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Language Arts and Reading TAKS Overview

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Title: Language Arts and Reading TAKS Overview


1
Language Arts and ReadingTAKS Overview
  • Presented by the HISD English Language Arts
    Department

2
Reading
  • Basic Understanding
  • Literary Elements
  • Use of Strategies
  • Analysis of Text

3
Reading Objectives
3-4-5-6-7-8 9-10-11
1. Word Meaning 2. Supporting Ideas3.
Summarization
1. Basic Understanding
1. Basic Understanding
3. Use of Strategies 4. Analysis/ Critical
Thinking
4. Relationships/ Outcomes5. Inferences/
Generalizations6. POV/ Propaganda/
Fact-Opinion
3. Analysis/ Critical Thinking
2. Literary Elements
2. Literary Elements
4

Features
  • Paired Selections (4-8) Narrative/Expository
  • Triplets (9-12) literary, expository - non
    fiction, visual representation
  • Lengthier passages
  • Higher reading level than TAAS
  • Comparative questions across texts
  • Higher order thinking emphasis
  • Graphic organizers

5
Only at the High School...
  • Lengthier passages - not controlled for
    vocabulary
  • Published pieces (authentic)
  • Multiple choice and open ended questions

6
Grade 4 734 Words RL 6.0 /-
7
A picture is worth...
  • TAAS selection 8th grade
  • TAKS selection 6th grade

639 words RL 6.0 (8)
874 words RL 5.3 (6)
8
(No Transcript)
9
(No Transcript)
10
ELA Grade 11/English III Literary Selection
(Non-fiction)
11
Visual Representation
12
(No Transcript)
13
Writing Grades 4-7-10-11
  • Composition
  • Responses driven by prompt, not purpose
  • Proofreading and Editing
  • Approximately one and one-half pages
  • All skills (CUPS)
  • Multiple choice

14
It Is Time To Revise Our Thinking!
  • Emphasis
  • Authentic Writing
  • Revision and Editing
  • Prompts
  • Assessment Focus ?
  • Instructional Focus

15
Composition Elements
  • Organization/focus
  • Development of Ideas
  • Voice
  • Mechanics
  • Sentence Structure/Variety

16
  • 78 words in the text
  • 3 questions - all variations on one theme

17
89 words in the text
18
  • 261 words in the text (4 Sample)
  • Each selection may cover all 4 objectives

19
General Guidelines
  • Peer-Revision / Peer-Editing
  • Lengthy, Authentic Passages
  • Assumed Vocabulary
  • Conventions Count

20
  • The Best Tool Available
  • Locate the TEA websites splash page
  • www.tea.state.tx.us
  • Click on the button, Texas Assessment Program,
    located under the Curriculum and Assessment
    section
  • in the upper right hand
  • corner of the TEA splash page.
  • www.tea.state.tx.us/student assessment

21
  • Click on TAKS on the Student Assessment web page
    navigation bar. This is a horizontal bar at the
    top of the web page.
  • www.tea.state.tx.us/student assessment/taks/index.
    html
  • Once you reach the TAKS web page , scroll to
    Resources and click on TAKS Information
    Booklets button
  • www.tea.state.tx.us/student assessment/taks/bookle
    ts/index.html

22
Portfolios
  • Reflecting on Writing

23
Portfolio
  • A student writing portfolio is a deliberate
    collection of work that documents depth and
    breadth of student writing.
  • Depth various points of the writing process
    from prewriting through publishing
  • Breadth various products which may include
    stories, brochures, how-to pieces, interviews,
    poems

24
According to NAEP Portfolio Study
  • The use of portfolios to help students collect,
    review, select, and present their work
    accomplishes several goals of the process writing
    curriculum.
  • The use of process strategies has been related
    to the production of higher level writing.
  • Gentile, Claudia A., Martin-Rehrmann, James, and
    Kennedy, John H. Windows into the Classroom
    NAEPs 1992 Portfolio Study. U.S. Department of
    Education, 1995.

