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Title: Installation Master Planning An Overview of the Armys Master Planning Process Army Session


1
Installation Master Planning An Overview of the
ArmysMaster Planning ProcessArmy Session
Federal Planning Division APA 19 April 2006
Greg Brewer, DAIM-MD, (703) 601-2541, email
Gregory.Brewer _at_ hqda.army.mil Jerry.C.Zekert,
CEMP-DA, (202) 761-7525, email Jerry.C.Zekert _at_
hq02.usace.army.mil
2
Purpose of Presentation
  • Provide an overview of describing Master Planning
    why is it required in managing installations
  • Demonstrate how the Master Plan is a keystone
    document to installation management.
  • Identify installation roles and responsibilities
    for Master Planning
  • Identify Army Planning Tools and support
    resources that help installations improve
    planning effectiveness
  • Identify major installation planning initiatives
    and how the Master Planning process support these
    efforts.

3
Garrison Commander The Installation Steward
Stewardship. the conducting, supervising or
managing of somethingespecially the careful and
responsible management of something entrusted to
ones care
4
Planning Situation
  • Challenges
  • Assumptions
  • Headquarters Emphasis on Master Planning
  • The Installation Master Plan

5
Installation Challenges
Infrastructure Assurance
Infrastructure Assurance
  • Mission Stewardship
  • Mission Requirements
  • Range Training Land
  • Critical Infrastructure
  • Protection

Regional Environmental Impact
  • Environmental
  • Stewardship
  • Natural/ /Cultural Mgt
  • Environmental Mgt
  • Noise
  • Sustainability

Mission Requirements
Out-sourcing Privatization
  • Quality of Life
  • Stewardship
  • Soldier, Civilians and
  • Dependents
  • Working Environment
  • Transportation
  • Recreation
  • Surrounding Community

