A proposal for an improved laser system for the CEBAF photo-injector. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: A proposal for an improved laser system for the CEBAF photo-injector.


1
A proposal for an improved laser system for the
CEBAF photo-injector.
  • John Hansknecht
  • Electron Gun Group

2
A timeline of laser systems at Jlab
  • Feb 1995. A 5mW He-Ne laser source produced the
    first photo emitted beam at Jlab. The beam was
    DC and the chopper chopped the beam for the
    three halls. There was no tune mode and viewer
    limited mode was achieved by inserting a neutral
    density filter on a pneumatic cylinder to reduce
    laser power.
  • Pros
  • We made polarized beam!
  • Cons
  • Most of the beam produced was thrown away on the
    chopper.
  • Controls were not suited for production beam.

3
1996
  • April 1996. JLab source group, under the
    guidance of Dr. Charles Sinclair, was the first
    in the world to demonstrate high frequency
    polarized synchronous photoinjection from GaAs.
  • The laser driving the gun was state of the art.
    A diode laser was rf gain-switched at 1497 MHz
    and subsequently amplified by a tapered-stripe
    laser diode amplifier 1.
  • The laser provided tune and viewer limited pulse
    structures. These Macro-pulses were
    relatively easy to create electronically and met
    the requirements necessary for all beam
    diagnostics.
  • This laser system was subsequently copied by
    other labs for use on their electron guns.
  • 1 M. Poelker, Appl. Phys. Lett ., 67, 2762
    (1995).

4
The 1996 CEBAF Laser Table
5
1996 Laser Pulse Structure
  • Pros
  • Better photocathode lifetime vs. beam from a
    DC laser.
  • Gain switching was simple.
  • Cons All for One One for All
  • The chopper is still required to intercept beam
    for amplitude control.
  • The current drawn from the photocathode needed
    to be 3 times the current requested by the
    highest current hall.
  • Wavelength not tunable. Diodes and amplifiers
    were only available at two important wavelength
    ranges.

6
1997 Diode Laser system improvements
  • The diode laser system was modified to provide 3
    separate lasers, each pulsed at 499MHz and phased
    120 apart.
  • Space constraints forced the source group to
    design a new compact seeded amplifier.
  • This design change was also needed to provide the
    ability to quickly swap lasers among the two
    wavelength selections.

7
1997 Laser Table schematic
8
Key points for 3 laser operationsBeam combining
methods
http//www.jlab.org/accel/inj_group/laserparts/Bea
m_combining_tutorial.pdf
9
1997 laser table (open in lab)
10
1997 Laser Pulse Structure
  • Beam amplitude is customized for the specific
    halls at the laser rather than at the chopper.
  • Individual hall laser can be shut-off if hall
    does not want beam.
  • Individual Tune and viewer limited modes.
  • Most efficient use of the precious resource of
    electrons. - Longest lifetime of photocathode.

Beam is now being routinely delivered for physics
from Bulk GaAs T-Gun Broken.
11
1997 and 1998
  • New problems introduced
  • ASE (Amplified Spontaneous Emission) is not our
    friend
  • 1. leakage to unintended hall
  • 2. Polarization dilution
  • 3. Tune mode cross-talk
  • Laser powers of individual lasers are
    subsequently dropped to limit ASE.
  • We are laser power limited further than before.
  • Beam coincidence
  • Vendor delivery problems
  • Dripping sweat kills lasers
  • Changes are needed soon

100uA 35 polarization delivered to HAPPEX from
Bulk GaAs
12
1999 brings major changes
  • Vertical Gun replaced with 2 horizontal guns
  • (no more kneeling on the floor for laser
    work)
  • An air-conditioned laser hut (inexpensive plastic
    curtain) is constructed to contain the laser
    table.
  • (no more sweat dripping on the lasers)
  • Safety No more vertical laser beam.
  • Ti-Sapphire lasers are in testing phase. New
    Strained layer photo-cathodes require 10X more
    power than bulk GaAs for same current. We are
    severely power limited.
  • No real changes to lasers other than physical
    layout.