25
The 1998 NAEP Writing Report Card
  • Students whose writing was saved in portfolios
    achieved higher scores than their peers who did
    not save their writing.
  • Effective Writing Instruction for All Students.
    TEA/Region IV ESC.

26
Types of Portfolios
  • Think of the artists portfolio.
  • These are usually finished works that display the
    best work of the artist.
  • Imagine portfolios that may be created by
    individuals in these professions
  • hair stylist
  • news reporter
  • architect
  • tattoo artist

27
What might be included in a Writing Portfolio?
  • Prewriting
  • brainstorming lists, graphic organizers,
    interview notes

28
What might be included in a Writing Portfolio?
  • Drafting
  • first through finished drafts

29
What might be included in a Writing Portfolio?
  • Revising
  • copies of
  • revised drafts

30
What might be included in a Writing Portfolio?
  • Editing
  • checklists of skills

31
What might be included in a Writing Portfolio?
  • Publishing
  • finished works, photos of displays, copies of
    publications

32
The Portfolio Process
33
Self-assessment and Decision-makingin the
Portfolio Process
  • Write
  • Make decisions about process and strategies.

34
Self-assessment and Decision-makingin the
Portfolio Process
  • Build
  • Keep writing in a working notebook or folder.

35
Self-assessment and Decision-makingin the
Portfolio Process
  • Decide
  • Establish the
  • purpose of the portfolio.
  • Assess and select pieces with that purpose in
    mind.

36
Self-assessment and Decision-makingin the
Portfolio Process
  • Reflect
  • With teacher guidance, evaluate writing and
    process.
  • Use rubrics, checklists, or open-ended responses.
  • More on reflection later.

37
Self-assessment and Decision-makingin the
Portfolio Process
  • Confer
  • Writing conferences align student goals with
    classroom goals.
  • Teachers can use observations made in conferences
    to inform instruction.
  • Mini-lessons may be part of conference.
  • Allow student to celebrate writing and process.

38
Self-assessment and Decision-makingin the
Portfolio Process
  • Set Goals
  • Goals may be individual and may initiate
    whole-class instruction.
  • Teach strategies to achieve goals.

39
Self-assessment and Decision-makingin the
Portfolio Process
  • Write
  • Writing process and strategies becomes more
    purposeful.

40
Reflection
  • Types of Reflection
  • I chose this because
  • I learned
  • My goals are
  • Next, I want to learn
  • A strategy I used here is
  • I improved
  • I learned this from
  • (Schipper and Rossi, 1997)

41
Reflection
  • Reasons for Selecting a Piece
  • I was able to do something that I could not
    previously do.
  • I used a strategy for the first time.
  • I changed from one strategy to a more effective
    one.
  • I tried real hard.
  • This piece is personally meaningful.
  • This was my best work.
  • (Schipper and Rossi, 1997)

42
Reflection
  • More Types of Reflections
  • What have I done well in a piece of writing?
  • What do I value in writing? (favorite type of
    writing, what makes good writing)
  • What are my goals and interests as a learner and
    developing writer?
  • What are my strategies and processes for writing?
    (also demonstrates students awareness of
    strategies and processes)
  • What am I learning about writing?
  • (Camp and Levine, 1991)

43
Record Keeping
  • Checklists
  • Students keep checklists of skills and record
    what they have worked on or mastered.
  • Strategy Sheets
  • Students keep lists of strategies where they can
    reflect on how they used them in their writing.
  • Teacher Notes
  • When the teacher observes certain writing
    behaviors she can write a note for a student to
    keep in his portfolio.
  • Rubrics
  • Attach rubrics to finished products outlining
    criteria for evaluation and student performance.
  • (Schipper and Rossi, 1997)

44
Record Keeping
  • Conference Notes
  • Record discussion and decisions from writing
    conferences. These may include the following
  • Students reflections
  • Criteria that were met
  • Areas of growth
  • Areas for development
  • Student goals
  • Teachers reflections
  • Teachers goals for the student

