Using Our New Language Standards - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Using Our New Language Standards PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 2010b4-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Using Our New Language Standards

Description:

... will articulate and listen to various points of view related to the day's topic. ... She lives with her grandparents who speak Din and little English. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:38
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 61
Provided by: cesdp9
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Using Our New Language Standards


1
Using Our New Language Standards
Academic English is not a natural language.It
must be explicitly taught not merely caught.(
Kinsella, 2006)
Center for the Education and Study of Diverse
Populations at New Mexico Highlands University
2
Content Objectives
  • Understand the concept of sheltered instruction
  • Understand the importance of lesson preparation
    and the integration of content and language
    objectives
  • Develop a working knowledge of the new ELD
    Standards

3
Language Objectives
  • Participants will recall and list topical
    information from readings, previous trainings and
    personal experiences.
  • Participants will articulate and listen to
    various points of view related to the days
    topic.
  • Participants will negotiate meaning from and
    respond to readings and essential questions
    related to sheltered instruction and lesson
    preparation.

4
Language Objectives
  • Individually and in groups begin to synthesize
    the days information through dialogue and
    reflection.
  • Participants will work in groups to apply the
    knowledge of the day in the creation of a lesson
    plan that takes into account the realities of the
    classroom.

5
What is Sheltered Instruction?
6
What is Sheltered Instruction?
Sheltered instruction is an approach for
teaching content to English Language Learners in
strategic ways that make the subject matter
concepts comprehensible while promoting the
students English language development. Echeva
rria, Vogt and Short, Making Content
Comprehensible for English Language Learners,
2004, 2007, 2010
7
Why is it necessary?
8
Why is it necessary?
  • In many of our classrooms the level of the
    textbook we are teaching from does not match the
    academic language level of our students.
  • The academic content and language of the text is
    difficult for students to negotiate.

9
Why is it necessary?
  • Watering down the curriculum allows students to
    read the curriculum.
  • but
  • The richness of the content concepts are lost.

10
  • Sheltered Instruction
  • is good for ALL students
  • but it is IMPERATIVE for students
  • with a language or learning challenge!
  • Mary Ellen Vogt, 2004 2007

11
Eight Core Componentsof High Quality Sheltered
Instruction
  • Preparation
  • Building Background
  • Comprehensible Input
  • Strategies
  • Interaction
  • Practice / Application
  • Lesson Delivery
  • Review / Assessment

12
Observation Protocol
13
Dilemma
  • If we agree that these are strong and useful
    ideas, what is the best way for us to make sure
    they happen every day?

14
Lesson Preparation
  • What
  • For maximum learning to
  • occur, planning must
  • produce lessons that enable
  • students to make
  • connections between their
  • own knowledge and
  • experiences, and the new
  • information being taught. 
  • Why
  • Lesson planning is critical to
  • both a student's and
  • teachers success.
  •  
  • When
  • Every lesson
  • How
  • Adaptation of content
  • Meaningful activities
  • Supplementary materials
  • Plan for language

 
 
15
Content Objectives
  • What are they?
  • Why use them?

16
Language Objectives
  • What are they?
  • Why use them?

17
Weaving Academic Language into Instructional
Planning
  • Content Objectives Focus of the Lesson (What
    students should know and be able to do.)
  • Language Objectives Focus on Language
    Development, Language Needs Language Use for
    the Lesson (How Listening, Speaking, Reading and
    Writing will be incorporated into the lesson.)

18
Content and Language Objectives
  • Content objectives
  • are the
  • Language objectives
  • are the

HOW
WHAT
19
Content Objectives
  • Statements that identify what students should
    know and be able to do in particular content
    areas.
  • They support school, district, and state content
    standards and learning outcomes.
  • When teaching ELLs, content objectives for each
    lesson need to be tied to specific grade-level
    content standards.
  • They guide teaching and learning in the
    classroom.

20
Language Objectives
  • Statements that identify what students should
    know and be able to do while using English (or
    another language).
  • They support students language development often
    focusing on vocabulary, functional language,
    questioning, articulating predictions or
    hypotheses, reading, and writing.