50uA 70 polarization delivered to HAPPEX from
Strained GaAs
13
1999 - Ready for some serious physics now
14
1999 laser table schematic
15
Y2K Introducing the Actively-modelocked
Ti-Sapphire laser (another first)
(C. Hovater and M. Poelker Nuclear Instruments
and Methods in Physics Research A 418 (1998)
280-284) 
Jlab Patented Technology C. Hovater, M. Poelker
16
Y2K- Actively modelocked Ti-Sapphire laser
schematic
Jlab Patented Technology C. Hovater, M. Poelker
17
Y2K laser table schematic
18
Y2K Laser System
  • Pros
  • Ti-Sapphire laser is wavelength tunable to reach
    peak polarization of photo-cathode material
  • Ti-Sapphire laser provides high power as compared
    to diode laser systems - (can deliver more
    Coulombs between cathode activations)
  • Ti-Sapphire laser has no ASE

Nov. 2000. Delivered high current and high
polarization to two halls simultaneously. (GEn
GEp) This would not have been possible without
the new Ti-Sapphire laser.
19
Y2K Laser System
  • Cons
  • Ti-Sapphire lasers are extremely sensitive to
    alignment and cleanliness. 1um changes of cavity
    will affect lock. Small changes in room
    temperature will change alignment of the cavity.
  • The cavity length sets the fundamental repetition
    rate of the cavity. Injection modelocking relies
    on many parameters being perfect to achieve a
    good pulse structure on the output.
  • If laser phase lock is lost, the beam can be sent
    to the wrong hall(s).
  • Phase noise makes e- beam difficult to transport
  • Difficult to produce a Tune structure. Diode
    used colinearity, phase differences and
    amplitude differences caused problems.
  • Laser on-call is a full time job

20
2 Halls from 1 Ti-Sapphire Laser (Nov 2000)
21
2001 Laser System g0 preps
22
2001-2002
  • New technology available- (SESAM technology)
    Commercial Ti-Sapphire laser that provides
    superior reliability and performance over our
    injection-seeded and AOM mode-locked Ti-Sapphire
    lasers.
  • g0 31MHz experiment would not have been
    successful were it not for this laser.
  • Laser was so successful that we purchased several
    for 499MHz as well.
  • Laser table controls upgraded to provide fine
    control for the correction of current and
    position asymmetries.

23
2002 Present Laser Table
24
Enhancements
25
2004- A Safer and Cleaner environment
26
Current Standings
  • Pros
  • The year is 2005. The injector is generally not
    the source of problems for the accelerator.
  • The injector is providing the highest
    polarization, highest current synchronous
    photo-injected beam ever delivered in the world.
  • We are now capable of delivering parity quality
    beam to 3 experiments simultaneously. (sort of)
  • The injector area is Safe, Clean, and Cool
  • A new load-locked gun is coming soon that will
    allow rapid exchange of previously prepared
    photo-cathodes.
  • Cons
  • The source group has lost several key personnel
    and the present budget does not support
    replacement. Innovation improvements now take
    a back seat to maintenance of the existing
    system. Everything takes longer.
  • Although the Time-Bandwidth Products, Inc lasers
    are vastly superior to our previous lasers, they
    are still temperamental and require an expert to
    maintain.

27
Laser Specific issues that need to be addressed
  • Wavelength tunability and time required for
    changes
  • Phase noise phase lock
  • Vendor spares
  • Beam Colinearity
  • Polarization dilution
  • Tune mode quality
  • Parity system quality
  • 1.497 GHz stable laser for Accelerator tuning has
    been requested
  • Laser Power limit
  • Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE)
  • Laser sensitivity to its environment and laser
    safety.
  • Time consumed to replace lasers
  • Only 2 Laser experts in the group.
  • Need to align multiple items on laser table.
  • Confusion to operators when lasers are changed
    and have different performance characteristics.