45
Whos in Control?
The locus of control over decisions about content
and purpose of a portfolio can fluctuate between
teacher and student.
46
Whos inControl?
  • Benchmark Portfolio
  • Based on a criteria of good writing
  • The student has indicated a sense of awareness of
    audience by addressing opposing opinions.
  • The student has demonstrated the ability to
    extend an interview by asking probing questions.
  • The student has demonstrated growth in using
    adjectives, adverbs and verbs to create more
    vivid descriptions.
  • Used for evaluation informing instruction

(adapted from Jenkins, 1996)
47
Whos inControl?
  • Collaborative
  • Includes both teacher and student choice,
    evaluation, and reflection.
  • Final selections sent home to parents. Remainder
    of portfolio remains in classroom to inform
    goal-setting and instructional decisions.
  • Contributes to cognitive, metacognitive, and
    affective development.

(adapted from Jenkins, 1996)
48
Whos in Control?
  • Showcase
  • Demonstrates student selection, reflection, and
    assessment.
  • Shows best works.
  • Primary purpose is self-assessment and goal
    creation.

(adapted from Jenkins, 1996)
49
Whos inControl?
  • Schipper and Rossi (1997) suggest that using
    portfolios can develop desirable outcomes in
    students
  • Self-awareness
  • Self-evaluation
  • Metacognition
  • Awareness of Process
  • Ownership
  • What impact might locus of control have on these
    outcomes?

50
References
  • Camp, Roberta, and Levine, Denise. Portfolios
    Evolving. In Belanoff, Pat and Dickson, Marcia,
    eds. Portfolios Process and Product. Heinemann,
    1991.
  • Gentile, Claudia A., Martin-Rehrmann, James, and
    Kennedy, John H. Windows into the Classroom
    NAEPs 1992 Portfolio Study. U.S. Department of
    Education, 1995.
  • Jenkins, Carol Brennan. Inside the Writing
    Portfolio What We Need to Know to Assess
    Childrens Writing. Heinemann, 1996.
  • Sommers, Jeffrey. Bringing Practice in Line
    with Theory. In Belanoff, Pat and Dickson,
    Marcia, eds. Portfolios Process and Product.
    Heinemann, 1991.
  • Schipper, Beth and Rossi, Joanne. Portfolios in
    the Classroom Tools for Learning and
    Instruction. Stenhouse, 1997.

51
Writing Conferences
  • Building Better Writers

52
Writing Conferences
  • Writing Conferences are not magic. They are
    structured events. Teachers and students can
    learn and develop the skill of conducting writing
    conferences.

53
Writing Conferences
  • Conferences have a point to them.
  • Conference have a predictable structure.
  • In conferences, we pursue lines of thinking with
    students.
  • Teachers and students have conversational roles
    in conferences.

54
Writing Conferences
  • Writing conferences are not therapy. The focus
    is developing the writer first and the writing
    second.
  • The content of the writing is not as important as
    the process of teaching students strategies and
    techniques more experienced writers use to write
    well.

55
General Structure of a Writing Conference
  • Conversation about the work the child is doing as
    a writer.
  • Conversation about how the child can become a
    better writer.

56
General Structure of a Writing Conference
  • First the student takes the lead

57
General Structure of a Writing Conference
  • Then the teacher takes the lead

58
General Structure of a Writing Conference
  • The teachers role in the first part of the
    conference conversation
  • Invite the student to set an agenda for the
    conference.
  • Get on a line of thinking about the students
    writing work by asking questions and reading the
    students writing.
  • Decide what to teach the student.

59
General Structure of a Writing Conference
  • The teachers role in the second part of the
    conference conversation
  • Give the student critical feedback.
  • Teach the student.
  • Nudge the student to have-a-go.
  • Link the conference to the students independent
    work.

60
Peer Conferences
  • Allow the writer to talk about his or her
    learning. The listener shares in this celebration
    and points
  • out other positive aspects
  • of growth and progress.

61
Peer Conferences
  • Develop conference ground rules as a class
  • Let your partner hold his or her own writing.
  • Give positive feedback first and suggestions for
    improvement afterward.
  • Ask questions instead of judging.
  • Respect the other persons effort.
  • Teacher chooses partners at first.

