Provided by: hcma
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans


1
2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans
  • State Department of Education
  • Child Nutrition Department

2
Why Do You Need To Know The DGAs and Basic
Nutrition?
  • You have a huge impact on the health of your
    students
  • The USDA promises to update NSLP and NSBP
    requirements within the next year
  • Most Importantly
  • FOR YOUR OWN HEALTH

3
History of USDAs Food Guidance
Food for Young Children
1992
1916
1940s
1970s
2005
1950s-1960s
4
Adequate Nutrients Within Calorie Needs
5
  • Consume a variety of nutrient dense foods and
    beverages
  • Follow the USDA Pyramid
  • Limit intake of saturated and trans fat,
    cholesterol, added sugars, salt, and alcohol
  • Eat more dark green vegetables, orange
    vegetables, legumes, fruits, whole grains, and
    low-fat milk products

6
Nutrients of Concern
  • Adults calcium, potassium, fiber, magnesium,
    and vitamins A, C, and E
  • Children and adolescents calcium, potassium,
    fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E

7
Weight Management
8
Maintain A Healthy Body Weight
  • Eat a balanced varied diet that incorporates all
    major food groups
  • Control portion sizes to help limit extra
    calories
  • Be more physically active in everyday life
  • Most effective change reduce intake of added
    sugars, fats, and alcohol

9
Prevent Gradual Weight Gain
  • Most adults gain weight overtime, so make small
    decreases in caloric intake to avoid this gain
  • Eat foods low in calories such as fruit or
    vegetables

10
Balance Energy In w/ Energy Out
  • Successful and sustainable weight
    loss/maintenance requires attention to both sides
    of the energy balance
  • FOOD/BEVERAGES (energy in)
  • EXERCISE/ACTIVTY (energy out)
  • If eat more calories than your body uses it will
    be stored as fat
  • 1 lb of body fat 3,500 calories
  • Example eating 500 calories fewer a day will
    result in a loss of 1 pound a week

11
Discretionary Calories
  • Each person has a total calorie budget.  This
  • budget can be divided into essentials and
    extras.
  • Depending on the foods you choose, you may be
  • able to spend more calories than the amount
  • required to meet your nutrient needs.
  • Most discretionary calorie allowances are very
  • small, between 100 and 300 calories, especially
  • for those who are not physically active.

12
Determine Calorie Needs Estimated Energy
Requirements for males
From the National Academy of Sciences, Institute
of Medicine Dietary Reference Intakes
Macronutrient Report
13
Discretionary Calories May be used to
  • Increase amount of food selected from a food
    group
  • Consume foods that are not in the lowest fat
    formsuch as 2 milk or medium-fat meat or items
    that contain added sugars
  • Add oil, fat, or sugar to foods
  • Consume alcohol, soda, wine or beer

14
Simple Ways to Burn 100 Calories
15
Serving Sizes One of the most important aspects
of any diet
Occasionally, measure the foods you eat using
measuring cups and measuring spoons to help
remind yourself what a correct serving size looks
like.
16

Portion Sizes 1 cup
1 cup 1 baseball
17
Portion Sizes 1 teaspoon 1 tablespoon
  • 1 teaspoon the tip of a thumb to the first
    joint

1 golf ball 2 Tablespoons peanut butter, oil,
dressing

18
Portion Sizes Cheese
4
2
6
5
3
1
  • 1 1/2 ounces of natural cheese,
  • equivalent to 1 cup milk 6 dice

(Note 2 ounces of processed cheese, equivalent
to 1 cup milk 8 dice)
19
Portion Sizes Meats
  • 3 oz. cooked meat, fish or poultry a deck of
    cards


20
Serving Sizes Snacks 1 oz snack food 1 handful

21
Serving Size Activity
  • Now its time to test your skills on the
    information you just learned about correct
    serving sizes.

