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EPDA EJB: Topic 3

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Compile. Home Interface. Remote Interface. Bean's implementation class. Deploy the EJB ... Deployment Descriptors (an XML file) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: EPDA EJB: Topic 3


1
EPDA EJB Topic 3
  • Agenda
  • Client and EJB Interaction
  • EJB Taxonomy
  • Example writing an EJB

2
Architectural Overview Recap
  • To implement the entity and session enterprise
    beans we need to define the component
    interfaces, a bean class and a primary key
  • Remote interface
  • Defines beans business methods that can be
    accessed from the outside the EJB container.
  • The remote interface extends javax.ejb.EJBObject,
    which in turn extends java.rmi.Remote.
  • It is used by session and entity beans in
    conjunction with the remote home interface

3
Architectural Overview Recap
  • Remote home interface
  • Defines the beans life-cycle methods that can be
    accessed from applications outside the EJB
    container
  • i.e. methods for creating new beans, removing
    beans, and finding beans.
  • The home interface extends
  • javax.ejb.EJBHome which in turn extends
    java.rmi.Remote.
  • It is used by session and entity beans in
    conjunction with the remote interface

4
Architectural Overview Recap
  • EJB Local interface
  • Defines the business methods that can be used by
    other beans co-located in the same EJB container
  • The business methods a bean presents to other
    beans in the same address space.
  • Allows beans to interact without the overhead of
    distributed object protocol.
  • It extends javax.ejb.EjbLocalObject
  • It is used by session and entity beans in
    conjunction with local home interface.

5
Architectural Overview Recap
  • Local home interface
  • Defines the beans life-cycle methods that can be
    used by other beans co-located in the same EJB
    container
  • The life cycle methods a bean presents to other
    beans in the same address space.
  • Allows beans to interact without the overhead of
    distributed object protocol.
  • It extends javax.ejb.EjbLocalHome
  • It is used by session and entity beans in
    conjunction with local interface.

6
Architectural Overview Recap
  • Bean class
  • The session and entity bean classes actually
    implement the beans business and life-cycle
    methods.
  • It must have methods that match the signatures of
    the methods defined in the remote and local
    interfaces.
  • An entity bean must implement javax.ejb.EntityBean
  • A session bean must implement javax.ejb.SessionBea
    n
  • They both in turn extend javax.ejb.EnterpriseBean

7
Architectural Overview Recap
  • Primary Key
  • A simple class that provides a pointer into the
    database.
  • Only entity beans need primary key.
  • This class implements java.io,Serializable
  • Note
  • The message-driven beans do not use any of the
    component interfaces. They are never called from
    other applications or beans.
  • Instead they contain a single method,
    onMessage(), which is called by the container
    when a new message arrives.

8
Client and EJB Interaction
  • The client interacts with the EJB in 5 steps
  • The container registers the EJB with the naming
    service during deployment time.
  • The naming service in the application server
    provides the client with a Naming Context.
  • The naming context can be used by the client to
    lookup the EJB name in the naming service.
  • The naming service then returns the reference to
    the home interface
  • The client uses the create method of the home
    interface.
  • A reference to remote interface is returned to
    the client.
  • The client can use the remote reference to invoke
    business methods.

9
Client and EJB Interaction
Application Server
EJB Container
EJB Home Interface
5
Client
4
EJB Remote
3
1
Namining Service
2
Naming Context
10
EJB Taxonomy
Enterprise java Beans
Message-Driven EJBs
Entity EJBs
Session EJBs
Stateful Session EJB
Container-Managed Persistence
Bean-managed persistence
Stateful Session EJB
11
Entity EJBs
  • They can live as long as data remains in the
    database
  • Entity beans are Persistent
  • Offers shared access to multiple users
  • Represents an object view of data in the
    information database.
  • Can take two types of persistence
  • Container Managed persistence
  • Bean-managed persistence.

12
Entity EJB Container-managed persistence (CMP)
  • Container tools will be used to make database
    calls.
  • Beans are not tightly coupled to database()
  • Can code complex relationships ()
  • With CMP it is difficult to handle dynamic SQL (-)

13
Entity EJB Bean-managed persistence (BMP)
  • The developer needs to write the interface to the
    database.
  • Advantage
  • Bean can be deployed in any container without the
    container having to make calls to the database.
  • Shortcomings
  • Different data needs rewriting of the bean and
  • it can get very complicated!

14
Session EJB
  • Session beans are relatively short lived
  • Do not represent shared data directly in the
    database, but can update and access the data
  • If the container crashes the session EJB will no
    longer exist.
  • Container has to replace it with a new session
    object to continue the operation
  • Session beans can be stateless or stateful.