62
Peer Conferences
  • Teacher Models conference
  • asking questions like these
  • Why did you choose your first piece?
  • What other kinds of pieces have you selected for
    your portfolio?
  • What piece do you plan to share with the teacher?
  • What do you think you learned?
  • Did you discover that you learned any new
    strategies?

63
Peer Conferences
  • Students complete
  • Peer Conference Form
  • Sample form entries
  • I am most impressed by
  • My favorite entry in the portfolio is
    because(name) shows strengths in the following
    areas of reading or writing
  • Recommendations I would make for next time
  • Additional comments

64
Teacher/Student Conference
  • Keep records
  • that support observation
  • Notes taken during reading and writing
    conferences
  • Notes taken during shared book discussions
  • Your notebook, which contains anecdotal records
    based on observations youve made
  • Checklists of developmental milestones
  • The baseline information forms from early in the
    semester
  • Your gradebook

65
Teacher/Student Conference
  • Use a Writing Conference Notes Form
  • Sample Observations
  • Student reflected on
  • Criteria that were met
  • Areas of growth
  • Areas for development
  • Students goals
  • Teachers reflections
  • Teachers goals for the student

66
Sample Conference Questions
  • Getting started
  • What would you like to share?
  • What kinds of pieces have you selected for your
    portfolio?
  • What will a reader learn about you from your
    portfolio?
  • What new learning does your portfolio show?
  • How does the writing in this portfolio compare to
    your first writing sample?
  • How has your writing changed?

67
Sample Conference Questions
  • Additional questions
  • What area is strongest (genre, strategy, or other
    focus of instruction)?
  • How do the choices in your portfolio show your
    new strategies?
  • What things did you learn about yourself in
    developing this portfolio?
  • Which aspects of your reading and writing
    improved?
  • Which criteria of proficient readers and writers
    of (strategy or genre) are seen in your work?
  • Which criteria did you satisfy that caused you to
    select this piece of work?
  • What does it show about you as a learner?

68
Sample Conference Questions
  • What was your purpose in
  • choosing this topic, project?
  • Did you accomplish your purpose?
  • What would you do differently?
  • What special knowledge or interest did you use to
    make this project meaningful?
  • What obstacles did you overcome to make it
    meaningful?
  • If this is a best work piece, explain the
    process you followed to make it a best work.
  • Now that you have evaluated this piece of work,
    what criteria would you strive to meet next time
    you do this type of assignment or project?
  • What are your goals for reading? for writing?

69
Setting Goals Be Specific
  • Sample goals
  • Learn a strategy for learning an unfamiliar word.
  • Use short sentences to create emphasis.
  • Use another structure for writing a narrative
    other than starting when you woke up and ending
    when you went to bed.
  • Brainstorm more specific goals.

70
What do the other students do?
  • If students are at different stages in the
    process, designate a corner of the room where
    students can conference.

71
What do the other students do?
  • List options for student activity while
    conferences are taking place
  • Make your own decisions.
  • Ask a neighbor for help.
  • Go to a learning center.
  • Do research on the computer.
  • Read a book.
  • Work on a piece of writing.
  • Write in journals.
  • Draw a picture to go with your reading or
    writing.
  • Work on the next step of a project.
  • Do homework.

72
What do the other students do?
  • Relate the idea that conferences are sacred.
  • Reinforce---Reinforce---Reinforce

73
Informal Conferences
  • Have chair, will travel.Use a rolling chair to
    travel from desk to desk.
  • Mini conferencesCirculate during writing
    workshop, meeting briefly with students as
    needed.
  • Conference by letter / email.

74
References
  • Anderson, Carl. Hows it Going? A Practical
    Guide to Conferring with Student Writers.
    Heinemann, 2000.
  • Schipper and Rossi. Portfolios in the Classroom
    Tools for Learning and Instruction. Stenhouse,
    1997.