Surrounding Communities/ Regional Cooperation
6
Army Transforming Over Time
WARFIGHTING ARMY IN THE WAR TO END ALL WARS
FRONTIER ARMY
WARFIGHTING ARMY WW II Korea
COLD WAR ARMY
HEMISPHERIC DEFENSE (ISOLATIONISM)
CONSTABULARY MISSION
ARMY OF EXPANSION
?
7
Interim Facilities for ACIP Stationing
Fort Lewis
Fort Lewis
FY04/05/06 25,500 new soldiers stationed.
Ft Drum
Ft Riley CAB
Ft Riley UEx/SUA
Ft Lee
Ft Carson
Ft Eustis
Ft Knox
Ft Bragg
Ft Irwin
Ft Campbell
LEGEND
Ft Sill
Interim facilities in place. Awaiting MILCON
replacement.
Ft Benning
HAAF
PACIFIC
Ft Bliss
Funding for interim facilities expected 06.
Ft Stewart
Ft Polk
Ft Hood
Fort Wainwright
Interim solution not yet finalized stationing
decisions not final.
Hot seating units in swing space due to
deployments. Need MILCON to happen before peace.
Fort Richardson
Tokyo/Yokohama Akizuki/Kure Zama/Sagamihara
Okinawa
Over 1.3BM invested and 4,000 relocatable
buildings acquired
Betting on MILCON placement to beat stationings
Schofield Barracks
8
Echelons Above Brigades et al Impactsi.e. Costs
of Force Structure changes and stationing
occurring FY06-08
Fort Lewis - 72M
Ft Drum - 80M
FY06 FY08 23,500 more new soldiers
Ft Riley - 32M
Ft Carson 25M
Ft Leavenworth - 3.5M
Ft Leonard Wood - 42M
Ft Knox - 50M
Ft Bragg - 30M
Ft Irwin - 1.6M
Ft Campbell - 7M
Ft Sill - 10M
Hunter Army Airfield - 20M
Ft Benning - 24.5M
PACIFIC
Ft Stewart - 10M
LEGEND
Ft Bliss - 38M
Ft Polk - 7M
Fully funded executing
Fort Wainwright - 30.5M
Ft Hood - 5M
Full funding expected 1st Quarter 06.
Ft Sam Houston - 25.1M
Fort Richardson - 28M
Notes
Full funding expected by 2nd Quarter 06
Tokyo/Yokohama Akizuki/Kure Zama/Sagamihara
Okinawa
Funding expected by end FY06
Rough cost 700M
Scope/cost being developed
Schofield Barracks - 93M
9
MILCON requirements for Operational Army(Modular
Bdes MFAB)
Fort Lewis - 2,332
Ft Drum - 1,015M
65,500 new soldiers by end 2011
Ft Riley Total - 1,026M
Ft Lee - 607M
Ft Carson 1,042M
Ft Leonard Wood 281M
Ft Irwin - TBD
Ft Leavenworth 39M
Ft Knox - 270M
Ft Bragg - 437M
Ft Campbell - 700M
Ft Sill - 55M
Ft Benning - 41M
PACIFIC
Ft Bliss - 1,696M
Ft Stewart/HAAF - 512M
Ft Polk - 7M
Fort Wainwright - 548M
Ft Hood - 205M
MCA estimate 10,261M
Fort Richardson - 547M
Tokyo/Yokohama Akizuki/Kure Zama/Sagamihara
Okinawa
Requirements are based on detailed, boots on the
ground assessment. 7.2M invested in Requirement
Analysis and Planning Charrettes
contracts. Updated 15 March 06. DGL
Schofield Barracks - 1,778M
10
BRAC the Institutional Army Net Gain / Loss by
Installation
West Point 120M/264pn
59,800 new people
Picatinny 47.7M/693pn
Detroit Arsenal 107M/647pn
Aberdeen 877M/2176pn
Rock Island -1263pn
Ft Meade 102M/5361pn
Ft Belvoir 2189M/11,858pn
Ft Leavenworth 129M/203pn
Ft Eustis 137M/98pn
Ft Knox 500M/-944pn
Ft Lee 1,424M/7344pn
Ft Leonard Wood 123M/-87pn
Ft Campbell -351pn
Ft Bragg / Pope AFB 249M/4325pn
Ft Jackson 66M/615pn
Ft Sill 543M/3602pn
Redstone 90M/1655pn
Ft Benning 1,203M/9839pn
PACIFIC
LEGEND
Ft Sam Houston 1,709M/9364pn
Office/Light Industrial
Academic
4,841.9M TABS Estimate 12M Actual cost to
execute
Net loss
Tokyo/Yokohama Akizuki/Kure Zama/Sagamihara
Okinawa
Net gain 1 to 1000
Net gain 1001 to 5,000
Net gain greater than 5,000
11
Net Change of AMF, IGPBS, BRAC
142,000 people restationing
Ft Lewis 9,038
Fort Drum 4,142
West Point 264
Picatinny 693
Detroit Arsenal - 647
Aberdeen 2,176
Rock Island -1,263
Ft Meade 5,361
Ft Belvoir 11,858
Ft Riley 9,300
Ft Eustis 1,168
Ft Leavenworth 203
Ft Carson 9,638
Ft Knox 1,541
Ft Leonard Wood 1,665
Ft Lee 8,375
Ft Bragg / Pope AFB 8,291
Ft Campbell 4,619
Ft Irwin 1,292
Ft Sill 3,334
Ft Jackson 615
Redstone 1,655
Hunter Army Airfield 2,041
Ft Huachuca -336
Ft Benning 10,156
PACIFIC
Ft Hood 6,315
Ft Stewart 1,921
Ft Bliss 18,602
Ft Rucker 1,888
Ft Polk 1,006
Ft Wainwright 2,001
Ft Sam Houston 9399
LEGEND
Ft Richardson 3,652
Net loss
Tokyo/Yokohama Akizuki/Kure Zama/Sagamihara
Okinawa
Net gain 1 to 1000
Net gain 1001 to 5,000
Net gain greater than 5,000
Schofield Bks 3,098
12
BRAC Closures
14 Installations, 9k buildings, 48.8 MSF, 256k
Acres
Umatilla Chemical Depot
USAG Selfridge
Fort Monmouth
Newport Chemical Depot
Deseret Chemical Depot
Fort Monroe
Riverbank AAP
Kansas AAP
Fort McPherson
Fort Gillem
PACIFIC
Mississippi AAP
Lone Star AAP
Legend
HEAVY INDUSTRIAL
Tokyo/Yokohama Akizuki/Kure Zama/Sagamihara
Okinawa
LIGHT INDUSTRIAL
13
Assumptions
Ability to be Innovative Visionary
Available Resources
Flexibility
Known Missions
More Changes
14
Headquarters' Emphasis on Master Planning
  • Garrison Commanders
  • The master plan is the life's blood of the
    installation's future.   
  • You must have the following fundamental pieces of
    this process to be successful
  • Real Property Master Planning.     
  • Installation Strategic Plan. 
  • Executive Planning Board (EPB). 
  • Master planning is not an occasional pursuit it
    is not optional it is a continuous process that
    must be worked skillfully and hard.  It is the
    process that enables proper decisions on the use
    and preservation of our land and infrastructure,
    ensures good stewardship of construction
    resources and builds enduring installations. 