28
Lets build a new laser system from scratch.
  • Our first point of action is to select a
    wavelength. Our recent success with the
    super-lattice cathodes proves that 780nM is
    ideal for high polarization and excellent QE.
  • We are sticking with this decision and will place
    this cathode material in both guns, so our laser
    system will deliver 780nM light. (scratch 1
    from the list)
  • We liked our gain-switched diode technique
    because of its phase noise and phase lock
    attributes. Lets start with three laser seeds
    and gain switch them. (scratch 2 from the
    list)
  • We will be using lasers and fiber laser
    amplifiers designed for the cable TV and
    communications industry. (scratch 3 from the
    list)
  • We are going to use new fiber laser technologies
    that allow us to combine all lasers in a single
    fiber with identical polarization and collinear
    travel. (scratch 4 and 5 from the list)
  • We will use fiber-based electro-optic modulators
    with GHz bandwidth, so we should be able to
    produce any desired tune mode or other modulation
    on the beam with high quality. (scratch 6 and 7
    from the list)

29
New laser system design. Lets see what we have
so far.
Pre-Amp
Pre-Amp
Pre-Amp
30
More design thoughts
  • Since combining these lasers appear to be so
    easy, lets throw in a fourth laser at 1.497
    GHz. We will use a fiber based MEMS optical
    switch to efficiently swap from the 3 laser
    system (500MHz) to the single 1.497 GHz laser
    with the press of a button.
  • (and scratch 8 from the list)

31
Laser system design continued
Pre-Amp
Pre-Amp
Pre-Amp
Pre-Amp
32
Now we need some Power
  • Thus far our system has four lasers that provide
    clean gain-switched light. We need to amplify it
    further to get sufficient power for operations.
  • Erbium-Ytterbium fiber laser amplifiers are now
    commercially available. Their power level
    capabilities have been growing exponentially over
    the past few years. They will meet our immediate
    demand (for a price), but will become more
    powerful and cheaper as the technology and market
    demand grows.
  • Previous worries about delivering quality
    single-mode TEM00 beam from a fiber are gone.
    New Panda fiber designs transmit pure single
    mode beam without worry.
  • We are specifying an amplifier that should
    triple our present deliverable laser power.
    (scratch 9 from the list)

33
The final pieces of the system
34
The final system operation
  • Light was produced with proper pulse structure,
    intensity control, modulation control.
  • Light from all lasers was amplified and some ASE
    is present in amplified 1560nM light.
  • Non-linear Second Harmonic Generation (SHG)
    crystal is used to frequency double the light
    from 1560nM down to 780nM. Non-linear gain of
    SHG crystal will cut off and not pass the low
    levels of ASE. (scratch 10 from the list)
  • Light for all halls through the SHG crystal is
    linearly polarized and perfectly round. Now we
    can place a LP optic immediately before the
    helicity control Pockels Cell to obtain the
    highest purity polarization possible.
  • All components are designed with quick disconnect
    polarization maintaining fiber connectors. When
    connected there are no laser safety issues except
    for the area of the fiber to air launch to the
    SHG crystal and subsequent beam delivery optics.
    An expert can be anyone with training on the
    system. (scratch the entire list)

35
Final laser system operation continued
  • The commercial fiber lasers, amplifiers and
    modulators often come with monitoring ports
    installed. There will be multiple points within
    the system to verify system operation and laser
    beam quality.
  • We will be producing much more light than is
    needed, so we will now be able to afford placing
    fast photo-diodes and power taps at the output
    for phase feedback monitoring and control
  • The system will consist of 19 rack mounted
    drawers that can easily be interlocked to power
    off when the lid is opened and thus eliminate any
    laser hazard.
  • The main laser system could be remotely located
    (upstairs in the service building) and the main
    delivery fiber can be fed to the tunnel through a
    conduit.
  • Operators will be able to select any laser for
    any hall. There will no longer be any confusion
    over the capabilities of a given laser.