75
TheTeacher Toolbox ProjectModel Lessons
  • ELA Grade 7
  • Unit 3
  • Welcome

76
Unit Three-Overview
  • Historical Fiction
  • I, Juan de Pareja

77
Major Concepts
  • Historical Fiction
  • Reading Strategies
  • Vocabulary Development
  • Art Connections
  • Style
  • Sentence Patterns

78
Products / Assessments
  • Vocabulary Activities
  • Showing and Telling Writing
  • Parallel Writing
  • Sentence Chunking
  • Writing Assignment
  • Test

79
Materials
  • Copies of I, Juan de Pareja, Chapter One
  • Overhead projector
  • Transparencies
  • Vis-à-vis pen
  • Computer with Internet Access (A5)
  • Thesauruses and Dictionaries
  • Blackline masters, copied

80
Strategies
  • Think-aloud
  • Literature circles
  • Modeling
  • Writing conferences
  • Mini-lessons

81
Historical Fiction
82
Historical Fiction
  • Have you ever read a book that was set in the
    past?
  • What other eras (time periods) have you read
    stories about?
  • What are some details that were included from
    that era?
  • Imagine you were writing about something that
    happened during the American Revolution (or Texas
    Revolution, or Ancient Greece, or another era).
  • What are some setting, character, or plot details
    you might include from that era?

B2, A1
83
Historical Fiction
  • Beck article
  • Well-told story first
  • Historical details second
  • Categories
  • Glimpses of everyday life
  • Real-life historical figures
  • On and behind the front lines
  • Oppressed peoples

A1
84
Introducing the Text
  • Fountas and Pinnell, Guiding Readers and Writers,
    Grades 3-6.
  • Print Features
  • Content, Theme, Ideas
  • Text Structure
  • Language and Literature Features

A2
85
Reinforcing Reading Strategies
  • Predict
  • Connect
  • Question
  • Visualize
  • Clarify
  • Evaluate

Lesson 1 Appendix LOL
86
Reading the Text
  • Teacher reads
  • Class reads
  • Round-robin
  • Small groups
  • Pairs
  • Individual
  • Other Ideas?

87
Vocabulary Development
88
Vocabulary Development
  • Context Clues
  • Magic Square (A3, B4)
  • Concept Chart (A4, B5, B10)

89
Art Connections
90
Art Connections
  • Web Access
  • Art Links

http//www.artchive.com/artchive/V/velazquez.html
The Artchive biography of Diego Velazquez and
links to paintings http//www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint
/auth/velazquez/ WebMuseum, Parisbiography of
Diego Velazqueza, thumbnails and links to
paintings http//www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/vel
azquez_diego.html Artcyclopedialinks to
paintings by Diego Velazquez http//www.artcyclope
dia.com/artists/juan_de_pareja.html Artcyclopedia
biography of Juan de Pareja and links to
paintings http//www.costumes.org/pages/fashiondre
ss/17thCent.htm The History of Fashion and
Dress, 17th Century Europediscussion and
pictures
A5, B6
91
Optional Features
  • Literature Circles (A6)
  • Art Links (two viewings)
  • Class Reading

92
Writing Strategies Style
  • Style
  • Showing and Telling
  • Parallel Writing

93
Style
  • A manner of writing how something is said
  • Word choice
  • Sentence length
  • Tone
  • Figurative language

TAKS Reading Objective 4 How style contributes to
the effect of the text.
A8, B11
94
Showing and Telling Writing
  • Rebekah Caplans Style Study
  • B7 overview (activity)
  • B8 transparency
  • B9 handout
  • A7 answers

Reading Objective 1 Summarizing
95
Chunking
  • Divide writing into chunks of meaning.
  • Chunks often naturally take the form of clauses
    and phrases.

Writing Objective 4 Sentence Construction
A9, B12
96
Parallel Writing
  • Imitates Style
  • Professional Models
  • (Tierney, p.177)

B13
97
Writing Assignment
  • Historical Fiction A Lesson in Style
  • Formula
  • Writing Process
  • Checklists

B14
98
Points to Remember
  • Model, model, model
  • Share expectations ahead of time
  • Circulate and monitor progress
  • Adapt lesson/assignment to your students
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