Five Day Read Aloud Strategy: For Preschool and Kindergarten Children - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Five Day Read Aloud Strategy: For Preschool and Kindergarten Children PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 1f37ad-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Five Day Read Aloud Strategy: For Preschool and Kindergarten Children

Description:

Five Day Read Aloud Strategy: For Preschool and Kindergarten Children – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:833
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 50
Provided by: scred1
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Five Day Read Aloud Strategy: For Preschool and Kindergarten Children


1
Five Day Read Aloud Strategy For Preschool and
Kindergarten Children
  • Presentation for MN RtI Center
  • By
  • Karen Beckstrom
  • Early Childhood Collaborative Planner
  • St. Croix River Education District

2
Warm Up Activity
  • Kids say the darndest things

3
Objectives
  • Participants will review the research that
    supports a Five Day Read Aloud
  • Participants will understand how the Five Day
    Read Aloud fits into the 3 tier RtI system
  • Participants will look at the individual
    components for each day of the Five Day Read
    Aloud
  • Participants will look at program options

4
Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experience
of Young American Children
  • Betty Hart Todd Risley (1995)
  • Preschool program failed to equalize the large
    discrepancies in language development of high and
    low income children
  • Hypothesis Parenting styles must differ widely

5
Study Components
  • 42 families with young children
  • 13 upper SES (Professional Class)
  • 10 middle SES
  • 13 lower SES
  • 6 on Welfare (Low Income Class)
  • They spent 2 1/2 years, one hour per month,
    with each family in their home, recording every
    word spoken between parent and child (childrens
    age range was 10 months - 3 years)

(Working Class)
6
Findings
  • There are large differences between families and
    these differences add up
  • Words children hear per year at home
  • Professional Class 11 million words
  • Working Class 6 million words
  • Low Income Class 3 million words

7
Findings contd
  • Amount of family talk is a characteristic of low
    and high social and economic class
  • Professional Class Talkative
  • Working Class vary greatly from most talkative
    to most taciturn
  • Low Income Class more taciturn

8
Findings contd
  • Revelation of the profound effects of environment
    on development and the individuals ability to
    succeed at school and in the workplace
  • Not parenting style - just talking more
  • Vocabulary has to be connected with adults
  • Race, gender, and birth order didnt matter

9
Kind of Talk Matters!
  • Low Income Homes 80 negative
  • Working Class Homes 50 negative
  • Professional Class Homes gt 50 of talk was
    positive

10
Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children
  • National Research Council (1998)
  • Catherine Snow, Ph. D. (co-author)

11
Preventing Reading Difficulties contd
  • Best single predictor of success in school is
    vocabulary
  • Research has shown the vocabulary children take
    into kindergarten predicts vocabulary over time

12
Preventing Reading Difficulties contd
  • The quality of adult-child discourse is important
    as is the amount of such interaction
  • Key predictors for 4th grade reading success
  • Vocabulary from home
  • Word recognition taught in school

13
Vocabulary
  • To obtain sufficient vocabulary for grade-level
    reading comprehension, which is deeply implicated
    in overall academic success, young children need
    to acquire about two new word meanings per day,
    on average from the age of 1, in order to build
    up a stock of about 6,000 root words by grade 2
    (Biemiller Slonim, 2001)

14
Vocabulary contd
  • For those children adding less than one word per
    day (on average), reading comprehension likely
    will falter and fall below grade level in 3rd
    grade and beyond (Hart Risley, 2003)

15
Importance of Language
  • Five year olds starting school come in knowing
    between 4,000-12,000 words
  • Children need to know 10,000 to 12,000 words to
    be successful readers

16
Not Born to Read
  • Brain designation for reading is not located in
    specific areas but require many parts to work
    together
  • Reading is a different task compared to language
  • Breaking the Code very different and difficult

17
Early Literacy
  • Sadly, more than one-third of Americas young
    children enter kindergarten lacking the pre -
    literacy skills crucial to school success.
    (Partnership for Reading,2001)

18
RtI and Read Aloud Strategy
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
19
(No Transcript)
20
Repeated Interactive Read-Alouds in Preschool and
Kindergarten (Iannucci, 2007)
  • Research has demonstrated that the most effective
    read-alouds are those in which children are
    actively involved asking questions and making
    predictions rather than passively listening
    (Dickinson, 2001)

21
Repeated Interactive Read-Alouds in Preschool and
Kindergarten contd
  • These read-alouds are called interactive or
    dialogic and result in gains in vocabulary
    (Hargrave Senechal, 2000)
  • Merely inviting children to talk during
    interactive read-alouds, however, is not
    sufficient to accelerate their literacy
    development. Instead, growth is related to how
    frequently they engage in analytic talk
    (Dickinson Smith, 1994)

