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Find someone you dont know and share one success and what evidence tells you it is a success

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Find someone you dont know and share one success and what evidence tells you it is a success – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Find someone you dont know and share one success and what evidence tells you it is a success


1
Find someone you dont know and share one success
and what evidence tells you it is a success?
2
Survey Results
  • A sleeping giant is rising!
  • Move outside the walls!
  • Broke the ice!
  • Just do it!

3
Successes!!!!!
  • Enhanced perception of what we do 8
  • CC and extension working together - 3
  • Networking 8
  • Strategic plan 7
  • Economic development -14
  • Workforce development - 15
  • Civic engagement 2
  • Meet the needs of the people - 3

4
Challenges!!!!
  • Internal challenges 27
  • Time, logistics, funding, communication,
    staffing, presidents role,
  • Sustainability 16
  • Economic development 5
  • CC and extension working together 3
  • Civic engagement 18
  • Stakeholders, culture of deficit
  • TURF - 2
  • We have increased the demand

5
Community colleges and community
  • Civic engagement 47
  • Change in culture, inclusion, stakeholders
  • Bright future 37
  • Strategic plan 2
  • Economic development 8
  • AI
  • High schools

6
Community college and LGUs
  • Resources and sustainability 4
  • Change in culture
  • Very successful, critical to success
  • Partnerships evolving 7, improving 8
  • Share projects 5
  • Personalities
  • No more negativity
  • Limited potential
  • Non existent

7
Evaluation
  • Need to find a measure 6
  • Dont have any 8
  • Things we are using KASA, formative, paper
    trail
  • Issues wasnt built in, staffing turnover
  • Proof of the pudding is in the eating of it!

8
Evaluation Processes
  • None 6
  • Improve 1, in process -4
  • Focus groups 4
  • Output measures 6
  • Surveys 5
  • Documentation - 2
  • Benchmarks
  • Pre/post surveys
  • Every program, every service

9
What should we continue to do?
  • Guidance 15
  • Support 7
  • Convene us 7
  • Sustainable development 4
  • Evaluation 2
  • Onsite visits 2
  • Networking 2
  • Keep in touch 2
  • Multi-level partnerships
  • CHEERLEADING

10
Impact
  • Enhanced role of the college 23
  • Good practice 3
  • Economic development 9
  • Increased access to education 3
  • Long ways to go!

11
What we want to tell Ford
  • Value of partnerships 13
  • Civic engagement and community building 3
  • Learning together 2
  • Work with extension - 2
  • Expanding offerings
  • Native learners can have culture and education
  • Struggled
  • AI, high schools, see the potential, resources
    for the project were important

12
Planning for Sustainability
Mary Emery Cornelia Butler Flora North Central
Regional Center for Rural Development
memery_at_iastate.edu www.ncrcrd.iastate.edu
13
Why do some communities thrive while in the next
county over a similar community struggles to
survive?
14
What the Research Tells Us
  • Heartland Center for Leadership Development 20
    Clues
  • Flora and Flora Entrepreneurial Support
    Infrastructure
  • Flora, Flora and Fey Rural Legacy and Change

15
(pause)
16
Worthy Causes and Community Activities
17
Worthy Causes and Community Activities
18
Built Capital
Financial Capital
Natural Capital
Political Capital
Healthy Ecosystem Vital Economy Social Well-Being
Cultural Capital
Social Capital
Human Capital
19
Capital
  • Resources invested to create new resources over a
    long time horizon

20
Why Focus on the Capitals?
  • Importance of place.
  • Interdependency and interaction.
  • Balance.
  • Ripple effect.

21
Natural Capital
  • Natural capital provides possibilities and limits
    to human action. It influences and is influenced
    by human actions.
  • Air quality, wind and sun
  • Water
  • Soil and minerals
  • Biodiversity
  • Landscape

22
Sustainable, Healthy Ecosystems with Multiple
Community Benefits
  • Human communities plan and act in concert with
    natural systems
  • Ecosystems are used for multiple community
    benefits
  • Those with alternative uses of the ecosystem seek
    common ground

23
Cultural Capital
  • Spirituality
  • Symbols-sense of place
  • Ways of knowing
  • Language-history
  • Ways of acting
  • Definition of what is problematic
  • Cultural capital determines how we see the world,
    what we take for granted, what we value, and what
    things we think possible to change. Hegemony
    allows one social group to impose its symbols and
    reward system on other groups.

