Results and Analysis of the 2008 Biological Sciences Division Postdoctoral Association Survey - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Results and Analysis of the 2008 Biological Sciences Division Postdoctoral Association Survey PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 247899-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Results and Analysis of the 2008 Biological Sciences Division Postdoctoral Association Survey

Description:

Results and Analysis of the 2008 Biological Sciences Division Postdoctoral Association Survey – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:24
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 83
Provided by: natachabo
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Results and Analysis of the 2008 Biological Sciences Division Postdoctoral Association Survey


1
Results and Analysis of the 2008 Biological
Sciences Division Postdoctoral Association Survey
Benjamin Wolfe, Natacha Bodenhausen, and Luciana
Molinero
2
Question 1. What is the source of funding that
supports you?
Male fellows possessing individual fellowships
outnumber female fellows with individual
fellowships 21. Interestingly, a higher
percentage of foreign postdocs have individual
fellowships than their American counterparts
(17 vs. 13.5), but a much higher percentage of
Americans are funded through training grants than
foreign postdocs (30 vs. 9).
3
Question 2. How many first author publications
have you had while working as a postdoc at the
University of Chicago (published or in press
manuscripts only)?
Most postdocs have not yet published a
first-author manuscript while working in their
postdoc at the University of Chicago. When the
data are filtered over length of time at the
University, it is clear that as the length of
time of the postdoc increases, the chances are
greater that one will publish a first-author
manuscript.
4
Question 3. How many total author publications
have you Had while working as a postdoc at the
University of Chicago (published or in press
manuscripts only)?
Most postdocs have not yet published a manuscript
while working in their postdoc at the University
of Chicago. When the data are filtered over
length of time at the University, it is clear
that as the length of time of the postdoc
increases, the chances are greater that one will
publish a manuscript(s).
5
Question 4. Have you written a grant proposal for
a fellowship or any other type of funding?
Nearly 90 of the postdoc community have either
written a grant proposal or intend to do so at
some point in their postdoctoral training. When
broken down by citizenship, it is clear that a
much higher percentage of American postdocs have
already written proposals compared with foreign
postdocs (75 and 49, respectively).
6
Question 5. Have you presented your work (either
poster or oral presentation) at any of the
following (please check all that apply)?
Nearly all postdocs have presented their work in
a lab meeting environment, with around a third of
the population having presented at departmental
seminars and national conferences.
7
Question 6. How many professional conferences
have you attended in the last year?
Nearly half of the total postdoctoral population
did not attend a professional conference in the
last year. When the data are filtered for
citizenship, it is evident that American postdocs
are attending more conferences than their foreign
counterparts.
8
Question 7. What is the gender of your advisor?
Again this year, an overwhelming majority of
postdoc advisors are male versus female (66 to
34). However, this percentage is getting more
balanced when compared with last year, in which
80 of postdoc advisors were male.
9
Question 8. How satisfied are you with the
mentoring you receive in your laboratory?
Nearly 60 of all postdocs report that they are
satisfied with the mentoring they receive in the
laboratory. When the data are filtered for
number of years of experience at the University
of Chicago, it is clear that the level of
satisfaction declines the further along the
postdoc progresses, with postdocs in the first
year being quite satisfied (82) and postdocs who
have been here for more than 5 years only 26
satisfied.
10
Question 9. On average, how often do you meet
with your advisor to discuss your project?
On average, the majority of postdocs meet with
their advisor weekly to discuss their projects.
11
Question 10. Please rate your advisor in the
following categories
The majority of postdocs rate their advisors as
good in each of the categories surveyed. A
higher percentage of postdocs responded no
comment for the conflict resolution and
teaching queries, thus lowering the score for
those categories.
12
Question 11. Do you have a non-peer scientific
mentor whom you trust other than your advisor?
Fewer than half of the postdoctoral community has
a non-peer scientific mentor whom they trust
other than their advisor. When filtered for
citizenship, more American postdocs possess an
additional mentor than their foreign counterparts
(65 vs. 34).
13
Question 12. Have you ever received a performance
evaluation while working as a postdoc at the
University of Chicago?
Less than one-fifth of the postdoc community have
ever received a performance evaluation while
working as a postdoc at the University of
Chicago. When the data are filtered for postdoc
positions, it is clear that the Research
Professional Associates and Research
Assistant/Associate Professors are the ones
receiving the performance evaluations.
Performance evaluations provide a solid review
of key expectations, quality of performance
standard, and directions for future changes. An
annual performance evaluation encourages periodic
and structured communication between advisors and
postdocs and should take place continuously.
14
Question 13. Do you wish to receive an annual
performance evaluation?
Only half of the community wishes to receive an
annual performance evaluation.
15
Question 14. Have you experienced a significant
work-related grievance(s) during your
postdoctoral training?
Less than 20 of the population reported to have
had a significant work-related grievance during
their postdoctoral training. When the data were
filtered, more foreign postdocs and female
postdocs experienced grievances that were not
resolved successfully compared with American
postdocs and male postdocs, respectively.
16
Question 15. Should you experience a work-related
grievance, from whom would you seek advice
(please check all that apply)?
Most postdocs would seek advice from their
advisors and co-workers should they experience a
work-related grievance.
17
Question 16. Would you benefit from a counselor
other than your advisor in grievance/conflict
resolution?
Of the total population, a slight majority of the
postdoc community reported that they would
benefit from a counselor other than their advisor
skilled in conflict/grievance management. When
the data are filtered for those reporting
work-related grievances, an overwhelming majority
(87.5) wish to have such an arbitrator.
18
Question 17. What is your current individual
gross (pre-tax) income?
For the first 2 to 3 years, postdocs are likely
to receive a stipend level consistent with the
NIH NRSA pay scale. After that, the trend
discontinues.
19
Question 17. What is your current individual
gross (pre-tax) income?
With this years survey, we do not see the same
discrepancy between male and female stipend
levels, although there may be a difference for
postdocs earning their PhDs in 2006. Again this
year, fellows are more likely to receive a higher
stipend level than scholars.