22
Physical Activity
23
How Much Physical Activity?
  • Engage in daily moderate intensity activity
  • Daily Recommendations
  • 30 minutes-reduces risk of chronic disease
  • 60 minutes-helps manage body weight and prevent
    weight gain
  • 60 to 90 minutes-sustain weight loss
  • Activity can be split into several small segments
  • Physical activity will not only help your
    physical health, but also your mental health

24
There Are Several Activities To Enjoy
  • Moderate Activity
  • Walking
  • Gardening
  • Dancing
  • Vacuuming
  • Raking Leaves
  • Bowling
  • Vigorous Activity
  • Bicycling
  • Jogging/running
  • Swimming
  • Aerobics
  • Sports (basketball, soccer, volleyball, etc)

Greater health benefits can be obtained by
engaging in physical activity of more vigorous
intensity or longer duration
25
Physical Activity Tips
  • Include cardiovascular conditioning, stretching
    exercises for flexibility, and resistance
    exercises or calisthenics for muscle strength
  • Start slow and work your way up to goal time or
    level
  • Find small changes you can make in your life to
    add activity (return shopping carts to store,
    walk 10 min. w/ a friend during breaks, take the
    stairs, etc)

26
Fun Ways to Track Your Activity
  • www.americaonthemove.org
  • Sign up individually or as a group
  • Activity calendar (blue handout)

27
Physical Activity Break
28
Food Groups To Encourage
29
Food Guidelines Focus On
  • Fruits and Vegetables
  • Whole Grains
  • Milk and Milk Products

30
Fruits and Vegetables
  • Fruit 2 cups daily
  • Fresh, frozen, canned, or dried is better than
    juice because more fiber in whole fruit
  • Vegetables 2 ½ cups daily
  • Need to eat from each vegetable group weekly
  • Dark green
  • Orange
  • Legumes
  • Starchy Vegetables
  • Other Vegetables

31
Orange Vegetables
  • Acorn squash
  • Butternut squash
  • Carrots
  • Hubbard squash
  • Pumpkin
  • Sweetpotatoes

32
Dark Green Vegetables
  • Bok choy
  • Broccoli
  • Collard greens
  • Dark green leafy lettuce
  • Kale
  • Mustard greens
  • Romaine lettuce
  • Spinach
  • Turnip greens
  • Watercress

33
Legumes
  • Black beans
  • Black-eyed peas
  • Garbanzo beans (chickpeas)
  • Kidney beans
  • Lentils
  • Lima beans (mature)
  • Navy beans
  • Pinto beans
  • Soy beans
  • Split peas
  • Tofu (bean curd made from soybeans)
  • White beans

34
Starchy Vegetables
  • Corn
  • Green peas
  • Lima beans (green)
  • Potatoes

35
Other Vegetables
  • Artichokes
  • Asparagus
  • Beets
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Cucumbers
  • Eggplant
  • Green beans
  • Green or red peppers
  • Iceberg (head) lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Okra
  • Onions
  • Tomatoes
  • Vegetable juice
  • Turnips

36
Whole Grains
  • Linked to a lot of positive health benefit
  • Fiber helps with a healthy digestive system
  • Help reduce risk of chronic disease like heart
    disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, and obesity

37
Whole Grains
  • Recommendations 3 servings of whole grains/day
  • Serving
  • 1 slice of bread
  • ½ English Muffin
  • ½ Hamburger Bun
  • 1 cup dry cereal
  • ½ cup cooked cereal, rice, pasta
  • 9 out of 10 Americans do not meet this requirement

38
What Is A Whole Grain
  • Color does not determine if a product is whole
    grain!
  • Whole grain all components of the grain is used
  • Endosperm (white, starchy, large part of the
    grain)
  • Provides carbohydrates, proteins, and some
    vitamins and minerals
  • Bran (the husk, protective outer shell)
  • Provides fiber, antioxidants, and B vitamins
  • Germ (nutrient packed seedling)
  • Provides B vitamins, minerals, some protein, and
    healthful fats
  • A whole grain must include all 3 parts
  • Refined flours contain only endosperm

39
(No Transcript)
40
What Is A Whole Grain
Look for foods with the following ingredients
listed first on the ingredient list
  • Whole oats
  • Whole rye
  • Whole wheat
  • Wild rice
  • Popcorn
  • Quinoa
  • Brown rice
  • Bulgur
  • Graham flour
  • Oatmeal
  • Whole-grain corn

41
Whole Grains Tricky Wording
  • The following words usually do not mean that the
    food is a whole grain
  • Multi-grain
  • Stone ground
  • 100 wheat
  • Cracked wheat
  • Seven grain
  • Bran

42
New Grain Labels
Good Source A ½ serving of whole grain
Excellent Source A full serving of whole grain
100 / Excellent A full serving and all the
grains are whole grain
43
Grain Consumption vs Recommendation
44
Trick or Wheat?
This delicious multi-grain loaf of bread is 99
fat free, features no preservatives, contains no
cholesterol and is made from all natural
ingredients.
  • Ingredients
  • Enriched flour, honey,
  • Brown sugar, cornmeal,
  • Wheat bran, black and
  • White sesame seeds,
  • poppy seeds, yeast
  • and salt.

