ENERGY STAR in review ENERGY STAR Participants Meeting - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – ENERGY STAR in review ENERGY STAR Participants Meeting PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 1eab8b-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

ENERGY STAR in review ENERGY STAR Participants Meeting

Description:

xmlns:exif='http://ns.adobe.com/exif/1.0/' exif:ColorSpace 1 /exif:ColorSpace ... xmlns:stRef='http://ns.adobe.com/xap/1.0/sType/ResourceRef ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:51
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 60
Provided by: trin169
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: ENERGY STAR in review ENERGY STAR Participants Meeting


1
ENERGY STAR in review ENERGY STAR Participants
Meeting
  • Anne Wilkins and Katherine Delves
  • Office of Energy Efficiency
  • June 4, 2008

2
ENERGY STAR in Canada 2007-2008
  • Program highlights a review of activities
  • Managing the ENERGY STAR Brand
  • Loyalty and Brand Equity
  • Maintaining the Brand
  • Overview of product criteria and levels
  • Delivering energy savings (integrity of the mark)

3
Why we should always Look for ENERGY STAR
4
Anne meets the Maytag Man
5
Managing the ENERGY STAR Program where we are
today
6
Our program successes
  • ENERGY STAR
  • New and more stringent criteria
  • Canada develops decorative light strings spec
  • Begins work on heat recovery ventilators
  • Part of rebate requirements for ecoENERGY
  • Retrofit initiative
  • Criteria for rebates, incentives and tax
    exemptions in environmental programs (LEED) in
    info and web sites in all provinces and
    territories
  • New houses program expanded to Saskatchewan
  • Requirement for NMSO for office equipment
  • Requirement in various social housing procurement
    programs for appliance replacements

7
How we help
  • Broadly relevant technologies
  • ENERGY STAR web site
  • product models
  • criteria
  • extranet
  • Publications
  • ENERGY STAR calculator
  • ENERGY STAR in procurement
  • ENERGY STAR workshops
  • ENERGY STAR in the news common messaging

8
Managing the Brand
9
Awareness
10
Promotional Activities
  • Which promotional efforts did participants
    undertake during 2007?
  • 98 of participants undertook at least one of
    the promotional efforts listed below

11
Awareness of ways to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions
12
ENERGY STAR Awareness figures
13
Aided awareness by region
14
Understanding
15
Understanding the meaning of the ENERGY STAR
Ipsos-Reid Survey Tracking Study on ENERGY STAR
and EnerGuide for NRCan 2007
16
What does NRCan do to promote understanding of
ENERGY STAR
  • Material in ecoENERGY Retrofit kits
  • Pocket cards
  • Fact sheets and publications
  • ENERGY STAR web site (www.energystar.gc.ca)
  • Newspaper articles (News Canada) media
    relations answer thousands of inquiries
  • Working with our participants and other
    organizations to include ENERGY STAR in material,
    and to use the symbol correctly.

17
Differentiation
18
Influence of the label on purchasing behaviour
19
Purchasing and loyalty
Ipsos-Reid Survey Tracking Study on ENERGY STAR
and EnerGuide for NRCan 2007
20
Barriers identified
Do any of the following present barriers to the
marketing/sale/installation/promotion of ENERGY
STAR qualified products in your area? Two-thirds
of participants indicated at least one barrier,
as depicted below.
21
Relevance
22
Highlights of the ENERGY STAR Participants Survey
  • Participation rate needs to increase, to make it
    an effective evaluation tool for the program and
    its participants.
  • It is a requirement of the administrative
    arrangement
  • It helps to understand barriers and opportunities.

23
2007 ENERGY STAR Participants survey says
  • Over 90 say that YES, the ENERGY STAR symbol
    adds value to the products they manufacture and
    sell
  • ENERGY STAR mostly promoted in product/company
    literature or website
  • Activities which had the greatest impact on sales
  • Utility sponsored incentives, rebates PST
    exemptions
  • Product exchange/rebate programs
  • Community engagement, workshops and energy
    assessments
  • Sales contests
  • Prime rate loan programs
  • Incorporating better performance parts and design
    in products

24
Utility programs across Canada
Efficiency New Brunswick
Conserve Nova Scotia
Hydro Québec
Gvt of Northwest Territories
Ontario Power Authority
Kitchener Utilities
25
Utility programs across Canada
Hydro Québec
City of Sudbury
BC Hydro
Enbridge Gas
London Hydro
26
Credibility
27
Credibility
  • Consistent use of ENERGY STAR symbol - Usage
    requirements
  • Performance
  • Protecting the ENERGY STAR brand