15
INSTALLATION PLANNING FUNDAMENTALS
  • Structure the Force Define the organization,
    manning and equipping.
  • Position the Force Determine where the force
    will be located.
  • Facilitate the Force Provide the real property
    facilities required by the force.
  • Serve the Force Deliver the standard Army
    services.


16
MP Requirements Documents
  • Real Property Master Plan Components
  • Responsibilities
  • Garrison Commander for RPMP
  • Real Property Planning Board
  • Installation (Strategic) Planning Board

17
Army Real Property Master Planning
18
Planning comprehensiveness
Planning Principles Vision Goals Planning Conside
rations
Planning Goals Sustainability Critical
Infrastructure Protection Effective Land
Use Flexible Development- Changing
Missions ..planning principles
19
Area Development Planning approach
Examines a specific area within an installation
which is unified by its function or
architectural area ADP provides an important
link between the RPMP and Site planning for the
individual construction projects. ADP provides a
detailed framework for decisions on Proposals
contained in the Long Range Future Development
Plan (LRC) for functional areas of the
installation
20
Why is an ADP prepared?
A change in mission for a specific portion or
group of facilities Need to focus on a specific
area which will undergo a considerable change
need to resolve specific base problems (e.g.
circulation, conflicts, functional problems,
etc.) Need to prepare a plan for a portion of
the base prior to the completion of the RPMP, if
RPMP has not been updated. Need to address
changes within an area due to downsizing. Need
to meet RP requirements for project funding IAW
with TAB/RPLANS
21
Why is an ADP prepared?
  • Urban Design Issues
  • opportunity to incorporate urban design
    principles into the
  • Facility Planning Process
  • opportunity for urban design considerations for
    Scale, mass,
  • architectural style and landscape features such
    that the
  • TOTAL environment of the area is designed as a
    whole.

22
ADP Product
23
Value of ADP in RPMP
  • The most important characteristics of the ADP
    process include
  • Thorough analysis of physical features of the
    area as well as programmatic requirements.
  • An involvement of the ultimate users of the
    facilities, through early interviews in the
    process.
  • An exploration of multiple alternatives before
    setting on a final plan ensures siting decisions
    based on many points of view.
  • The Final Plan illustrates all siting decisions
    and shows the final form of the Area after all
    project construction is complete
  • An implementation and phasing strategy to
    complement the final Plan and ensure problem-free
    construction

24
Master Planning Policies
AR 210-20, Real Property Master Planning July 2005
  • Anchored on Public Laws and Regulations Connects
    to How the Army Runs
  • Follows Established professional planning tenets
  • Requires comprehensive visionary planning process
  • Linkage to NEPA process
  • Integrated with Army Long-Range Plans
  • Establishes Approval Responsibilities
  • All Installations and Communities must have RPMP
  • Master Planning Instructions/Planning Manual
  • is How To Supplement

25
Master Planning Roles Responsibilities
  • ACSIM
  • Army Master Planning Proponent/ Master Planning
    Policy Procedures
  • OCE/USACE
  • Provide technical Assistance/criteria in
    development of RPMP, and establish and publish
    criteria used during the preparation of RPMP
  • Provide quality, timely and responsive master
    planning support
  • IMA
  • Implement Army RPMP policy and guidance

Master Planning is coordination, cooperation and
communication
26
Installation Roles Responsibilities
  • Garrison Commanders must
  • Ensure the installation Master Plan is prepared
    and maintained.
  • Establish a Real Property Planning Board.
  • Ensure that the RP needs of all installation and
    tenant units and supported activities are known
    and reflected in the RPMP.
  • Ensure all major repair, minor and major
    construction and real estate acquisition/disposal
    activities, regardless of fund source are
    consistent with and included in the approved
    RPMP.
  • Maintain an accurate RP inventory.
  • Ensure the RPMP documents are coordinated with
    intergovernmental agencies and stakeholders.