20
Question 17. What is your current individual
gross (pre-tax) income?
21
Question 17. What is your current individual
gross (pre-tax) income?
22
Question 17. What is your current individual
gross (pre-tax) income?
Some departments are repeat offenders when it
comes to paying the NIH NRSA pay scale some
postdocs in BMB and Human Genetics reported that
they receive less than the stipend level mandated
by the BSD again this year.
23
Question 18. Taking into account todays national
market and your level of experience, do you feel
that this is an appropriate level of
compensation?
Nearly 3/4ths of the community feel as though
their level of compensation is not consistent
with their level of experience and the national
market. Perhaps this reflects the lack of
increase in NRSA stipend levels dating back to
fiscal year 2006.
24
Question 19. If you have been a postdoc for more
than 1 year, have you received a raise in the
past year?
Nearly 90 of postdocs who have more than 1 year
of experience did receive a raise in the past
year. When the data are filtered, foreign
postdocs are twice as likely to not receive a
raise as American postdocs. Interestingly, fewer
RPAs received a raise than actually received one
in the last year.
25
Question 20. Are you married or partnered?
Nearly 2/3rds of the postdoc community are either
married or partnered.
26
Question 21. Is your spouse or partner employed?
Half of the postdoc community have a working
spouse or partner. When the data are filtered
for citizenship, nearly five-fold higher
non-citizens have spouses or partners who do not
work.
27
Question 22. What are your total housing and
transportation costs per month? Please include
the following mortgage payment/rent, basic
utilities, association fees, car payment,
gasoline, tolls, public transit expenses.
The majority of the postdoc community spends
between 1001 and 1500 on housing and
transportation per month. This equates to roughly
one-third of the average pre-tax monthly income.
28
Question 23. Do you rent or own your primary
residence?
More than 80 of the postdoc community rents
their primary residence. When the data are
filtered for citizenship, nearly 6 times as many
US Citizens own their primary residence compared
with non-citizens.
29
Question 24. Approximately how far do you live
from campus?
The majority of postdocs report that they live
less than 2 miles from campus. When the data are
filtered for gender, it is clear that male
postdocs tend to live closer to campus than
female postdocs. A similar trend exists when
comparing citizens from non-citizens more
non-citizens live close to campus compared with
US citizens.
30
Question 25. How do you regularly commute to
campus (please check all that apply)?
Consistent with the majority of postdocs living
within a couple of miles of campus, most postdocs
report that they walk to campus. Others utilize
public transportation or commute via bike or car.
31
Question 26. Do you have children?
Just over a quarter of the postdoc community have
children.
32
Question 27. Excluding tuition, what are your
approximate childcare costs per month?
Of the postdocs with children, the majority spend
1001 and more on childcare expenses.
33
Question 28. How satisfied are you with the
childcare options available to you?
While the majority of postdocs respond that they
are somewhat satisfied with the childcare options
that are available to them, more are unsatisfied
than satisfied with their childcare options.
When the data are filtered for distance from
campus, those postdocs living 10 to 15 miles from
campus appear to be most satisfied with their
childcare options. In contrast, those living
between 5 and 10 miles from campus were the most
unsatisfied. The reason(s) for satisfaction/unsati
sfaction were not examined.
34
Question 29. If available, would you utilize a
childcare facility offered by the University of
Chicago at its Hyde Park campus?
Greater than 60 of postdocs with children
reported that they would utilize a childcare
facility offered by the University of Chicago.
This does not only apply to those postdocs living
in the immediate University of Chicago area, but
also applies to those living farther away from
campus. Still, this trails off the farther the
postdoc lives from campus.
35
Question 30. What is the primary reason you chose
to take a postdoctoral position?
Most believe that working in a postdoctoral
position is a necessary step prior to obtaining a
desired permanent position. Nearly the entire
rest of the community took their postdoctoral
position to gain additional training in either
their area or a different one.
36
Question 31. What are your primary long-term
career plans?
Three-fourths of the population wishes to remain
in academia, either in research or teaching-based
environments. The next highest percentages of
career plans appear to be industrial research
(9.4) and undecided (8.8). A higher percentage
of foreign postdocs, while fewer female postdocs,
aim to remain in a research-based academic
position than their American counterparts and
male counterparts, respectively.
37
Question 31.What are your primary long-term
career plans?
Very similar proportions of scholars and fellows
aim to obtain research-based academic positions.
Interestingly, nearly double the amount of
fellows desire teaching-based positions in
academia when compared with scholars. Relative to
the total population, a disproportionate amount
of RPAs desire a career in industry. When the
data are filtered for the year a postdoc earned
his/her Ph.D., an interesting and perhaps
slightly disturbing trend is apparent those
postdocs earning their Ph.D.s 4 to 5 years ago
seem to become more confused about their careers
as they become more and more separated from their
receipt of degree.
38
Question 32. What are your secondary long-term
career plans?
The majority of postdocs, in particular those
whose primary career plan is to stay in academia,
favor Industrial Research as their secondary
long-term career plans.
39
Question 33. How confident are you that you will
attain your specified career plan?
Although the outlook is bleak in academia (rated
as fair to poor by the population), most postdocs
are confident in their ability to attain their
career goals. Those postdocs aiming for a career
in consulting appear the most confident with
respect to attaining career goals, while those
desiring a career in industry appear the least
confident.
40
Question 34. Have your career plans changed since
taking your postdoctoral position?
Nearly half of all postdocs have changed their
career plans since taking their postdoc position.
When the data are filtered for year degree was
earned, it is clear that plan have increasingly
changed for more experienced postdocs.
41
Question 34. Have your career plans changed since
taking your postdoctoral position?
  • Specific comments are listed below.
  • previously thought that I wanted to be a PI.
  • I came in sure I wanted to teach at the college
    level. I am no longer sure that I want to
    (financial and work/life balance reasons).
  • Not sure I will pursue a tenure track academic
    career
  • Originally thinking of going to industry, but
    now interested in academia
  • I decided to stay in US
  • Now considering industrial research
  • did not seriously consider teaching as an option
  • Published well in previous post-doc, but no
    publications so far from this one after nearly 4
    years
  • Am considering industry more
  • Just left U of C a month ago to become a high
    school teacher and adjunct college instructor.