22
The Kind of Questions Matter!
  • Close-ended question
  • Open-ended question
  • Creative question
  • SEEDS, 2008

23
Practice Time!
  • Choose a book on your table
  • In groups, write 2 questions for each type of
    question
  • Closed ended question
  • Open ended question
  • Creative question

24
Read Aloud Practices (Iannucci, 2007)
  • After observing in hundreds of preschool and
    kindergarten classrooms it was noticed
  • Fewer teachers seem to be attempting to read what
    we consider sophisticated stories and nonfiction
    books in preschool and kindergarten

25
Read Aloud Practices contd
  • Teachers tend to favor reading easier,
    predictable, and concept books (often in Big Book
    format), especially in classrooms with high
    percentages of at-risk children

26
Read Aloud Practices contd
  • Children need
  • Exposure to wide range of stories and books
  • See themselves as well as others
  • See how characters handle the same life
    experiences as them
  • (Barton Booth, 1990)

27
Read Aloud Practices contd
  • Selecting a wide range of culturally diverse
    books, will help all children find and make
    connections to their own life experiences, other
    books they have read, and universal concepts.
  • (Dyson
    Genishi, 1994)

28
Read Aloud Practices contd
  • Children use real life to help them understand
    books, and books help children understand real
    life. Choose books that invite children to
    respond with enthusiasm and understanding. Look
    for books with rich language, meaningful plots,
    compelling characters, and engaging illustrations
  • (Gambrell
    Almasi, 1996)

29
Compare Book Types
  • Sophisticated and Nonfiction
  • Reader infer characters motivations and thoughts
    and connects them to actions
  • Expands vocabulary and enhances comprehension
  • Predictable and Concept books
  • Reader enjoys repeated words and actions
  • Children tend to not engage in analytic talk

30
Lets Put This Idea to The Test!
  • Henny Penny
  • by Paul Galdone
  • K is for Kissing a
  • Cool Kangaroo
  • by Giles Andreae

31
Day 1
  • Book introduction
  • Vocabulary support techniques
  • Analytical comments and questions
  • After reading why questions
  • (Iannucci www.readingrockets.org)

32
Day 1 Book Introduction
  • What you should do
  • What you shouldnt do

33
Day 1 Vocabulary Support Techniques
  • Lesson Plan select 5-10 words or phrases
  • Insert a short phrase or sentence while reading
  • Point to an illustration to clarify
  • Use dramatic gestures
  • Use of voice
  • Vary pacing of words to fit story

34
Day 1 Analytical Comments and Questions
  • Keeps children on topic
  • A Systematic approach to expand comprehension
  • Models metacognition

35
Blooms Taxonomy
  • Higher Level Questions
  • Analysis
  • Synthesis
  • Evaluation
  • Lowest Level Questions
  • Knowledge
  • Comprehension
  • Application

36
Day 1 After Reading Questions
  • Ask why questions
  • Use follow-up probing questions
  • Model metacognition

Why do you think
37
Day 2
  • Discuss story elements
  • Ask open ended questions
  • Feeling questions
  • Discuss beginning/middle/end
  • Problem/solution
  • Infer, predict, summarize

Reading for accountable talk nicole
38
Day 3
  • Guided reconstruction of story
  • Use illustrations to prompt
  • Read some text
  • Further extend vocabulary
  • Extend some word meanings to a familiar context
  • Continue to
  • insert verbal explanations of words
  • Point to illustrations
  • Make dramatic motions


39
Day 4 Concepts of Print
  • Show
  • Front of book
  • First page
  • Where to start reading
  • How to move left to right
  • Return sweep
  • Words/letters

Repeated Read Aloud day 4 rochester
40
Day 4 contd
  • Notice/locate words and meanings
  • Use the word wall
  • Vocabulary and sight words
  • Stress rhyming words
  • Stress alliterative words
  • Talk about word chunks (ex. -at)
  • Clap out/count syllables and words

41
SEEDS of Early Literacy Coaching
42
(No Transcript)
43
(No Transcript)
44
(No Transcript)
45
(No Transcript)
46
Day 5 Retelling
  • Read for enjoyment and concept development
  • Act it out!
  • Pretend
  • Use storytelling props

talking about 5 day
47
Alternate Formats
  • For 2 day per week program
  • Create 4 day lesson plan
  • Read over 2 week period
  • For 3 day per week program
  • Create 3 day lesson plan
  • Day 1
  • Combine Day 2 3
  • Combine Day 4 5

48
Revisit Objectives
  • Participants will review the research that
    supports a Five Day Read Aloud
  • Participants will understand how the Five Day
    Read Aloud fits into the 3 tier RtI system
  • Participants will look at the individual
    components for each day of the Five Day Read
    Aloud
  • Participants will look at program options

49
Questions/Comments
  • Karen Beckstrom, EC Collaborative Planner
  • Kbeckstrom_at_scred.k12.mn.us
  • Direct 320-358-1206
  • Metro 651-674-2436
About PowerShow.com