36
System is compact and easy to swap components
37
Possible Pitfalls
  • This is pure RD. To the best of our knowledge
    it has never been done before and may not work
    exactly as planned.
  • Communications laser companies are making big
    from communications users. They have no interest
    in pursuing our little project, but have been
    helpful in offering to sell us components.
  • There is a possibility that our mode of operation
    and PSS/FSD protection could change. Example
    If ASE passes amplifier when a given Hall is in
    Beam Sync, we would need to secure all halls by
    securing the main laser amplifier until the
    chopper slit could be fully inserted. This would
    be very similar to how we used to run the
    thermionic beam.
  • We may find temperature induced phase or mode
    variations in the fiber system that we have never
    experienced before in a free space system.
  • The halls will lose their ability to
    independently move a PZT mirror for their hall.
    It is envisioned that one PZT mirror would serve
    all halls and the 30Hz PZT functions.

38
Laser system wide view
39
Fiber laser launch on table
40
Whats next?
  • Matt Poelker and I will be performing laser
    studies and procuring components.
  • Our group is short staffed and we need another
    PhD. One might consider finding one with
    experience on fiber lasers.
  • We need input as early as possible from anyone
    who has any special needs for the beam. (i.e.
    special modulation schemes) So these can be
    designed into the system.
  • If we want a quality product in the shortest
    amount of time we will need to form a team that
    consists of
  • 1. Electrical engineering support
  • 2. Software support (drivers and screens)
  • 3. EECAD and FAB support
  • 4. Rf Engineering support
  • 5. PSS/MPS system support
    and.

41
One Million Dollars!
  • Actually much less, but we do need the labs
    commitment for funding of the project.

Which we shall call
The Alan Parsons Project
42
Actual cost rough analysis (optical components)
15K to 30K
43
Rough cost analysis
6K
57K
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A proposal for an improved laser system for the CEBAF photo-injector.

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Title: A proposal for an improved laser system for the CEBAF photo-injector.


1
A proposal for an improved laser system for the
CEBAF photo-injector.
  • John Hansknecht
  • Electron Gun Group

2
A timeline of laser systems at Jlab
  • Feb 1995. A 5mW He-Ne laser source produced the
    first photo emitted beam at Jlab. The beam was
    DC and the chopper chopped the beam for the
    three halls. There was no tune mode and viewer
    limited mode was achieved by inserting a neutral
    density filter on a pneumatic cylinder to reduce
    laser power.
  • Pros
  • We made polarized beam!
  • Cons
  • Most of the beam produced was thrown away on the
    chopper.
  • Controls were not suited for production beam.

3
1996
  • April 1996. JLab source group, under the
    guidance of Dr. Charles Sinclair, was the first
    in the world to demonstrate high frequency
    polarized synchronous photoinjection from GaAs.
  • The laser driving the gun was state of the art.
    A diode laser was rf gain-switched at 1497 MHz
    and subsequently amplified by a tapered-stripe
    laser diode amplifier 1.
  • The laser provided tune and viewer limited pulse
    structures. These Macro-pulses were
    relatively easy to create electronically and met
    the requirements necessary for all beam
    diagnostics.
  • This laser system was subsequently copied by
    other labs for use on their electron guns.
  • 1 M. Poelker, Appl. Phys. Lett ., 67, 2762
    (1995).

4
The 1996 CEBAF Laser Table
5
1996 Laser Pulse Structure
  • Pros
  • Better photocathode lifetime vs. beam from a
    DC laser.
  • Gain switching was simple.
  • Cons All for One One for All
  • The chopper is still required to intercept beam
    for amplitude control.
  • The current drawn from the photocathode needed
    to be 3 times the current requested by the
    highest current hall.
  • Wavelength not tunable. Diodes and amplifiers
    were only available at two important wavelength
    ranges.

