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Business Continuity Planning Tool Kit

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Plan that enables critical services to be continually delivered to the ... financial/banking, water, power (hydro), gasoline/fuels, medicine, or the food supply ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Business Continuity Planning Tool Kit


1
Business Continuity Planning Tool Kit
  • Hiawatha First Nation
  • August 26, 2008

2
What is Business Continuity Planning?
  • Plan that enables critical services to be
    continually delivered to the community
  • Prepare BCP for each essential service/program

3
Business Continuity Plan Includes
  • Plans, measures, and arrangements to ensure the
    continuous delivery of critical services
  • Identification of necessary resources including
    personnel, information, financial allocations,
    legal council, infrastructure protection and
    accommodations to support business continuity
  • A Guide to Business Continuity Planning.
    Government of Canada, Office of Critical
    Infrastructure Protection and Emergency
    Preparedness, p. 3.

4
Where does BCP fit in Your Pandemic Plan?
  • Natural Disaster

Continuity of Essential Services
Biochemical Disaster
Pandemic
Nuclear Disaster
5
Lessons learned from Sept. 11 (1)
  • Plans must be updated and tested frequently
  • All types of threats must be considered
  • Dependencies and interdependencies should be
    carefully analyzed
  • key personnel may be unavailable
  • Telecommunications are essential
  • Alternate sites for IT should be situated close
    to the primary site

6
Lessons learned from Sept. 11 (2)
  • Employee support (counselling) is important
  • Copies of plans should be stored at off-site
    secure location
  • Sizable security perimeters may surround the
    scene of incidents involving law enforcement, and
    can impede personnel from returning to buildings
  • Increased uncertainty following a high impact
    disruption may lengthen time until operations are
    normalized
  • A Guide to Business Continuity Planning.
    Government of Canada, Office of Critical
    Infrastructure Protection and Emergency
    Preparedness, p. 2.

7
Important Components
  • Essential services/functions
  • Implications of service disruptions

8
Effects of a Pandemic on a Business
  • Reduced labour supply, including your employees
    or availability of subcontractors or temporary
    employees
  • Customer orders (cancelled or not filled)
  • Interruptions in getting supplies or materials
    (especially if imported by air or land, including
    goods that go through international borders and
    customs)
  • Change in demands (e.g. increased internet use,
    decreased tourism/travel)

9
Effects of a Pandemic on a Business
  • Reduction or restrictions on public meetings or
    gatherings (including sports, clubs, theatre,
    community centres, restaurants, religious
    gatherings, etc.)
  • Restrictions on travel (regional, national or
    international)
  • Reduced availability of health care or home care
    services

10
Effects of a Pandemic on a Business
  • In more extreme situations, possible disruptions
    in other services such as telecommunications,
    financial/banking, water, power (hydro),
    gasoline/fuels, medicine, or the food supply
  • Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and
    Safety. Business Pandemic Influenza Checklist, p.
    4

11
Emergency Planning Committee
  • Appoint someone to oversee the BCP process

12
Emergency Planning Committee
  • Points of Consideration
  • Use existing emergency planning
    committee/working group
  • Establish a new committee/working group if
    necessary
  • Committee members should be from the senior level
    with decision making authority

13
Emergency Planning Committee
  • List the members of your existing emergency
    planning team
  • For new committee
  • List key senior members with decision making
    power in your organization.
  • Representatives from each major business/program
  • From this list, narrow down to maximum of 8
    members

14
Each Essential Service Program
  • List all your essential services
  • In each essential service, list activities and
    the personnel/positions responsible for these
    activities
  • Ask the members of each program to categorize
    each activity in the 4 Levels of Program
    Components/Activities identified in the Ontario
    Health Pandemic Influenza Plan

15
4 Levels of Program Components/Activities
  • Priority Level A Must Do critical services,
    cannot be deferred or delegated.
  • Priority Level B High Priority do not defer
    if possible or bring back as soon as possible
  • Priority Level C Medium Priority can wait if
    Pandemic is not too long
  • Priority Level D Low Priority can be brought
    when the Pandemic is over
  • Ontario Health Pandemic Influenza Plan (2007),
    p. 13-3.