Master Planning is coordination, cooperation and
communication
27
Installation Real Property Planning Board
  • Members of the planning board
  • Chairman garrison commander
  • Voting members
  • Installation staff engineer (secretary)
  • Chief of each principal or special staff section
    of the installation
  • Commander of each major unit or independent
    activity (including reserve components) occupying
    real estate on the installation
  • Region representative
  • Non voting members
  • Supporting division engineer (USACE)
  • MACOM representative
  • Representatives of adjoining or local military
    installations
  • The Planning Board assists the Garrison Commander
    in the orderly management and development of the
    installation to satisfy all assigned and
    potential future missions

28
Installation Planning Documents
Installation Management Action Plan
Range Training Land Master Plan
Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan
Local Community Development Plans
Information Systems Plan
Physical Security Plan
Housing Master Plans
Environmental Management Plans
29
Garrison Commanders Role
30
Mission
31
Planning Mission
  • Mission To develop a holistic property master
    plan (RPMP) for the short-term, mid-term, and
    long-term development of your installation that
    ensures mission, quality of life, and
    environmental stewardship are achieved.
  • Tasks
  • Conduct Visionary comprehensive Planning
  • Integrate Planning considerations of
    Sustainability CIP AF/PT into planning process

32
Master Planning Process
Conduct Visionary comprehensive Planning requires
Commitment to the planning process grounded on
vision
7. Monitor /Amend Plan
33
Concept of Operation -VISION
  • Defined
  • The unusual capability in discernment or
    perception intelligent foresight. (Source
    Merriam Webster's Dictionary, 2003.)
  • Visioning
  • The act or power in which one sees or conceives
    of something. (Source MerriamWebsters
    Dictionary, 2003.)

34
Considerations in Master Planning
  • VISION
  • Meshing of installations missions and community
    functions
  • Visual Image
  • Sense of Home
  • Sustainability
  • 67 year decisions but adaptable to changing
  • mission requirements
  • Renewable vs. depletion of resources
  • Cost of doing it vs. not doing it
  • AT/FP Critical Infrastructure

35
What Does Vision Look Like?
  • For those who believe that planning always
    fails, and to curb the impatience of others who
    expect planners to solve problems right now,
    good planning sometimes takes time to bear fruit.
    This is so that the long-term quality and
    livability/workability of communities are not
    left to chance.
  • Gene Bunnell, AICP, Author Making Places Special

36
What Is Vision?
  • Do I think architects, planners and
    preservationists can change the world? Yes, I
    do. You can design communities and an culture,
    and not just buildings and spaces.
  • Robert A. Peck, esq., Hon. AIA, Architecture DC
    Magazine, Winter 2003

37
What Does Vision Look Like?
  • Managing and sustaining the development,
    operations, and missions of our installations
    will be impossible without adequate planning, and
    adequate planning takes VISION

38
What Does Army Vision Look Like?
39
Master Planning Considerations
  • To integrate Planning considerations of
    Sustainability CIP-AF/PT into planning process
    requires 1) understanding of factors and 2) a
    comprehensive consideration throughout the
    planning process

7. Monitor /Amend Plan
40
Planning continuum
41
Why Sustainable Development?
  • Ensure the environment will support mission
    accomplishments for the long haul
  • Proactively addresses long-range issues with
    mission impact (pay me now pay me or later)
  • Allows cooperative efforts with community,
    regulators other stakeholders on common issues
    (e.g. urban sprawl, noise, air and water
    pollution, energy use)
  • Demonstrates leadership enhances public
    perception of the military
  • The right thing to do

