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Student Payload Choices 2009 - 2010

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Limited to about 500 grams weight. Roughly a polygonal prism with 15 cm to 20 cm long sides. Mechanical structure ... Connection to Sprites, ELVES, TGF? ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Student Payload Choices 2009 - 2010


1
Student Payload Choices2009 - 2010
  • Ballooning Unit, Lecture 7

2
Balloon Payload Requirements
  • Limited to about 500 grams weight
  • Roughly a polygonal prism with 15 cm to 20 cm
    long sides
  • Mechanical structure constructed from ¾
    polystyrene foam
  • Vehicle interface is a pair of strings, separated
    by 17 cm, that pass through the payload unbroken
    and secured with spring clips.
  • Need to conduct some kind of science or
    technology experiment
  • Designed, built, tested and shown to be fully
    space worthy by May 2010.
  • You will need to successfully complete three
    major reviews of your progress.
  • 48 hours after launch you will need to have
    calibrated science results from your flight and
    present your results to an audience of
    professional scientists and engineers.

Payload mechanical interface
3
Need to begin thinking now!
  • Given the constraints, you need to think about
    and address issues throughout the academic year
  • Here we discuss some example payloads
  • Either previously developed and flown or
  • Should be feasible to develop and fly within the
    limitations of this program
  • Your team needs to choose one of these payloads
    to work on!
  • Your team will have one month to develop your
    Pre-PDR
  • Research and write the scientific background for
    your payload
  • Determine your mission goals, objectives and
    requirements
  • Establish a general schedule for payload
    development
  • Pre-PDR document is due November 25, 2009
  • Pre-PDR oral presentation is due December 1, 2009

4
Payload Choices for 2009-2010
  • Temperature, pressure, humidity and imaging
    characteristics of the atmosphere structure One
    team must do this one
  • Radiation Intensity as a function of altitude
  • Coordinate observations with payload topic 3
  • Electrical conductivity of the atmosphere as a
    function of altitude
  • Coordinate observations with payload topic 2
  • Measure intensity of UV bands as function of
    altitude to deduce properties of ozone layer
    Related to 5
  • Coordinate observations with payload topic 5
  • Directly measure concentration of ozone and NOx
    gases as a function of altitude using solid state
    ITO sensor Related to 4
  • Coordinate observations with payload topic 4
  • Investigate thermal flow and conductivity of
    boundary layer around payload
  • Investigate methods to optimize atmospheric
    temperature measurements
  • Develop an inertial sensing system which will
    provide sub-minute of arc orientation knowledge

5
1. Characteristics of the Atmosphere
  • The temperature and pressure of the atmosphere
    varies as a function of altitude.
  • Temperature initially decreases with increasing
    altitude, then increases as UV is absorbed in the
    atmosphere.
  • Pressure decreases in an exponential manner
  • This payload would implement temperature,
    pressure and humidity sensors to measure this
    variation.
  • Need to understand sensor ADC range accuracy.
  • Compare with standard atmosphere model

6
1. Characteristics of the Atmosphere
  • Provide high definition video of ground or Earth
    limb from low to high altitude
  • Coupled with the temperature, pressure and
    humidity sensors this payload provides basic
    information about the flight
  • Payload would fly a digital video camera and be
    automatically controlled to take a series of
    video segments
  • May need to include a polarizing filter to cut
    down on glare
  • Need to record images on non-volatile media to
    avoid loss during power off
  • Meeting the power and weight constraints will be
    a challenge

7
2. Radiation Intensity vs Altitude
  • Cosmic rays are high energy nuclei that originate
    outside our solar system.
  • CR interact in Earths atmosphere producing a
    shower of particles
  • The intensity of this radiation varies with
    altitude
  • This payload would determine the radiation flux
    as a function of altitude on ascent and descent
  • Two sensors to implement and compare
  • Geiger-Muller tube
  • Scintillator and solid state PM
  • Coordinate observations with atmosphere
    conductivity payload

8
3. Conductivity of Atmosphere
  • Investigate the ion content of the atmosphere as
    a function of altitude
  • Provides fundamental knowledge of the Earth
    electrical field
  • Is the level of ionization related to cosmic ray
    interactions?
  • How to clouds affect the field?
  • Connection to Sprites, ELVES, TGF???
  • Use a pair of cylindrical capacitors to measure
    positive and negative charges
  • Potentially very sensitive to noise
  • Need very careful design work and calibrations
  • Coordinate observations with radiation
    investigation

9
4. Intensity of UV versus Altitude
  • UV is absorbed by ozone in the upper atmosphere
  • Payload would measure the UV intensity as a
    function of altitude and infer the vertical
    distribution of ozone
  • One or more sensors (or the appropriate
    wavelength sensitivity) would monitor UV from the
    Sun.
  • The signal from the sensor would need to be
    conditioned and converted to a digital number by
    an ADC
  • You will need to take into account rotation of
    the balloon craft
  • Calibrations of sensor and ADC will be needed to
    determine flux

10
5. Direct Measurement of Ozone
  • Use solid state ITO sensor to directly measure
    Ozone and NOx concentration
  • Sensor changes resistance in proportion to the
    gas concentration
  • Collaborate with the University of North Florida
    to obtain the sensors
  • Need to keep sensor at constant temperature
  • Need to develop interface electronics and
    software
  • Coordinate with payload topic 4

Single ITO Sensor
Expected Ozone Concentration
HASP 2008 Flight Result
11
6. 7. Thermal Investigations
  • Investigate thermal flow conductivity of
    boundary layer around payload
  • Temperature sensors on box interior, interior
    surface, exterior surface, 5 cm boom and 10 cm
    boom
  • Determine heat flow and the payload effect on
    measuring the temperature of the atmosphere.
  • Optimizing thermal shields for temperature
    sensors
  • Temperature sensors on 10 cm booms with white,
    black, checkered and silver shields
  • Measure and model the atmospheric temperature
    measured by the four sensors

12
8. Minute of Arc Inertial System
  • Develop an inertial attitude sensing system that
    would be accurate to less than one minute of arc
  • Use to investigate the rotation and turbulence of
    the payload during flight
  • Use some combination of magnetometer compass,
    tilt sensors, fiber-optic gyroscopes,
    accelerometers and a sun sensor
  • Develop system that would determine payload
    attitude to about one arc-minute
  • Correlate observed turbulence with atmosphere
    layers

13
Deadline!
  • By 5 p.m. Tuesday November 3 e-mail to me your
    first second payload choices.
  • Include the following in the body of your e-mail
  • Your name
  • Your team designator
  • First priority payload type (i.e. from slide 4
    here)
  • Second priority payload type
  • The kind of role (e.g. software, electronics,
    design, management) you see for yourself on the
    payload team
  • guzik_at_phunds.phys.lsu.edu
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