16
Each Essential Service Program
  • Identify the number of staff (by classification)
    to maintain service/function
  • Include essential services/functions created or
    increased by the surge activity.
  • Identify any special requirements necessary to
    perform these essential services/functions (e.g.
    licence to operate water treatment plant, etc.)

17
Each Essential Service Program
  • Identify and develop a skills sets list of all
    personnel in each program. This will help to
  • Cross train and reallocate staff within the
    business unit or across the corporation.
  • Document
  • E.g. Essential Services/Functions Staffing
    Allocations Table
  • Niagara Region Public Health Unit. Pandemic
    Influenza Response Plan Business Continuity
    Planning Toolkit, p. 12.

18
Identify and Document
  • Identify issues/implications that may arise as a
    result of reduction or cancellation of service.
  • Identify relevant issues/functions that may arise
    when the level of service is modified.

19
Identify and Document
  • Examples
  • Documentation Template Maintaining Essential
    Services/Functions
  • Niagara Region Public Health Unit. Pandemic
    Influenza Response Plan Business Continuity
    Planning Toolkit, p. 15
  • MOHLTC Emergency Preparedness Checklist
  • Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care
    (2006). Preparedness Checklist for your
    Agency/business.

20
Identify and Document
  • Examples
  • Business Continuity Plan Checklist
  • Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and
    Safety., Business Continuity Plan p. 8, 9.
  • Business Pandemic Influenza Checklist
  • Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and
    Safety. Business Pandemic Influenza Checklist.

21
Essential Service and Redeployment Availability
Worksheet(Adapted from Simcoe Muscoca District
Health Unit Pandemic Influenza Plan, p. 161)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Team Program Service/ Activity Prof. Designate Priority A/B/C/D Current FTE 100 FTE Min FTE Required FTE Available

22
Documentation Template Maintaining Essential
Services/Functions(Adapted from Niagara Region
Public Health Unit Pandemic Influenza Response
Plan Business Continuity Planning Toolkit)
Business Group
Essential Service (identify and provide brief description)
Individual/Position Responsible for implementing specific action plan Name (Phone Number) (Email Address)
Activation Procedure (describe)
Corporate and Community Impact Issues list any)
Action Plan (list action plan including notifications plans, communications strategy, staffing reallocations plans, use of other sector services, any change in scope of service delivery, monitoring and reporting needs, etc.)
Resource Needs (list needs and contact information for resource needs staffing, equipment, contracting out services) (Name and Business Address) (Phone Number) (Email Address)
Training Needs (outline training plan as required)
23
Revise, Test and Update
  • Once your Business Continuity Plan is complete,
    it will require at least annual review for
    necessary revisions.
  • Conducting emergency exercises will help you to
  • Understand your Business Continuity Plan
  • Identify strengths, gaps and needs.

24
References
  • A Guide to Business Continuity Planning.
    Government of Canada, Office of Critical
    Infrastructure Protection and Emergency
    Preparedness, p.2,3.
  • http//getprepared.gc.ca/_fl/bcont_e.pdf
  • Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care.
    Ontario Health Pandemic Influenza Plan (2007).
    Public Health Services, Section 7.4, pp. 58-60.
  • http//www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/pro
    gram/emu/pan_flue/ohpip_mn.html

25
References
  • Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care
    (2006). Preparedness Checklist for your
    Agency/business.
  • http//www.health.gov.on.ca/english/public/progra
    m/emu/plan_flu/guide.pdf
  • Pandemic Influenza Response Plan Business
    Continuity Planning Tool Kit (2006). Niagara
    Region Public Health.
  • www.regional.niagara.on.ca/living/health_wellness
    /pandemicplanning/pdf/NR_Pandemic_WKBK.pdf

26
References
  • Simcoe Muscoca District Health Unit Pandemic
    Influenza Plan (2006), p. 161 http//www.simcoemus
    kokahealth.org
  • Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and
    Safety. Business Continuity Plan, p. 4, 8, 9
  • http//www.ccohs.ca/pandemic/pdf/Business_continu
    ity.pdf
  • Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and
    Safety. Business Pandemic Influenza Checklist.
  • http//www.ccohs.ca/pandemic/type/checklist.html
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