21
Verbs for Language Objectives
  • recall
  • recite
  • list
  • elaborate
  • define
  • apply
  • infer
  • justify
  • revise
  • pre-write
  • draft
  • publish
  • predict
  • write
  • identify
  • negotiate
  • compare
  • contrast
  • listen
  • respond
  • interpret
  • describe
  • observe
  • sequence
  • synthesize

22
Reasons for Talking in Class
  • Practice academic language
  • Informal assessment of language/content
  • Deepen, strengthen concepts
  • Confidence, empowers, safe
  • Socialize, build relationships
  • Management, strengthens routines

While teachers develop language objectives they
should ask themselves, What are my students
doing today to develop their language skills in
reading, writing, listening, speaking and
thinking?
23
More Reasons for Talking in Class
  • Interest, engagement
  • Transfers to writing
  • Transfers to other subjects
  • Impacts quality
  • Strengthens both L1 and L2
  • Listening!!!!!

24
Language Domains
  • Listening process, understand, interpret, and
    evaluate spoken language in a variety of
    situations
  • Speaking engage in oral communication in a
    variety of situations for a variety of purposes
    and audiences
  • Reading process, understand, interpret, and
    evaluate written language, symbols and text with
    understanding and fluency
  • Writing engage in written communication in a
    variety of situations for a variety of purposes
    and audiences

New Mexico ELD Standards 2009
25
Language Domains
  • Why are the language domains important?

26
Teaching Academic LanguageSome Important
Concepts
  • Language Domains
  • Different types of language are required for the
    discussion of different topics. Many topics
    require specific vocabulary and sometimes even
    specific grammatical structures.
  • Academic Language
  • The variety of language used for academic
    purposes in our school settings. (Bricks and
    Mortar)

27
Teaching Academic LanguageSome Important
Concepts
  • BICS
  • Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills refer
    to a type of everyday language that is commonly
    used for social interaction.
  • CALP
  • Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency refers
    to the more abstract variety of language commonly
    used in academic classes. Abstract language
    refers to language that is used to discuss
    objects or people who are not present in the
    here and now, as well as concepts or ideas.

(Adapted from Elaine Horwitz, 2007)
28
Remember
  • Children are capable of high level thinking
    regardless of their language level.
  • Margo Gottlieb, Ph.D., WIDA Lead Developer, 2009

29
Content Language Objectives
  • Who gets to see them?

30
Objectives
  • Should be
  • Stated clearly and simply in student friendly
    language and
  • Posted and referred to before, during and after
    the lesson.

31
Sample Content and Language Objectives9th Grade
Geometry
  • Content Objective
  • 9-12.G.1.2 Find the area and perimeter of a
    geometric figure composed of a combination of two
    or more rectangles, triangles, and/or semicircles
    with just edges in common.
  • Language Objectives
  • With your learning partner you will use
    mathematical vocabulary to explain the process
    for finding the area and perimeter of geometric
    figures.
  • During a carousel activity, your group will
    construct a Venn Diagram to contrast and compare
    the area and perimeter of one geometric figure to
    another.
  • Work in pairs to solve and justify statements
    about the area and perimeter of geometric
    figures.

32
  • Collaboration and Discussion
  • What are some advantages to writing both content
    objectives and language objectives for students
    to hear and see?
  • How might written objectives affect teacher and
    student performance in the classroom?

33
(No Transcript)
34
Break!!!!!!7.5
35
NM English Language Development Standards

36
NM English Language Development Standards
  • What is our schema related to standards?
  • What have you heard and what do you know about
    the NMELD Standards?

37
NM English Language Development Standards
  • The NMELD Standards are unlike anything we have
    experienced in New Mexico.
  • They are first and foremost language standards.
  • Social and Instructional Language
  • The Language of Language Arts
  • The Language of Mathematics
  • The Language of Science
  • The Language of Social Studies
  • Meant to be flexible and adaptable.

38
NM English Language Development Standards
  • English language development standards are the
    bridge to enable learners to access the content
    requisite for academic success through language
    (Academic Language and Thinking).