6
1997 Diode Laser system improvements
  • The diode laser system was modified to provide 3
    separate lasers, each pulsed at 499MHz and phased
    120 apart.
  • Space constraints forced the source group to
    design a new compact seeded amplifier.
  • This design change was also needed to provide the
    ability to quickly swap lasers among the two
    wavelength selections.

7
1997 Laser Table schematic
8
Key points for 3 laser operationsBeam combining
methods
http//www.jlab.org/accel/inj_group/laserparts/Bea
m_combining_tutorial.pdf
9
1997 laser table (open in lab)
10
1997 Laser Pulse Structure
  • Beam amplitude is customized for the specific
    halls at the laser rather than at the chopper.
  • Individual hall laser can be shut-off if hall
    does not want beam.
  • Individual Tune and viewer limited modes.
  • Most efficient use of the precious resource of
    electrons. - Longest lifetime of photocathode.

Beam is now being routinely delivered for physics
from Bulk GaAs T-Gun Broken.
11
1997 and 1998
  • New problems introduced
  • ASE (Amplified Spontaneous Emission) is not our
    friend
  • 1. leakage to unintended hall
  • 2. Polarization dilution
  • 3. Tune mode cross-talk
  • Laser powers of individual lasers are
    subsequently dropped to limit ASE.
  • We are laser power limited further than before.
  • Beam coincidence
  • Vendor delivery problems
  • Dripping sweat kills lasers
  • Changes are needed soon

100uA 35 polarization delivered to HAPPEX from
Bulk GaAs
12
1999 brings major changes
  • Vertical Gun replaced with 2 horizontal guns
  • (no more kneeling on the floor for laser
    work)
  • An air-conditioned laser hut (inexpensive plastic
    curtain) is constructed to contain the laser
    table.
  • (no more sweat dripping on the lasers)
  • Safety No more vertical laser beam.
  • Ti-Sapphire lasers are in testing phase. New
    Strained layer photo-cathodes require 10X more
    power than bulk GaAs for same current. We are
    severely power limited.
  • No real changes to lasers other than physical
    layout.

50uA 70 polarization delivered to HAPPEX from
Strained GaAs
13
1999 - Ready for some serious physics now
14
1999 laser table schematic
15
Y2K Introducing the Actively-modelocked
Ti-Sapphire laser (another first)
(C. Hovater and M. Poelker Nuclear Instruments
and Methods in Physics Research A 418 (1998)
280-284) 
Jlab Patented Technology C. Hovater, M. Poelker
16
Y2K- Actively modelocked Ti-Sapphire laser
schematic
Jlab Patented Technology C. Hovater, M. Poelker
17
Y2K laser table schematic
18
Y2K Laser System
  • Pros
  • Ti-Sapphire laser is wavelength tunable to reach
    peak polarization of photo-cathode material
  • Ti-Sapphire laser provides high power as compared
    to diode laser systems - (can deliver more
    Coulombs between cathode activations)
  • Ti-Sapphire laser has no ASE

Nov. 2000. Delivered high current and high
polarization to two halls simultaneously. (GEn
GEp) This would not have been possible without
the new Ti-Sapphire laser.
19
Y2K Laser System
  • Cons
  • Ti-Sapphire lasers are extremely sensitive to
    alignment and cleanliness. 1um changes of cavity
    will affect lock. Small changes in room
    temperature will change alignment of the cavity.
  • The cavity length sets the fundamental repetition
    rate of the cavity. Injection modelocking relies
    on many parameters being perfect to achieve a
    good pulse structure on the output.
  • If laser phase lock is lost, the beam can be sent
    to the wrong hall(s).
  • Phase noise makes e- beam difficult to transport
  • Difficult to produce a Tune structure. Diode
    used colinearity, phase differences and
    amplitude differences caused problems.
  • Laser on-call is a full time job

20
2 Halls from 1 Ti-Sapphire Laser (Nov 2000)
21
2001 Laser System g0 preps
22
2001-2002
  • New technology available- (SESAM technology)
    Commercial Ti-Sapphire laser that provides
    superior reliability and performance over our
    injection-seeded and AOM mode-locked Ti-Sapphire
    lasers.
  • g0 31MHz experiment would not have been
    successful were it not for this laser.
  • Laser was so successful that we purchased several
    for 499MHz as well.
  • Laser table controls upgraded to provide fine
    control for the correction of current and
    position asymmetries.