45
Trick or Wheat?
The perfect bread for Americans who are watching
their health. Healthy Life Bread is the answer!
46
Trick or Wheat?
The most natural and nutritious, best tasting
breads available. 
SPROUTED WHEAT, RAISIN CINNAMON BAGELS
  • Ingredients
  • Stoneground organic whole
  • wheat, sprouted organic wheat
  • berries, filtered water,
  • stoneground organic white
  • flour, organic raisins, cinnamon,
  • unrefined sea salt.

47
Trick or Wheat?
Warburtons Stoneground Wholemeal loaf is made
with the finest stoneground flour for a
mouth-watering taste and texture.
  • Stoneground Wheat Bread

Ingredients Stoneground wheat flour, rye,
pumpkin seeds, sunflower seed, wheat protein,
malt, sea salt, fresh yeast.
48
Whole Grain Samples
  • Provided by
  • Sales West Marketing, Hill Marketing, and Elite
    Foods

49
Milk and Milk Products
  • 3 Servings of Milk or Milk Equivalent daily
  • Servings
  • 1 cup of fat-free or low-fat milk
  • 1 ½ ounces of cheese
  • 1 cup of Yogurt
  • 4 oz Cottage Cheese

50
Why Is Milk So Important?
  • Our body does not make calcium and calcium is
    needed for several body functions
  • Calcium supplements do not provide the same
    nutrients as milk
  • The body absorbs nutrients from milk easier then
    from supplements

51
Antioxidants
  • What are they?
  • Chemical compounds that prevent damage caused by
    particles called free radicals (destructive O2
    molecules)
  • Anti (against) oxidation (change caused by
    oxygen)
  • You body cannot make them so you must eat or
    drink them

52
Antioxidants
  • If free radicals are not neutralized they can
    damage cells.
  • This damage can lead changes related to normal
    aging. They can also lead to more serious
    problems such as heart disease, stroke, and cancer

53
Antioxidants
  • Currently no recommendation on the daily amount
    needed
  • You should try to get as many as you can and try
    to get them from foods not supplements
  • Sources
  • Fruits and vegetables (fresh, frozen or canned)
  • Nuts, seeds, legumes (dried beans and peas)
  • Whole grain breads and cereals
  • Foods w/ highest levels of antioxidants
    blueberries, cranberries, spinach, broccoli,
    pomegranate juice, and tea

54
Fluid Recommendations
  • Guidelines recommend listening to your own thirst
    mechanism
  • Another option
  • Fluid Equation
  • 1. Take Your Weight and divide by 2.2 to get
    kilograms
  • 2. Multiply that number by 30 (by 25 if
    overweight)
  • 3. Divide that number by 240
  • 4. The number you get equals the of cups of
    fluid you should drink per day

55
Thirsty?
56
Fats
57
Fat Is Not BAD
  • The role of fat in a healthy diet
  • Source of energy
  • Aids in absorption of vitamins
  • Provides tastes, consistency, and stability
  • Provides satiety

58
Types of Fats
  • Saturated fats
  • Found in animal products, whole milk and cheese
    and many processed foods.
  • Raise LDL (bad cholesterol)
  • Solid at room temperature
  • Sources
  • Cheese
  • Beef
  • Whole Milk
  • Salad dressings
  • Poultry
  • Snack chips
  • Eggs
  • Ice cream
  • Cakes/cookies/doughnuts
  • Butter/Margarine
  • Yeast Bread

59
Types of Fats
  • Unsaturated fats
  • Found in plants and some seafood
  • Includes monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated
    fats
  • Do not raise LDL, may lower it
  • Sources
  • Sunflower, corn, peanut, canola and olive oil
  • Fish (tuna, salmon, etc)
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Avocados

60
Types of Fats
  • Trans Fats
  • When a fat is hydrogenated turning it from liquid
    to a solid
  • Purpose to help make the fat more stable
    (lengthen shelf life)
  • Confusing Part
  • Partially hydrogenated products do contain trans
    fats
  • Fully hydrogenated products do not contain trans
    fats
  • KEY Look for the word partially hydrogenated on
    the ingredient label and try to avoid foods with
    these.