15
Stateless Session EJB
  • Do not retain conversational state.
  • But they are easy to develop and very efficient.
  • Can service many clients with the use of pooling
    service.
  • Connection pooling is a technique used for
    sharing server resources among requesting clients
  • Given that entity beans are shared components,
    for every client request, the database
    connections are acquired and released several
    times.

16
Connection pooling Source javaworld.com
  • Acquiring and releasing database connections via
    the database manager, using JDBC 1.0, will impact
    the performance on the EJB layer.

17
Connection Pooling Source javaworld.com
  • The JDBC 2.0 Standard Extension API specifies
    that a database service provider can implement a
    pooling technique that can allow multiple
    connection objects from a resource pool to be
    shared transparently among the requesting
    clients.

18
Stateful Session EJB
  • Retain conversational state with a single client
  • They run on behalf of the client in a 1-to-1
    relationship

19
Message-Driven EJB
  • Similar to a session bean, except it responds to
    a JMS message rather than an RMI event.
  • Stateless and short-lived
  • Can update shared data in the database
  • If the container crashes the message-driven EJB
    will no longer exist.
  • Container has to replace it with a new
    message-driven object to continue the operation

20
Example Writing a HelloWorld EJB
  • This example involves the following steps to
    write the HelloWorld EJB
  • Write home Interface
  • Write remote Interface
  • Write beans implementation
  • Compile
  • Home Interface
  • Remote Interface
  • Beans implementation class
  • Deploy the EJB
  • Write the client
  • Run the client

21
Step1 Building the Home Interface
  • The bean will be created here
  • The interface must be public and
  • Must have a create() method
  • The home interface will be

Import java.rmi.RemoteException Import
javax.ejb. public interface HeloWorldHome
extends EJBHOME public HelloWorld create()
throws RemoteException, CreateException
Name of EJB remote interface
22
Step2 Building the Remote Interface
  • Here we declare all the functionality supported
    by the EJB component
  • Declare every method that is supported by the EJB
  • Methods must throw RemoteException
  • The remote interface will be

Import java.rmi.RemoteException Import
javax.ejb.EJBObject public interface HeloWorld
extends EJBObject public String getHelloWorld
(String message) throws RemoteException
23
Step 3 Building the EJB Implementation
  • This EJB class should implement
  • All of the methods defined in home interface and
    remote interface
  • Methods that are defined in the SessionBean
    interface
  • Any error will be detected at deployment time

24
Step 3 Building the EJB Implementation Continued
  • HelloWorld EJB implementation

Import javax.ejb.SessionBean Import
javax.ejb.SessionContext public class
HelloworldEJB implements SessionBean public
string getHelloworld (String message)
return Hello World from EPDA …gt message
\n Have fun public HelloWorldEJB()
public void ejbCreate() public void
ejbRemove() public void ejbActivate()
//details to be followed later public void
ejbPassivate() //details to be followed later
public voidsetSessionContext (sessionContext sc)

25
Step 4 Compile the Bean
  • Compile using the following commands
  • Javac HelloWorld.java HelloworldHome.java
    HelloWorldEJB.java
  • Use ant (or asant)
  • Strongly recommended
  • Use it as your Build tool.

26
Step 5 Deploy the Bean
  • Deployment is the process of installing an EJB in
    an EJB container
  • The deployment process varies between different
    application servers.
  • But it generally requires the following items
  • EJB home interface
  • EJB remote interface
  • Bean class
  • Deployment Descriptors (an XML file)
  • A range of features for a given EJB that are
    provided by the container will be made available
    to the developer.
  • The EJB compiler uses these four items to
    generate JAR files needed for deployment process
  • Now the EJBs can be deployed
  • Can use the command line or
  • A deployment tool

27
Step 6 Write the Client
  • The client implements the following
  • Obtains the naming context of the application
    server
  • Context initial new InitialContext ()
  • Looks up the EJB name
  • HelloWorldHome
  • home1 (HelloWorldHome) initial.lookup
    (myHelloWorld)
  • Creates an EJB instance
  • HelloWorld hw home1.create ()
  • Invoke the required methods
  • String msg hw.getHelloWorld ( ..thank God
    its Easter Break Soon!)

28
Step 6 Write the Client ….
  • import javax.naming.
  • public class Helloworld
  • public static void main (String args)
  • try
  • Context initial new InitialContext ()
  • HelloWorldHome home1 (HelloWorldHome)
    initial.lookup (myHelloWorld)
  • HelloWorld hw home1.create ()
  • String msg hw.getHelloWorld ( ..thank God
    its EasterBreak Soon!)
  • system.out.println (msg)
  • catch (Exception ex)
  • system.err.println (Exception!!)
  • ex.printStackTrace()

29
Step 7 Running the Client
  • We can execute this client
  • java HelloWorldClient
  • The result must look like as follows

Hello World from EPDA …gt …thank God its Easter
Break Soon! Have fun
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