24
Local and Traditional Knowledge is Appreciated
and Enhanced
  • Cultural differences are recognized and valued.
  • Traditional knowledge and historical places are
    maintained.
  • Communities are willing to take the time to
    understand and build on different ways of knowing
    and doing.

25
Human Capital
  • Education
  • Skills
  • Health
  • Self-esteem
  • Self-efficacy
  •  The characteristics and potentials of
    individuals that are determined by the
    intersection of nature (genetics) and nurture
    (social interactions and environment).

26
Increased Use of the Knowledge, Skills, and
Abilities of Local People
  • Identify capacities
  • Enhance capacities
  • Recombine capacities

27
Social Capital
  • Interactions among individuals that occur with a
    degree of frequency and comfort. Bonding social
    capital consists of interactions within specific
    groups. Bridging social capital consists of
    interactions among social groups.
  • Mutual trust
  • Reciprocity
  • Groups
  • Collective identity
  • Sense of shared future
  • Working together

28
Social Capital
  • Bonding
  • Tight, exclusive networks
  • Strong distinction between insiders and outsiders
  • Single answer focus
  • Bridging
  • Open and flexible networks
  • Permeable and open boundaries
  • Legitimization of alternatives

29
Dimensions of Social CapitalImplications for
Regional Development
Bridging



Clientalism Regional change driven by goals of
outsiders
Progressive Participation Regional change
driven by community-determined goals

Bonding
-
Strong Boundaries Regions resists change,
often groups within the regions dont trust each
other and do not cooperate
Extreme individualism Rich solve problems
through financial capital Poor have few options
-
30
Improved Regional Initiative, Responsibility, and
Adaptability
  • Shared vision.
  • Building first on internal resources.
  • Looking for alternative ways to respond to
    constant changes.
  • Loss of the victim mentality.
  • Loss of cargo cult mentality.

31
Political Capital
  • Political capital is the ability of a group to
    influence standards, regulations and enforcement
    of those regulations that determine the
    distribution of resources and the ways they are
    used.
  • Organization
  • Connections
  • Voice
  • Power

32
Increased Voice and Influence
  • People who share a vision for a sustainable
    future are organized and work together.
  • They know and feel comfortable around powerful
    people as well as those often excluded.
  • They make sustainability part of the political
    agenda.

33
Financial Capital
Forms of currency used to increase capacity of
the unit that accesses it. Financial capital is
often privileged because it is easy to measure,
and there is a tendency to put other capitals
into financial capital terms.
  • Savings
  • Debt capital
  • Investment capital
  • Tax revenue
  • Tax abatements
  • Grants
  • Gifts
  •  
  •  
  •  

34
Appropriately Diverse and Healthy Regional Economy
  • Reduced poverty
  • Increased efficiency
  • Increased economic diversity
  • Increased assets of those who live in the region

35
Built Capital
  • Human-constructed infrastructure used as tools
    for production of other capitals.
  • Sewers and water systems
  • Buildings
  • Machinery
  • Roads
  • Electronic communication

36
Physical Infrastructure that Enhances Other
Community Capitals.
  • Serves multiple users.
  • Is locally maintained and improved.
  • Links local people together equitably.
  • Connects local people, institutions and
    businesses to the outside.

37
 
Impact on one capital can lead to changes that
spiral up or down across the capitals decreasing
or increasing the related assets.
38
Spiraling of Capital Assets
Loss of jobs.
Decline in population.
Spiraling down
Decline in per capital income.
Loss of generational wealth transfer.
39
Spiraling of Capital Assets
Philanthropy provides ongoing funding.
Cultural capital increases.
Spiraling up
Work on involving youth, supporting
entrepreneurship, capturing 10 of wealth
transfer.
Bridging social capital brings outside expertise
together with internal wisdom.
40
Think Globally, Act Locally, Collaborate
Regionally
41
Using the capitals to map system change
  • What do people do differently as a result of your
    program?
  • Who benefits from these changes?
  • How do systems, institutions, organizations
    change?

42
Indicators of Success
  • Review your map and identify areas where people
    are already collecting information
  • Identify those areas where measurement is very
    important to the project what indicators will
    help you measure success?
  • Who will collect the information, how?

43
Sustainability Tasks
  • Vision to guide us
  • Results orientated
  • Strategic financing
  • Broad-based community support
  • Identify champions
  • Organize for adaptability to changing conditions
  • Strong internal systems
  • Sustainability plan
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