42
Question 35. If your career plans have changed,
what is the primary reason for this change?
The difficulty experienced in balancing family
with a career appears to be the primary reason
for changing a postdocs career ambitions.
Difficulty in obtaining the desired position and
salary were reported as close runners-up.
43
Question 36. To this point, how well do you feel
your postdoctoral training is preparing you for
your specified career plan?
The majority of postdocs feel as though their
postdoctoral position is preparing them well for
their specified career plan. Not surprisingly,
those with an undecided career plan are unsure
about the merits of their postdoc training with
respect to their career.
44
Question 37. During your time as a postdoc, have
you sought out any additional training
independent from the lab aimed at better
preparing you for your specified career plan
(e.g. coursework, teaching, etc.)?
Consistent with a large percentage desiring a
career in research, nearly 80 of postdocs have
not sought additional training independent from
the lab. When the data are filtered for primary
career choice, it is clear those postdocs hoping
to enter into the Consulting field feel as though
they need additional training they cant
otherwise receive in the laboratory.
45
Question 37. During your time as a postdoc, have
you sought out any additional training
independent from the lab aimed at better
preparing you for your specified career plan
(e.g. coursework, teaching, etc.)?
  • Specific comments are listed below.
  • teaching, 2nd career training
  • mentoring summer students
  • coursework, collaboration
  • Workshops
  • Workshops
  • teaching
  • coursework
  • interacting with PIs from other areas of my
    interest
  • asked to lecture courses taught by mentor
  • sitting in on classes
  • independent reading of books on career
    development, leadership skills, etc
  • Attending workshops
  • access training
  • Course on statistical genetics
  • coursework, self-study
  • Wanted to but not encouraged to and no time
  • Completed certification courses offered by the
    University
  • Summer courses specific to my field