Installation Sustainability moves us beyond
simply solving todays problems. A sustainable
Army is one that wins todays battles while
laying the foundation for our future success. It
connects today to tomorrow with sound business
and environmental practices Sustainability
enables todays Army to empower the Future
Force. Assistant Secretary of the Army
(Installations Environment) September 2003
42
Sustainable Development
43
Examples of Sustainable Development
44
Sustainable Real Property Master Plan
45
Critical Infrastructure Protection
Know whats are critical assets on your
installation Ensure redundant support provided
46
Critical Infrastructure Protection AT/FP Real
Property Master Plan
47
INSTALLATION PLANNING DOCUMENTS
Installation Management Action Plan
Range Training Land Master Plan
Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan
Local Community Development Plans
Information Systems Plan
Physical Security Plan
Real Property Master Plan
Housing Master Plans
Environmental Management Plans
Keystone to installation integrated
planning Facilitates the Installation Master Plan
48
MASTER PLANNING TOOLS
  • Force File ASIP Defines the Force Structure
  • Army Campaign Plan defines endstate locations.
  • Requirement Analysis Determines facility
    allowances and requirements.
  • Planning Charrettes completes a 1391 for a
    scoped and sited project.
  • Facility Site analysis determines optimal and
    sustainable site.
  • Facility reutilization study determines
    optimal reuse of facilities and OMA projects.
  • Master Planning Technical Manual


49
Planning Tools - Charettes
  • Charettes are simply facilitated problem
    solving sessions that bring together all
    required stake- holders to solve a a problem
  • The process is a established process used by
    the planning, and design profession.
  • Army mandates charettes for
  • Range Training Land Planning Programming
  • Focused MILCON programming (ie. Child Care
    Centers)
  • BRAC/AMF/IGPBS

50
BRAC/AMF/IGPBS Charettes
  • Mandated to solve immediate planning/programming
    requirements
  • Focused on immediate/short-term needs, but
    urgently affects
  • long-term development
  • BRAC/AMC/IGPBS Charettes accomplish the following
    activities
  • Force Structure Review
  • Requirements Analysis Validation
  • Site Investigations / Land Use
  • Site Layout and Planning
  • Preparation of DD Form 1391s

51
BRAC/AMF/IGPBS Charettes
BRAC/AMF/IGPBS Charettes take about 1 month to
complete ACSIM/IMA has directed Centralized
Management of Charette Effort. USACE
Installation Support Center- Huntsville leads
this Effort with close support from
geographic Districts Current ACSIM focus (BRAC05
initiatives) Service Schools (ARMOR/ORDNANCE/ADA
/TRANS) Select units (HRC/HQ FORSCOM/HQ
USARC) Echelons Above Brigade (EAB)
Also, during charette effort, USACE
planning/programming expertise available to
provide SME support as needed
52
Real Property Master Plan Essentials
  • Critical planning document / Land Use
  • Baseline for NEPA and MILCON Program
  • Critical to future Mission Training Capability
  • Expansion Opportunities and Constraints
  • Installation Carrying Capacity
  • Ensure Armys Investment in Future installation
    development

53
Master Planning Essentials to Remember
  • All Master Planning components are essential to
    successful Stationing support
  • Long term installation planning and development
    capabilities must be considered even when
    addressing short term problems requiring
    immediate action
  • Always consider the holistic planning factors
    of land use, sustainability and infrastructure
    assurance during all planning efforts
  • Recommend use of Area Development Plans to look
    at focused long term holistic development

54
Automated Tools
  • Real Property Planning and Analysis System
    (RPLANS)
  • RP allowances/requirements
  • Headquarters Executive Information System
    (HQ-EIS)
  • FYDP, EFRs, ISR, GIS, etc.
  • Integrated Facilities System (IFS)
  • Real Property Inventory (RPI)
  • Army Stationing and Installation Plan (ASIP)
  • Authorized Force Strengths at Installations
  • Installation Status Report (ISR)
  • Installation Facility Quantity and Quality
    Status
  • Geographic Information System (GIS)
  • Integrated Mapping and Tabular (descriptive)
    Data

55
GIS How Do We Bring It Together?
  • GIS Integrates All the Partsto See the Whole!

56
Army GIS Repository GIS-R
Army GIS-R, is the ACSIM GIS portal, available
through AKO, ACSIM web-site Good foundation GIS
information
57
Master Planning Support
  • Planning Support
  • Training/Planning Community of Practice