61
Trans Fat
  • Why are Trans Fats unhealthy?
  • Linked to increased risk of heart disease
  • No recommendation on amount of Trans Fat to eat
    per day so eat as few trans fats as you can
  • The Good News Americans dont eat a lot of trans
    fats, food companies are now required to have
    trans fats on their label, and a lot of snack
    companies are working to cut trans fats out of
    their products

62
Trans Fats
  • Sources of Trans Fats vegetable shortenings,
    some margarines (hard-stick type), crackers,
    candies, cookies, snacks, baked goods, fried
    foods, and dressings
  • 80 of trans fats come from processed foods
  • 20 come from natural foods (meats, dairy)

63
How Much Unhealthy Fat is in this Cookie?
Saturated Fat 4 g
Trans fat 2 g
Combined Total Unhealthy Fat 6 g
64
Recommendations
  • Consume less than 10 of calories from saturated
    fat and less than 300mg/day of cholesterol
  • Keep trans fat intake as low as possible
  • Keep total fat between 20-35 of calories w/ most
    fat coming from poly and monounsaturated fats

65
Recommendations
  • Limit intake of fats and oils high in saturated
    and/or trans fatty acids
  • Children and Adolescents
  • Age 2-3 30-35 of calories from fat
  • Age 4-18 25-35 of calories from fat

66
Carbohydrates
67
Importance of Carbohydrates
  • Carbohydrates are an essential part of a healthy
    diet
  • Carbohydrates provide fiber which may help reduce
    chances of certain cancers
  • Carbohydrates are the bodies main source of
    energy. They supply energy to the brain and
    central nervous system

68
Complex Carbs
  • Starches-flour, bread, rice, corn, oats,
  • barley, potatoes, fruits, and vegetables
  • Insoluble Fiber whole wheat breads and cereals,
    wheat bran, cabbage, beets, carrots, cauliflower
  • Soluble Fiber oat bran, oats, legumes, citrus
    fruits, strawberries, apples, rice and bran

69
Simple Carbs
  • Table sugar, brown sugar, confectioners sugar,
    raw sugar
  • Fruit, vegetables, and honey
  • High fructose corn syrup
  • Sugar alcohols
  • Milk and milk products
  • Cereal and some baked goods

70
Carbohydrate Recommendations
  • Choose fiber-rich fruits, vegetables, and whole
    grains often
  • Choose and prepare foods and beverages with
    little added sugars or caloric sweeteners
  • 45-65 of calories should come from carbohydrates

71
Sodium and Potassium
72
Recommendations
  • Consume less than 2,300 mg of sodium/day (approx.
    1 tsp of salt)
  • Choose and prepare foods with little salts
  • Eat foods high in potassium such as fruits and
    vegetables

73
Simple Ways to Reduce Salt Intake
  • Take the salt shaker off the table
  • Use other spices to enhance foods
  • Once you decrease salt in your diet after a
    period of time your taste will adjust to the
    lower amount
  • Read labels
  • A food that is low in sodium will have less than
    140mg
  • Eat foods in their natural form (processed foods
    are high in sodium)

74
Importance of Potassium
  • Diets rich in potassium helps fight the negative
    effects from sodium
  • May help reduce the risk of kidney stones
  • May help decrease bone loss with age

75
Potassium Rich Foods
  • Potatoes, sweet potatoes
  • Yogurt
  • Tuna
  • Lima beans
  • Bananas
  • Pork chops
  • Trout
  • Milk
  • Lentils
  • Orange juice
  • Cantaloupe
  • Prunes
  • Tomato juice
  • Carrot juice
  • Soybeans
  • Spinach

76
Alcoholic Beverages
77
Alcohol
  • Moderation
  • Drink sensibly
  • Women 1 drink
  • Men 2 drinks
  • Avoid alcohol pregnant women, children,
    adolescents, those on certain medications
  • This is the only recommendation that has not
    changed from previous guidelines

78
Food Safety
79
  • Clean hands, surfaces, fruits and vegetables
  • Separate raw, cooked, and ready to eat foods
    while preparing and storing foods
  • Cook foods to safe temperatures
  • Chill perishable foods promptly
  • Defrost foods properly
  • Avoid raw milk, eggs, meat, poultry, juices,
    sprouts