46
Question 38. How often do you meet with your
advisor to discuss career goals and your progress
towards meeting them?
Most postdocs meet with their advisors to discuss
career goals quarterly. Unfortunately, a similar
percentage have not met with their advisors to
discuss career goals.
47
Question 39. How supportive of your career plan
is your advisor?
For the most part, postdocs perceive their
advisor as being supportive of their career
plans. Still, nearly a quarter of the population
reports that their advisor is not aware of their
career plans. The majority of these postdocs
desire a career in Consulting, Industry, or are
Undecided about their future.
48
Question 40. What is your perception of the job
market in academia in your field?
The majority of the postdoc community perceives
the job market in academia to be fair to poor.
When the data are filtered, fewer foreign
postdocs perceive the academic job market to be
good or excellent when compared with American
postdocs.
49
Question 41. What is your perception of the job
market outside of academia in your field?
The job market outside of academia is perceived
as being more favorable than academia, with a
ranking of fair to good. Again, US postdocs
appear more positive about the job market than
foreign postdocs.
50
Question 42. Are you currently looking for a
permanent position?
About 40 of the postdoc community is currently
looking for a permanent position, although most
are not looking very seriously. Not surprisingly,
the longer it has been since a postdoc has earned
his/her Ph.D., the greater the chance that he/she
is looking for a permanent position. More male
postdocs are currently on the job market than
female postdocs.
51
Question 43. If you were to look for a permanent
position, would you seek assistance from any of
the following (please check all that apply)?
Should they decide to look for a permanent
position, most postdocs would seek assistance
from their advisors. They would also seek aid
from peers, other advisors, CAPS, and
career-oriented websites.
52
Question 44 and 46. Insurance coverage through
Garnett Powers and Associates
  • Most postdocs have insurance through
    Garnett-Powers
  • Most of them found the enrollment process
    straightforward

53
Question 45. Please indicate in which of the
following benefit plants offered by
Garnett-Powers you are enrolled?
  • the most popular benefit plant is healthcare
  • only 13.5 of the enrolled postdocs are enrolled
    in supplemental life insurance

54
Question 48 and 40. How would you rate the
coverage offered by Garnett-Powers
  • 54, 40 of the enrolled postdocs are satisfied
    with the medical, respectively dental coverage
  • 18, 11 are not satisfied with the medical,
    respectively dental coverage
  • 28, 50 of the postdocs have no opinion on the
    medical, respectively dental coverage, maybe
    because they did not use it yet.