58
Supplemental Support
  • All members of the Garrison Staff
  • Regional IMA staff
  • MACOM and tenant organizations
  • Other Local planning agencies, colleges and
    universities,
  • American Planning Association www.planning.org

59
Planning Community of PracticeReferences
Documents
  • AR 210-20, Master Planning for Army
    Installations
  • Master Planning Instructions Planning Manual
  • Army Criteria Tracking System
  • Installation Design Guide Criteria Standards
    (IDG)
  • Practical Guide for Compatible Civilian
    Development, Joint Land Use Program, OSD Office
    for Economic Adjustment
  • USACE Master Planning Web site
  • http//www.hq.usace.army.mil/isd/librarie/
    RP/rp.htm

60
Planning Community of Practice Master Planning
Training
  • USACE Prospect Master Planning Course
  • March- June 2006 Norfolk VA2006
  • Future Dec 2006- Portland, Mar 07 Norfolk, June
    Denver
  • USACE Prospect Advanced Master Planning
    (Huntsville AL Jul 2006)
  • Future 2 classes 2-week on installation
  • Installation Management Institute Courses
  • DPW Management Operations Course
  • Installation Planning Professional Certification
    American Planning Association (AICP)
  • APA Conference (April 2006 San Antonio)

Training POC Beverly Carr 256-895-7432
61
Master Planning effectiveness 1 0f 3
In measuring the effectiveness of the Digest as
well as the entire Real Property Master Planning,
installation real property master planning
stakeholders need to ask these questions A good
plan communicates a sense of place and an
understanding of what is special about your
installation and region. It tells a story! What
was the installation like in the past, and what
is it like today? How is the installation
changing, and what will the installation be like
in the future, if present trends continue? What
are the qualities that give the installation a
sense of place and that people value? What are
the forces of change acting on the
installation? A good plan describes alternative
futures and the likely consequences of
alternative courses of action. It reminds
installation commanders, directors soldiers,
civilians, contractors and families that no
outcome is preordained or inevitable the choices
installations make do make a difference. It
expresses a compelling vision of what
installation residents desire the installation to
be like in the future. It expresses an
installations deepest-held aspirations. It
inspires and offers hope.
62
Master Planning effectiveness 2 0f 3
It presents essential data but not too much. It
is not padded with data that is not directly
pertinent to the substance of the plan and
therefore is not so heavy that people are
discouraged from taking it with them the Chain of
Command. All figures, charts, tables, and maps
contained in the plan are included for a reason,
because they shed a light on important issues
addressed in the plan. (Tables, charts, and
graphs presenting interesting but non-essential
data are placed in a separate appendix, rather
than in the main body of the plan.) It puts
forward goals and objectives that are capable of
being translated into specific policies and
actions. It avoids goal statements so general
that they cannot be meaningfully interpreted or
applied in practice. It identifies indicators for
measuring progress toward meeting specific
goals. It is realistic. It does not attempt the
impossible. It does not put forward goals and
objectives without identifying how those goals
and objectives might be achieved. It results from
the process that was used in preparing the
plan. It is fair and equitable and attempts to
balance competing interests.
63
Master Planning effectiveness
It strives to balance development needs against
the need to conserve and protect environmental
resources. Its aim is to achieve a pattern of
land use and development that is sustainable. It
lets design and construction agents know the type
of development the installation wants not just
what the installation does not want and
encourages development in areas most suitable for
development. It encourages people to think about
what is best for the whole installation not
just for their Unit, Organization or for them
individually and about the interests of future
residents as well as those of current
residents. It is packaged and presented in a way
that encourages the installation stakeholders to
want to read it. People care about the places
where they live and work. They want to know what
is happening (and likely to happen) to their
installation. Do not discourage them from seeking
this information by producing a dull or dry plan.

64
A Thing To Remember !!!!
65
QA
66
Points of Contact
Greg Brewer Assistant Chief of Staff for
Installation Management DAIM-MD (703)
601-2541 Gregory.Brewer_at_HQDA.ARMY.MIL
Jerry Zekert HQ, U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers CEMP-DA (202) 761-7525 Jerry.C.Zekert_at_US
ACE.ARMY.MIL
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