80
School Meals and the Dietary Guidelines
81
Recommended Changes in School Meals
  • Increase the amount of whole grains-making at
    least ½ of the grains served whole grains
  • Increase the amounts and variety of fruits and
    vegetables
  • Provide plenty of fat-free or low-fat milk
  • Prepare meat products that are low in fat

82
Recommended Changes in School Meals
  • Serve More
  • Dark green veg.
  • Orange veg.
  • Legumes
  • Fruits
  • Whole grains
  • Low-fat milk products
  • Serve Less
  • Refined grains
  • Total fats
  • Cholesterol
  • Saturated fats
  • Trans fats
  • Added sugars
  • Sodium

83
Menu Activity
  • Using what you have learned so far in the class,
    work in teams of 2 and re-write the menu that is
    being handed out (yellow paper). Be ready to
    discuss why you made the changes you did with the
    group.

84
My Pyramid
85
Final Graphic Design
  • Activity Proportionality
  • Moderation Variety
  • Personalization Gradual

  • Improvement

86
Food Groups are Color Coded
87
MyPyramid Recommendations Compared to Consumption
Bars show percent change needed in consumption to
meet recommendations
Increases Current Consumption Decreases
Fruits Vegetables Grains Meat
Beans Milk
88
Fat, Oil Added Sugars Allowances Compared to
Consumption
Bars show percent change needed in consumption to
meet recommendations
Increases Current Consumption Decreases
Solid fats Oils
Added sugars
89
Vegetable Recommendations Compared to Consumption
Consumed
Recommended
Females 31-50
90
Message Proportionality
  • In the Dietary Guidelines
  • Adopt a balanced eating pattern.
  • Sufficient amount of fruits and vegetables,
  • 3 or more ounce equivalents of whole-grain
    products per day
  • 3 cup equivalents per day of fat-free or low-fat
    milk or milk products.
  • In MyPyramid graphic
  • Differing widths of the color bands suggest
    about how much food should be eaten from each
    group.

91
Message Moderation
  • In the Dietary Guidelines
  • Limit intake of saturated and trans fats, and
    choose products low in these fats.
  • Make choices of meat, poultry, dry beans, and
    milk products that are lean, low-fat, or
    fat-free.
  • Choose and prepare foods and beverages with
    little added sugars or calorie sweeteners.
  • In MyPyramid graphic
  • Food group bands narrow from
  • bottom to top suggesting to eat
  • nutrient-dense forms of foods.

92
Message Physical Activity
  • In the Dietary Guidelines
  • Engage in regular physical activity and reduce
    sedentary activities to promote health,
    psychological well-being, and a healthy body
    weight.
  • In MyPyramid graphic
  • Steps and person on them symbolize that physical
    activity should be a part of everyday healthy
    living.

93
Pyramid Servings
Daily Amounts in cups or ounces
94
MyPyramid Grains
  • Eat 6 ounce-equivalents (for a 2,000 calorie
    diet)
  • 3 ounce-equivalents or more of whole-grain
    products
  • The remaining grains should come from enriched or
    whole-grain products
  • 1 ounce-equivalent of a food from the grains
    group is
  • 1 slice bread
  • 1/2 cup cooked pasta, cooked rice or cooked
    cereal
  • 1 cup ready-to-eat cereal
  • Adapted from Mary Meck Higgins, PhD,. RD, LD,
    CDE, Kansas State University

95
Whole Grain Serving Sizes 3 oz of whole grains,
6 oz of total grains per day
½ cup brown rice 1 oz whole grain
5 whole grain crackers 1 oz whole grain
½ cup oatmeal 1 oz whole grain
3 cups popcorn 1 oz whole grain
1 slice whole grain bread 1 oz whole grain
1 cup whole wheat cereal 1 oz whole grain
96
Grain Serving Sizes
6 oz of total grains per day
1 piece 2 ½ by 2 ½ cornbread 2 oz grain
1 cup cereal 1 oz grain
18 diameter tortilla 2 oz grain
1 cup rice 2 oz grain
2 ½ oz bun 2 ½ oz grain
7 crackers 1 oz grain
97
MyPyramid Vegetables
  • Eat the equivalent of 2 1/2 cups of raw or cooked
    vegetables per day (for a 2,000 calorie diet)

Count 2 cups of raw leafy greens as equivalent to
1 cup of other vegetables
  • Adapted from Mary Meck Higgins, PhD,. RD, LD,
    CDE, Kansas State University