55
Question 50. Have you delayed or forgone
treatment due to inadequate insurance coverage
from Garnett-Powers?
  • Comments
  • I have not been able to use my dental insurance
    at all b/c I can't find a reputable,
    board-certified dentist that takes this insurance
    in the Hyde Park/Kenwood area.
  • The plan won't pay the percentage of coverage
    they should for my dental expenses and I can't
    afford myself.
  • they do not provide vision coverage with my eye
    doctor so I decided not to do my eye exam
  • I am delaying appointments (that I should have
    in the fall/winter of 2008) so they all happen in
    the next calendar year gtgt and the deductible will
    be charged only in 2009. This did not happen with
    our previous University-sponsored insurance.
  • Genetic Testing for Celiac Disease
  • Nightguard for teeth
  • dental treatment

56
Question 47. Do you have dependent-coverage on
any of the plans?
  • only 29 of postdocs have dependent-coverage

57
Question 48 and 49. How would you rate the
coverage offered by Garnett-Powers?
Consistent with the overall intention to
normalize health benefits between scholars and
fellows, fewer fellows rank the medical coverage
offered through GPA as being unsatisfactory when
compared with scholars. However, a similar
percentage of fellows and scholars report that
they find the dental coverage offered through GPA
as being unsatisfactory.
58
Question 51. Have you experienced difficulty in
seeing a doctor or dentist because your insurance
logistics were not in place as of January 1, 2008
or at the beginning of your appointment?
59
Comments for Question 51. Have you experienced
difficulty in seeing a doctor or dentist because
your insurance logistics were not in place as of
January 1, 2008 or at the beginning of your
appointment?
  • Comments
  • I had an issue with my prescription b/c of the
    insurance change.
  • I didn't receive my insurance cards until one or
    two months later than Jan 1, 2008.
  • my insurance card did not arrive by Jan 1, and I
    had medical emergency on Jan 2.
  • Was put into PCP system of UCHP which was a part
    of earlier insurance by the university and ended
    up in a bill for no treatment as such! Finally
    filed a dispute however I was declined its very
    basis. Still our current insurance is hardly
    known by the University of
  • Garnet Powers did not cover dentist located at U
    of C hospital.
  • Unable to receive dental treatment until
    mid-january 2008 due to delay in enrollment
  • it took almost two months and several phone
    calls and emails to get my insurance card in the
    mail. I still haven't received my dental
    insurance card (I've been here over three months
    now)
  • Once hired, it took a while before we got our
    insurance cards. This was due to the University,
    not to Garnett-Powers.
  • The university of Chicago hospital dentist are
    not covered
  • Delayed making an appointment until officially
    enrolled
  • Was put into PCP system of UCHP
  • Rush affiliates not accepted. Very few doctors
    with UofC affiliation are not taking new
    patients.
  • Doctor needed to call to get coverage
    verification also had to get reimbursed for
    dental
  • do not know doctors on the insuranced list
  • We have not received medical cards yet it's
    been over 2 months

60
Question 52. If you were enrolled in the
University-sponsored benefits plan prior to
Garnett-Powers (pre-January 1, 2008), how does
Garnett-Powers compare?
Of the people who were enrolled under the
previous coverage options and have experienced
Garnett Powers, 1/2 of them think that
Garnett-Powers is worse, 1/4 think they are
better and 1/4 think they are neither better nor
worse
61
Question 52. If you were enrolled in a
University-sponsored benefits plan prior to
Garnett-Powers (pre-January 1, 2008), how does
Garnett-Powers compare?
Again, fewer fellows report that GPA is worse
than the previous coverage options available to
them when compared with scholars.
62
List of physicians / dentists and problems
  • 40 of postdocs are not satisfied with the lists
    of physicians and dentists
  • only 30 of postdocs find the cost of the plan
    appropriate