23
2002 Present Laser Table
24
Enhancements
25
2004- A Safer and Cleaner environment
26
Current Standings
  • Pros
  • The year is 2005. The injector is generally not
    the source of problems for the accelerator.
  • The injector is providing the highest
    polarization, highest current synchronous
    photo-injected beam ever delivered in the world.
  • We are now capable of delivering parity quality
    beam to 3 experiments simultaneously. (sort of)
  • The injector area is Safe, Clean, and Cool
  • A new load-locked gun is coming soon that will
    allow rapid exchange of previously prepared
    photo-cathodes.
  • Cons
  • The source group has lost several key personnel
    and the present budget does not support
    replacement. Innovation improvements now take
    a back seat to maintenance of the existing
    system. Everything takes longer.
  • Although the Time-Bandwidth Products, Inc lasers
    are vastly superior to our previous lasers, they
    are still temperamental and require an expert to
    maintain.

27
Laser Specific issues that need to be addressed
  • Wavelength tunability and time required for
    changes
  • Phase noise phase lock
  • Vendor spares
  • Beam Colinearity
  • Polarization dilution
  • Tune mode quality
  • Parity system quality
  • 1.497 GHz stable laser for Accelerator tuning has
    been requested
  • Laser Power limit
  • Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE)
  • Laser sensitivity to its environment and laser
    safety.
  • Time consumed to replace lasers
  • Only 2 Laser experts in the group.
  • Need to align multiple items on laser table.
  • Confusion to operators when lasers are changed
    and have different performance characteristics.

28
Lets build a new laser system from scratch.
  • Our first point of action is to select a
    wavelength. Our recent success with the
    super-lattice cathodes proves that 780nM is
    ideal for high polarization and excellent QE.
  • We are sticking with this decision and will place
    this cathode material in both guns, so our laser
    system will deliver 780nM light. (scratch 1
    from the list)
  • We liked our gain-switched diode technique
    because of its phase noise and phase lock
    attributes. Lets start with three laser seeds
    and gain switch them. (scratch 2 from the
    list)
  • We will be using lasers and fiber laser
    amplifiers designed for the cable TV and
    communications industry. (scratch 3 from the
    list)
  • We are going to use new fiber laser technologies
    that allow us to combine all lasers in a single
    fiber with identical polarization and collinear
    travel. (scratch 4 and 5 from the list)
  • We will use fiber-based electro-optic modulators
    with GHz bandwidth, so we should be able to
    produce any desired tune mode or other modulation
    on the beam with high quality. (scratch 6 and 7
    from the list)

29
New laser system design. Lets see what we have
so far.
Pre-Amp
Pre-Amp
Pre-Amp
30
More design thoughts
  • Since combining these lasers appear to be so
    easy, lets throw in a fourth laser at 1.497
    GHz. We will use a fiber based MEMS optical
    switch to efficiently swap from the 3 laser
    system (500MHz) to the single 1.497 GHz laser
    with the press of a button.
  • (and scratch 8 from the list)