98
Vegetable Serving Sizes Need 2 ½ cups per day
½ cup juice ½ cup veg
½ cup cauliflower ½ cup veg
1 cup romaine ½ cup veg
½ cup beams ½ cup veg
1 large yam 1 cup veg
½ cup broccoli ½ cup veg
99
Vegetable Serving Sizes Need 2 ½ cups per day
½ cup zucchini ½ cup veg.
½ cup spinach ½ cup veg.
½ cup corn ½ cup veg.
1 cup iceberg lettuce ½ cup veg
½ cup mushrooms ½ cup veg.
½ cup green beans ½ cup veg.
100
MyPyramid Fruits
  • Eat the equivalent of 2 cups of fresh, canned or
    frozen fruits per day (for a 2,000 calorie diet)

Count 1/4 cup dried fruit, such as raisins, as
equivalent to 1/2 cup fruit
  • Adapted from Mary Meck Higgins, PhD,. RD, LD,
    CDE, Kansas State University

101
Fruit Serving Sizes 2 cups per day
1 medium bunch grapes 1 ½ cups fruit
2 large plums 1 cup fruit
1 small apple 1 cup fruit
½ cup juice ½ cup fruit
1 large banana (8 ) 1 cup fruit
102
Fruit Serving Sizes 2 cups per day
½ medium (4 diam) ½ cup fruit
½ cup ½ cup fruit
½ large peach ½ cup fruit
¼ cup raisins ½ cup fruit
1 small orange ½ cup fruit
103
MyPyramid Oils
  • Eat the equivalent of 6 teaspoons of oil (for a
    2,000 calorie diet) per day.
  • Most Americans consume enough oil in the foods
    they eat, such as
  • Nuts Salad dressings Cooking oil and Fish
  • 3 or 4 teaspoons of oil is equivalent to
  • 1 ounce of nuts or seeds, or 2 tablespoons of
    peanut butter
  • 1 tablespoon of tub or squeeze margarine without
    trans fats
  • 1 tablespoon of real mayonnaise
  • 3 tablespoons of some salad dressings
  • Adapted from Mary Meck Higgins, PhD,. RD, LD,
    CDE, Kansas State University

104
MyPyramid Dairy Products
  • Consume 3 cups per day of fat-free or low-fat
    milk or equivalent milk products
  • Children ages 2 to 8 2 cups per day
  • Children ages 9 up 3 cups per day
  • 1 cup (8 ounces) of milk is equivalent to
  • 1 cup yogurt
  • 1 1/2 oz. natural cheese, or 2 oz. processed
    cheese
  • Adapted from Mary Meck Higgins, PhD,. RD, LD,
    CDE, Kansas State University

105
Dairy Serving Sizes 3 cups per day
½ cup pudding (made w/ milk ½ cup milk
½ cup ½ cup milk
8 oz milk 1 cup milk
8 oz yogurt 1 cup milk
1/3 cup shredded 1 cup milk
2 slice (3/4 oz ea) 1 cup milk
106
MyPyramid Meat Beans
  • Eat 5 1/2 ounce-equivalents (for a 2,000 calorie
    diet). Choose lean meat and poultry. Vary your
    choices more fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds.
  • 1 ounce-equivalent of a meat and beans food is
  • 1 ounce meat, poultry or fish
  • 1/4 cup cooked dry beans or peas
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter
  • 1/2 ounce nuts or seeds
  • Adapted from Mary Meck Higgins, PhD,. RD, LD,
    CDE, Kansas State University

107
Meats and Beans 5, ½ oz equivalents per day
4 oz cooked w/o bone 4 oz meat
5 oz steak 5 oz meat
1 small half breast 3 oz meat
8 oz fish steak 8 oz meat
108
Meats and Beans 5, ½ oz equivalents per day
7 medium shrimp 2 oz meat
6 thin slices 2 oz meat
1 oz nuts 2 oz meat
½ cup beans 2 oz meat
109
A MyPyramid Serving is Usually Less Than a
Typical Helping
Source www.fns.usda.gov/tn/tnrockyrun/whatsa.htm
110
Key food group messages from the Dietary
Guidelines and MyPyramid
Focus on fruits.
Vary your veggies.
Get your calcium-rich foods.
Make half your grains whole.
Go lean with protein.
Know the limits on fats, salt, and sugars.
About PowerShow.com