63
Question 54. Have you encountered any problems
associated with coverage from GPA?
  • dental visit seemed to cost more out of pocket
    than was advertised by GPA
  • Additional expenses
  • I prefer not to say.
  • copays
  • The prescription plan is inadequate. DCAM-peds
    does not take this insurance. The dental coverage
    is non-existent in hyde park.
  • The plan didn't pay according to the policy they
    supplied and the actual coverage is far below
    than what they agreed to.
  • i have never been able to resolve anything with
    GPA -- always had to go through insurance myself.
    IN my opinion, GPA does nothing other than
    collecting money.
  • Every time contacting them after visiting
    doctors
  • Dental cleaning fee. Should be increased a bit.

64
Comments for Question 54. Have you encountered
any problems associated with coverage from GPA?
  • Unclear coverage, doctor lists unclear and
    misrepresent the doctors
  • delay in appointment availability
  • I had to pay 250 for a standard gynecology
    visit at the University of Chicago medical center
  • Garnet Powers did not cover dentist located at U
    of C hospital. U of C hospital did not tell me
    that they do not take Garnet Powers dental HMO.
  • Upon hire, initial time until we got our
    insurance cards was long.
  • I submitted my enrollment form 3-4 weeks
    ago.Still not received my card.
  • I had to call them to pay bills completely.
  • For all the appointments at the U of C
    hospitals, including routine exams, the
    deductible applies. Ther REAL cost for coverage
    is price/month 250/year, if we want to have
    access to the U of C Hospitals (a big advantage
    for busy postdocs!).
  • they only cover part of my prescription medicine
  • Went to an in-network doctor that apparently
    uses an out of network lab to run tests received
    large bill for blood tests despite going to an
    in-network doctor... UHC says it's my
    responsibility to check what lab they use, and
    whether the lab is in-network.
  • Meeting of deductibles
  • a high deduction rate (200/person)
  • I was billed 800 for a routine diagnostic blood
    test and on taking it up with Garnett-Powers it
    was reduced to 250 (deductable). I had never
    been charged for similar tests when I had UCHP
    earlier.
  • billing of UofC visits is out-patient, thereby
    cost out-of-pocket
  • it's hard to find a physician in hyde park
  • doctors at UoC hospital won't see you need to go
    to satellite clinics
  • 1) 250 Dollars deductable when visiting a
    provider situated in the hospital. 2) billing
    issues that have so far been resolved, though.
  • dental treatment
  • can not find primary doctor in Hyde Park

65
Q56. From where do you obtain health insurance
coverage? (question for eople who do not have
insurance coverage through Garnett-Powers)
66
Q57. For what reason(s) did you choose not to
obtain coverage from Garnett-Powers (please check
all that apply)?
67
Question 58. Please indicate in which of the
following benefits offered by the University you
are enrolled?
68
Question 59. How much vacation time have you
taken in the last year?
69
Q60. If you are a fellow, do you feel that the
supplemental stipend sufficiently compensates for
the loss of benefits you would otherwise receive
as a scholar?
  • no tuition benefit, no taxes taken out, and
    supplemental stipend would not be enough to cover
    dependents - all while the U sits on my 138,000,
    earning interest
  • supp stipend should be higher
  • The difference in the cost of benefits is HUGE
    -- I cannot afford medical care through
    Garnet-Powers as a PDF, but it would be very
    affordable if I was a PDS
  • 133 dollars does not cover the pre-tax
    incentives to a wageworks program, or vision
    plan, and after all of that, leaves almost
    nothing for ADD or life.
  • When I was a fellow, I was unaware of the
    supplemental stipend.
  • The supplement does not make up for bing
    enrolled in the retirement plan, but it is still
    appreciated.
  • The difference is so big that the supplemental
    stipend does not compensate the difference
  • I was a fellow in between, and at the time I did
    not thing that I was sufficiently compensated
  • I feel as though the benefits given to
    postdoctoral scholars was reduced (in comparison
    to my postdoc appointment at a different
    University) in order to put scholars and fellows
    on even ground. Why weren't benefits for fellows
    increased to what scholars were getting? Also
    - I was told I didn't qualify for any retirement
    benefits until after 1 year, otherwise I would
    have enrolled (re question 1 above)
  • Postdocs that need family coverage are ROYALLY
    SCREWED BY THIS POLICY. Nobody that I talked to
    about this could give me a satisfactory
    explanation. Heck, I imagine that I've talked to
    whoever is reading this. If YOU can make a
    change, I BEG YOU! I know that postdoc is a
    training position, but you shouldn't have to make
    a choice between 12K family coverage (as a
    fellow) and other essentials of life.
  • Stipend covers insurance, but not retirement
    match.
  • it does help, but does not compensate for all
    additional costs that are higher with a dependent.