39
Let Me Throw Some Bricks and Mortar at You!
  • Framework
  • Formative
  • Summative
  • Language Proficiency Level
  • Entering
  • Emerging
  • Developing
  • Expanding
  • Bridging

40
Let Me Throw Some Bricks and Mortar at You!
  • Language Domain
  • Grade Level Cluster
  • Genre
  • Model Performance Indicator (MPI)
  • Language Function
  • Example Topic
  • Support
  • Transformation

41
(No Transcript)
42
Supports
43
Model Performance Indicator
44
(No Transcript)
45
(No Transcript)
46
Transformations
47
Transformations
48
Transformations
49
Transformations
50
Transformations
51
Organization of the Standards
  • 2 Frameworks
  • 5 English Language Proficiency Standards
  • 5 Grade Level Clusters
  • 4 Language Domains
  • 5 Levels of English Language Proficiency
  • 200 Example Topics and Model Performance
    Indicators (MPIs)

52
Using the Standards
  • No numbers but rather an emphasis on language,
    content and support. (Mindfully prodding you
    towards Content and Language Objectives)
  • Make it topic or subject specific. Make it real
    for you! Make it work for you!
  • You are never held to what is in the box this
    can change!

53
Using the Standards
  • Step 1 Determine English Language Learners
    current language profiles
  • Step 2 Analyze the language demands of a
    content topic
  • Step 3 Match ELD standards to language demands,
    and decide whether and which transformations are
    necessary.
  • Step 4 Develop content and language objectives.

54
Using the Standards
  • Step 5 Differentiate instructional and
    assessment activities by the students levels of
    English language proficiency.
  • Step 6 Plan for instructional supports and vary
    the supports used.
  • Step 7 Review evidence of language learning and
    decide next steps.

55
A Case Study
  • Lets apply our knowledge!

56
Activity Teaching Scenarios
Coleen is twelve years old and has lived in New
Mexico all her life. She lives with her
grandparents who speak Diné and little English.
She is quiet during classroom discussions, but is
very proficient in social conversations. She
is very frustrated with school. She comprehends
portions of the science textbook and attempts to
use academic vocabulary. She is able to complete
some of the written assignments, but has
difficulty summarizing her thoughts. She doesnt
believe she needs any assistance because she can
speak English very well with her friends.
However, she doesnt understand why she is having
difficulties in Biology.
57
Where is Coleen?
58
Activity Writing Language Objectives30 Minutes
(Be prepared to share!!!!!)
  • Writing Language Objectives
  • Work in groups of 3-4. Each group will be given
    a specific grade level and content standard.
  • Select a performance standard from the NM Content
    Standards and Benchmarks. This will function as
    your Content Objective.
  • Choose any two language proficiency levels.
  • Determine which ELD standard, grade level
    cluster, MPI, transformation will support you
    with this content objective.
  • Write at least 3 Language Objectives for the
    Content Objective you have chosen.
  • Remember that the Content Objective is the WHAT
    and the Language Objective is the HOW.

59
Verbs for Language Objectives
Observe Sequence Synthesize Recite Elaborate Defin
e Apply Pre-write Draft Publish Write Negotiate
Listen Identify Classify Collect Distinguish Categ
orize Match Show Select Construct Assemble Arrange
Name Recall Give Examples Draw Organize Decide
Describe Tell
Interpret Outline Summarize Suppose Estimate Judg
e Explain Debate Illustrate Infer Revise
Rewrite Assess Justify Critique Compare Contrast
Question Map Discriminate
Create Dramatize Locate List Underline Review Com
pose Dictate Point out Record Report
Predict Express Plan and Evaluate Relate
Generalize Demonstrate Restate
Respond
60
Thank you!
  • Patricia Latham
  • palatham_at_cesdp.nmhu.edu
  • Adrian Sandoval
  • aisandoval_at_cesdp.nmhu.edu
  • Phone 505-243-4442

Center for the Education and Study of Diverse
Populations at New Mexico Highlands University
About PowerShow.com