31
Laser system design continued
Pre-Amp
Pre-Amp
Pre-Amp
Pre-Amp
32
Now we need some Power
  • Thus far our system has four lasers that provide
    clean gain-switched light. We need to amplify it
    further to get sufficient power for operations.
  • Erbium-Ytterbium fiber laser amplifiers are now
    commercially available. Their power level
    capabilities have been growing exponentially over
    the past few years. They will meet our immediate
    demand (for a price), but will become more
    powerful and cheaper as the technology and market
    demand grows.
  • Previous worries about delivering quality
    single-mode TEM00 beam from a fiber are gone.
    New Panda fiber designs transmit pure single
    mode beam without worry.
  • We are specifying an amplifier that should
    triple our present deliverable laser power.
    (scratch 9 from the list)

33
The final pieces of the system
34
The final system operation
  • Light was produced with proper pulse structure,
    intensity control, modulation control.
  • Light from all lasers was amplified and some ASE
    is present in amplified 1560nM light.
  • Non-linear Second Harmonic Generation (SHG)
    crystal is used to frequency double the light
    from 1560nM down to 780nM. Non-linear gain of
    SHG crystal will cut off and not pass the low
    levels of ASE. (scratch 10 from the list)
  • Light for all halls through the SHG crystal is
    linearly polarized and perfectly round. Now we
    can place a LP optic immediately before the
    helicity control Pockels Cell to obtain the
    highest purity polarization possible.
  • All components are designed with quick disconnect
    polarization maintaining fiber connectors. When
    connected there are no laser safety issues except
    for the area of the fiber to air launch to the
    SHG crystal and subsequent beam delivery optics.
    An expert can be anyone with training on the
    system. (scratch the entire list)

35
Final laser system operation continued
  • The commercial fiber lasers, amplifiers and
    modulators often come with monitoring ports
    installed. There will be multiple points within
    the system to verify system operation and laser
    beam quality.
  • We will be producing much more light than is
    needed, so we will now be able to afford placing
    fast photo-diodes and power taps at the output
    for phase feedback monitoring and control
  • The system will consist of 19 rack mounted
    drawers that can easily be interlocked to power
    off when the lid is opened and thus eliminate any
    laser hazard.
  • The main laser system could be remotely located
    (upstairs in the service building) and the main
    delivery fiber can be fed to the tunnel through a
    conduit.
  • Operators will be able to select any laser for
    any hall. There will no longer be any confusion
    over the capabilities of a given laser.

36
System is compact and easy to swap components
37
Possible Pitfalls
  • This is pure RD. To the best of our knowledge
    it has never been done before and may not work
    exactly as planned.
  • Communications laser companies are making big
    from communications users. They have no interest
    in pursuing our little project, but have been
    helpful in offering to sell us components.
  • There is a possibility that our mode of operation
    and PSS/FSD protection could change. Example
    If ASE passes amplifier when a given Hall is in
    Beam Sync, we would need to secure all halls by
    securing the main laser amplifier until the
    chopper slit could be fully inserted. This would
    be very similar to how we used to run the
    thermionic beam.
  • We may find temperature induced phase or mode
    variations in the fiber system that we have never
    experienced before in a free space system.
  • The halls will lose their ability to
    independently move a PZT mirror for their hall.
    It is envisioned that one PZT mirror would serve
    all halls and the 30Hz PZT functions.

38
Laser system wide view
39
Fiber laser launch on table
40
Whats next?
  • Matt Poelker and I will be performing laser
    studies and procuring components.
  • Our group is short staffed and we need another
    PhD. One might consider finding one with
    experience on fiber lasers.
  • We need input as early as possible from anyone
    who has any special needs for the beam. (i.e.
    special modulation schemes) So these can be
    designed into the system.
  • If we want a quality product in the shortest
    amount of time we will need to form a team that
    consists of
  • 1. Electrical engineering support
  • 2. Software support (drivers and screens)
  • 3. EECAD and FAB support
  • 4. Rf Engineering support
  • 5. PSS/MPS system support
    and.

41
One Million Dollars!
  • Actually much less, but we do need the labs
    commitment for funding of the project.

Which we shall call
The Alan Parsons Project
42
Actual cost rough analysis (optical components)
15K to 30K
43
Rough cost analysis
6K
57K
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