70
Question 61. Have you attended any of the monthly
postdoctoral information sessions?
71
Question 62. Based on your experience attending a
postdoctoral information session, please indicate
whether or not you agree with the following
statements
72
Web site?
73
BSD Postdoctoral Association Seminars
Even if most of the respondents did not attend
most of the meetings, they showed interest in
attending more
Most of the respondents have attended zero to
five seminars in the last year.
74
BSD Postdoctoral Association Seminars
It seems that the biggest reason for the lack of
attendance to the seminars is due to the
compromise with lab work.
Overall, the respondents have a big interest for
all the topics of the seminars, although
Financial Management seems to be slightly more
important
75
Personal information
  • The postdoctoral population is mostly composed of
    men (55.9) than women (44.1), and the results
    are similar as in the 2007 survey (54 to 46).
  • The age of the majority of the postdocts is
    between 30 and 34, the same as last year. This
    may suggest that the rate of turn over is the
    same. Compare to the 2006?

76
Personal information
  • Most of the postdocs are scholars, in a similar
    percentage as in 2007.
  • Most of the postdocs are American, and from the
    non-American the biggest group carry the J-1
    visa. There is a steep decrease in those who are
    holding H1-B visas.

77
Personal information
The biggest group of postdocs are American,
followed by Chinese and Indian. Canadians (not
presented in this graph) are 3.3 of the
population, as much as Japan.
Among the non-American postdocs, the biggest
percentage has been in the USA for less than two
years. The same was observed in the 2007 survey.
78
Most of the postdocs earned their PhD in the last
two years (63.9).
Half of the postdocs earned their PhD in the USA.
This is an increase in the number of
American-earned PhDs compared to 2007.
79
How many positions/ how many years?
The vast majority of postdocs are in their first
postdoctoral position (78.9), with 17.8 of
postdocs in their second position. A very small
percentage is currently on their third or
more postdocs (3.3). This is an increase in the
percentage of the first postdocs compared to 2007
survey (71).
The majority of the postdocs have been at the
University of Chicago for less than two years,
consistent with the findings that the majority of
postdocs are in their first position and received
their PhD within the past two years.
80
In which department are you? (n52)
The department of Medicine has the highest
representation (18.4), closely followed by
Biochemistry Molecular Biology (13.8). Other
highly represented departments are Human Genetics
(9.9), Molecular Genetics (9.2) and Pathology
(7.2)
81
Comments
  • the issue of fellow v. scholar must be resolved.
    Normalization of insurance benefits is a good
    start, but why must I continue to be penalized
    for bringing money in to the University. It
    absolutely boggles my mind. They are really
    taking advantage of a situation here.
  • The current situation for PDFs benefits is
    horrific. There is no way a PDF can afford
    medical insurance through Garnet-Powers. The
    should get the same offer as post-doctoral
    scholars. As it is right not there is a huge
    financial disincentive for accepting a
    post-doctoral fellowship, especially for
    post-docs with families.
  • I am disappointed with the handling of my
    undergrad loan. I am unclear as to why U of C
    postdocs have to take a forbearance instead of a
    deferment. If I were a postdoc at Stanford, my
    loan would be deferred no problem. Is it a
    classification of postdocs at the U of C then? Do
    other non-research one institutions have the same
    problem? Why? Also, I don't understand why
    sometimes postdocs are classified as students,
    and other times classified as faculty or staff. I
    think a common status needs to be established,
    and the university needs to adopt it. That way
    EAHP, the gym, Lab schools, etc. would have to
    make criteria for all postdocs equally.
  • In addition to the (typically offered) late
    afternoon social events, these events should also
    take place later in the evening (including
    off-campus locations such as a pub).
  • Postdoc hockey night at United Center would be
    cool.
  • BSD-Post doc website could contain a section for
    postdoc websites
  • If I wanted to connect with other postdocs from
    my country of citizenship, it would be nice if
    there were some way to do this effectively. Maybe
    through the website?
  • What is the mechanism to ensure that postdocs
    are PAID FOR to go to conferences? what is the
    mechanism to ensure that postdocs get a stipend
    increase each year?
  • I strongly suggest that the University of
    Chicago change our insurance plan to be the
    original UCHP. Otherwise, I may consider to buy
    insurance from other company rather than the
    Garnett-Power. I don't think their services are
    good.
  • The distinction between a Fellow and a Scholar
    in terms of benefits is unacceptable. It is
    outrageous that individuals who help bring
    financial support from outside the University and
    contribute to its research community are not even
    considered employees and are instead punished by
    low quality benefits and higher insurance cost.

