Concepts and definitions to identify the stock of international migrants: the Canadian case study - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Concepts and definitions to identify the stock of international migrants: the Canadian case study PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 2156df-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Concepts and definitions to identify the stock of international migrants: the Canadian case study

Description:

Landed immigrant status. Landed immigrant. Non-immigrant. Non-permanent ... all landed immigrants from 1980-1999 (tracking for 16 years since first filing tax) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:12
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 22
Provided by: scs145
Learn more at: http://www.unece.org
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Concepts and definitions to identify the stock of international migrants: the Canadian case study


1
Concepts and definitions to identify the stock of
international migrants the Canadian case study
  • Presentation prepared for Joint ECE/Eurostat
    Seminar on migration statistics,
  • Geneva, March 21-23, 2005

2
Outline
  • Definitions and data sources
  • Statistics Canadas Immigration and
    Ethno-cultural Statistics Program
  • Measuring emigration through survey data
  • Statistics from the American Community Survey

Prepared by Kelly Tran and Tina Chui,
Statistics Canada Prepared by Margaret
Michalowski and Doug Norris, Statistics Canada
Kevin Deardorff and Betsy Guzmán, the U.S. Census
Bureau
3
Definitions and Data Sources
  • Statistics Canadas Immigration and
    Ethno-cultural Statistics Program

4
Ways to identify target populations for migrant
statistics the concepts
  • Place of birth
  • Inside Canada
  • Outside Canada
  • Generational status
  • First generation
  • Second generation
  • Third generation and beyond
  • Landed immigrant status
  • Landed immigrant
  • Non-immigrant
  • Non-permanent resident
  • Citizenship
  • Canadian citizen by birth
  • Canadian citizen by naturalization
  • Not a Canadian citizen

5
What the Census can tell us Stock data
  • Size origins of the immigrant population,
    children of immigrants, citizenship profile and
    ethnic groups
  • Settlement mobility patterns of immigrants over
    time
  • Socio-economic experience of immigrants, adult
    children of immigrants as reflected by
    generational status, visible minorities, ethnic
    groups, citizens

6
Immigrants to Canada are increasingly from Asia
and the Middle East
Source Statistics Canada, 2001 Census
7
About 10 of Non-permanent residents were born in
the United States
Total non-permanent residents 198,645
Source Statistics Canada, 2001 Census
8
Proportion of first and second generation
increased in 2001
population aged 15 and over by generational
status
Source Statistics Canada, 1971 and 2001 Censuses
9
The majority of eligible immigrants are Canadian
citizens naturalization rates varied by length
of time lived in Canada
Naturalization rates of immigrants by period of
immigration
Source Statistics Canada, 2001 Census
10
What is the IMDB?
  • Administrative database of linked immigration
    files with taxation files
  • Designed to address the need for detailed,
    policy-relevant data on the immigration program
  • Supported by a federal-provincial consortium, led
    by the department of Citizenship Immigration
    Canada (CIC)
  • Longitudinal updated annually
  • all landed immigrants from 1980-1999 (tracking
    for 16 years since first filing tax)
  • tax data from 1980-2000

11
What is the LSIC?
  • A longitudinal survey designed to study how new
    immigrants adjust to life in Canada during the
    initial years
  • The same immigrants are tracked during the first
    4 years of their settlement in Canada to examine
    which factors help or hinder their adjustment
  • Survey content includes information on many
    aspects of the adjustment process including
    employment, education, health, housing all from
    the immigrants perspective

12
What is the EDS?
  • A survey designed to better understand the ethnic
    cultural backgrounds of people in Canada and
    how these backgrounds relate to their lives today
  • A post-censal survey using the 2001 Census as a
    frame for respondent selection
  • Survey content includes questions on the complex
    dimensions of ethnic identification, ethnic
    ancestry, sense of belonging, interaction with
    society and civic participation

13
Conclusion
  • Different concepts capture different populations
    of interest
  • Related concepts are useful for a comprehensive
    look at the immigrant population
  • More detailed information is also available from
    other data sources
  • Continually working towards internationally
    agreed upon or accepted terminology

14
Measuring emigration through survey data
  • The American Community Survey as a case study for
    Canada

15
National data exchanges as a way to improve
emigration statistics
  • Lack of data on emigration a major challenge
  • Work of the North American Migration Working
    Group
  • The U.S. Census and the American Community Survey
    as sources of statistics on Canadian emigrants

16
Looking at American immigrants from the Canadian
perspective stock data
17
Using different concepts to define immigrants
flows to the United States
18
Advantages of using outside the country
residence sending country perspective
  • More complete coverage of flows originated in the
    sending country
  • Possibility of distinguishing between emigration
    of country-born persons and emigration of
    countrys immigrants

19
Since 2000, emigration from Canada to the United
States has been decreasing
American Community Survey estimates
20
and participation of non-Canadian born
residents of Canada was the main reason behind
the decrease
American Community Survey estimates
21
Conclusions
  • There are a number of feasible methods to obtain
    information on emigration from population
    censuses
  • Cross-tabulating information on residence outside
    the country x years ago and place of birth could
    be the most beneficial to produce statistics
  • Usefulness of sharing data across countries
    relies upon the understanding of underlying
    concepts/terminology
About PowerShow.com