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Child Poverty in Africa Third International Policy Conference on the African Child Addis Ababa, Ethi

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The African Child Policy Forum. May 12-13, 2008. Definition of child poverty ... children in Djibouti and Central African Republic are living with a disability. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Child Poverty in Africa Third International Policy Conference on the African Child Addis Ababa, Ethi


1
Child Poverty in AfricaThird International
Policy Conference on the African ChildAddis
Ababa, Ethiopia
  • David Mugawe
  • Deputy Executive Director
  • The African Child Policy Forum
  • May 12-13, 2008

2
Definition of child poverty
  • A definition of child poverty adopted by the UN
    General Assembly makes an important
    acknowledgment of the fact that while poverty
    harms everyone, children experience poverty
    differently.

3
Definition of child poverty
  • Children living in poverty are deprived of
    nutrition, water and sanitation facilities,
    access to basic health-care services, shelter,
    education, participation and protection, and that
    while a severe lack of goods and services hurts
    every human being, it is most threatening and
    harmful to children, leaving them unable to enjoy
    their rights, to reach their full potential and
    to participate as full members of the society.

4
  • Children live in families, so discussion of
    child poverty needs to consider household
    conditions.
  • However children do not necessarily experience
    poverty in the same way as other family members.
    Since data on child poverty is often captured at
    a household level, it masks intra-household
    differences.

5
  • A childs survival and wellbeing is crucially
    linked with that of its mother.
  • Mothers are particularly mediators of child
    poverty. As part of their role as poverty
    managers, mothers frequently act as shock
    absorbers, shielding their children (and
    sometimes partners) from the full impact of the
    inadequate financial resources at their command.
    This can mean mothers going without food,
    clothing and warmth.

6
  • There are stark regional differences, for
    instance, between the Maghrib and sub-Saharan
    states in the level of inequality.
  • The north is more economically developed with
    much stronger infrastructure and consequent
    social conditions.
  • The population in the north is older population
    growth rate typically lower income inequality
    looks less the rate of absolute poverty
    considerably lower child mortality is much less
    common and primary school enrolment rates higher.

7
Children paying the price of poverty
  • The proportion of people living in extreme
    poverty in sub-Saharan Africa was 41.4 per cent
    in 2007, of which, the majority are children.
  • Sub-Saharan Africa is home to three quarters (121
    million) of the worlds extremely poor people
    living below 50 US cents a day, again most of
    whom are children.

8
Children paying the price of poverty
  • The proportion of people living in extreme
    poverty in sub-Saharan Africa was 41.4 per cent
    in 2007, of which, the majority are children.
  • Sub-Saharan Africa is home to three quarters (121
    million) of the worlds extremely poor people
    living below 50 US cents a day, again most of
    whom are children.

9
Children paying the price of poverty
  • Nine out of ten children under 15 years of age
    living with HIV in the world live in sub-Saharan
    Africa. Fewer than 10 per cent of these children
    are being reached by basic support services.
  • About 12 million children aged 17 years in
    sub-Saharan Africa were orphaned by AIDS in 2005.

10
Children paying the price of poverty
  • In sub-Saharan Africa, more than one quarter of
    all children under five years old are
    underweight.
  • Only 58 and 36 per cent of the population in
    sub-Saharan Africa have access to safe water and
    adequate sanitation respectively.

11
Children paying the price of poverty
  • Because of war and conflict, Africa accounts for
    the highest percentages of children with
    disabilities. Almost 1 in 3, 2-9 year old
    children in Djibouti and Central African Republic
    are living with a disability.
  • In 2004, more than 38 million children in Africa
    were out of school. The majority of these had
    never been to school at all.

12
Children paying the price of poverty
  • Between 1999 and 2005, the number of children
    entering primary school for the first time grew
    by 36 per cent in sub-Saharan Africa. However, 37
    per cent of these children did not reach the last
    grade of primary education largely due to poverty.

13
Children paying the price of poverty
  • Sub-Saharan Africa has high incidence of child
    labour, with 26.4 per cent of all 5-24 year-olds
    working. In absolute terms, about 49.3 million
    children under 15 years of age were working in
    the region in 2004.
  • The incidence of child poverty is higher among
    families with larger numbers of children.

14
Poverty..
  • robs children of their joy, their childhood and
    their future
  • impairs their lives
  • deprives children of their right to food,
    clothing and shelter
  • denies children access to quality education and
    basic health services

15
Poverty .
  • exposes children to abuse, neglect and
    exploitation
  • hinders children reaching their full potential
  • limits their full participation as full members
    of society
  • takes away they dignity and self esteem

16
Tackling child poverty
  • Recognise child poverty
  • Count the cost of poverty
  • Push for pro-poor economic growth
  • Develop social security systems

17
Tackling child poverty
  • Save childrens lives and improve their
    livelihoods
  • Maximise mothers labour market participation and
    economic freedom
  • Narrow the gaps of the information age
  • Get more reliable data
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