82
Comments (continued)
  • The benefits for postdoctoral scholars are
    completely unsatisfactory. No where in the
    definition of a postdoctoral scholar does it
    state that postdoctoral scholars are not academic
    employees. Postdoctoral fellows are clearly not
    employees, which is clearly stated. However,
    benefits listed on the University of Chicago
    Human Resources web page for academic employees
    do not apply to postdoctoral scholars, who are
    considered temporary (contractual) employees. As
    such, retirement benefits are now sub-par. This
    should be made clear on the Guidelines for
    Postdoctoral Fellows. I would not have accepted
    a position at this University if I had known that
    retirement benefits were so poor, as I believe
    that any position requiring a PhD should receive
    retirement benefits from the first day of work
    (not after being employed for a year).
  • As I have only been here for 2 months some
    questions are not applicable for me. Maybe the
    amount of time as a postdoctoral fellow at the
    University could be indicated in more detail.
  • I am very much frustrated with my mentor and I
    will get a new position in a few days. There
    should be a monitoring of the PIs that do not
    take care of their postdocs.
  • I wonder the number of post-docs that are
    "delaying" the possibility of having a child due
    to salary restrictions and (lack of) childcare
    support at U of C. That is certainly my case.
  • It is nice that PDA always organize such an
    annual survey.
  • I am not happy with the career path offered to
    me by my supervisor. Having been a postdoc for 5
    years (the limit at the time for the U of C) I
    was offered no alternative post but to take the
    position of Senior Research Technologist, a
    position I am well over qualified for. I was
    offered this or leave by my supervisor, something
    I simply could not do as I needed my papers.
    There is no system in place at the university
    which prevents this from happening and it is
    disgraceful. This has happened to 3 people in my
    lab and nothing can be done about it as we are
    all small fish in a big pond and do not have the
    ability to argue against this blatant misuse of
    power.
  • The biggest issues I see as a post-doc are the
    discrepancies between post-doc scholars and
    fellows in terms of insurance costs and benefits.
    I recently took a maternity leave and at that
    time encountered many issues with respect to the
    policies and how they address leaves. For a
    population of employees of child-bearing age, the
    policies were horribly inadequate and left me
    with zero protection. Thankfully my advisor
    chose to handle things in a more than generous
    fashion, but the University left me extremely
    exposed.
  • I feel like the PDA was the anchor for my
    postdoctoral training at U of C. The most
    valuable lessons I had while there came from PDA
    seminars and contacts, reflections, and
    exploration that I initiated as a direct result
    of being involved with PDA activities.
  • Need more seminars and social activities for
    postdoc
About PowerShow.com