28
Monitoring the ENERGY STAR
  • Comprehensive program to maintain program
    integrity and ensure proper use of the ENERGY
    STAR label
  • Administrative arrangement requirements
  • Program identity guidelines
  • Qualification testing through Self-Certification
  • Compliance Audit Program
  • Market Surveillance
  • Manufacturer Verification Testing
  • 3rd Party Certification and Reporting (for
    regulated products)
  • Retail Store Level Assessment
  • Monitoring use of ENERGY STAR in the media
  • Assessing the consumer experience
  • Updating performance Criteria to ensure that
    ENERGY STAR is meaningful

29
Examples of misuse of symbol
30
Examples of misuse of label or name
31
Examples of misuse of ENERGY STAR symbol or name
32
Satisfaction
33
(No Transcript)
34
(No Transcript)
35
Loyalty
36
Loyalty towards the ENERGY STAR Brand
37
Brand within a brand
38
2007 ENERGY STAR Participants Survey says..
  • Were there any other comments or suggestions on
    any other aspect of NRCans ENERGY STAR
    initiative?
  • Keep up the good work!
  • You are a wonderful service and I just wanted to
    say thank you.
  • The number of participants involved is excellent.
    Education of the general public is the main
    goal, and it is getting there.
  • Thanks for gathering our feedback.
  • Continue doing what you are doing.

39
How can we increase market penetration?
  • What additional activities should NRCan undertake
    to increase market penetration ESTAR?
  • National advertising
  • Simplified newsletter for consumers
  • Promote web site
  • Position ENERGY STAR as easy action that
    consumers can take in response to environmental
    messaging
  • Assist manufacturers to develop simple visual
    prompts to demonstrate payback period and/or ROI
    at point of sale
  • Target municipalities
  • Develop free training seminars where clusters of
    participants are located
  • Financial incentives
  • Harmonize activities of provincial governments
    and utilities, to assist participants in planning
    and forecasting activities

40
If your appliances are Avocado ... they probably
aren't Green.
41
Guiding principles for ENERGY STAR criteria
  • Significant energy savings can be realized on a
    national basis
  • Product performance can be maintained or enhanced
  • Purchasers will recover their initial investment
    within a reasonable time period
  • Efficiency can be achieved with several
    technology options, at least one of which is
    non-proprietary
  • Product energy consumption and performance can be
    measured and verified with testing
  • Effectively differentiate products and be visible
    for purchasers

42
ENERGY STAR in Canada
  • Harmonized Technology Criteria with harmonized
    markets (Canada / U.S. / World)
  • Products must first meet the requirements of the
    Energy Efficiency Regulations and Provincial
    Authorities
  • Where practical, identify Canada only deviations

43
Products and categories
Lighting CFLs Res. light fixtures DLS SSL Traffic
signals
Fenestration Windows Doors Skylights
Buildings New Homes
Home Electronics Battery chargers Telephony TV/VC
Rs DVD products Home audio External power
Adaptors DTAs
Commercial Food Service Refrigerators Freezers
Dishwashers Clothes Washers Fryers Steamers Hot
food cabinets Vending machines Icemakers
Heating Cooling Central AC Heat
pumps Boilers Furnaces Ceiling fans Room
AC Ventilating fans Thermostats
Office Equipment Computers Monitors Imaging Fax
machines Multi-function devices
Appliances Clothes washers Dishwashers Refrigerato
rs Dehumidifiers Air cleaners Water coolers Water
Heaters
44
Criteria Finalized
  • Revisions
  • Residential Light Fixtures
  • CFLs
  • External Power Adapters
  • TVs
  • Residential Refrigerators / Freezers
  • Residential / Commercial Clothes Washers
  • New Products
  • Decorative Light Strings (DLS)
  • Solid State Lighting (SSL)
  • Digital TV Adapters
  • Commercial Dishwashers
  • Commercial Icemakers

45
Criteria In development
  • Revisions
  • Set-Top Boxes
  • Computers
  • Imaging Equipment
  • Monitors
  • Commercial Solid Door Refrigerators and Freezers
  • Programmable Thermostats
  • Furnaces
  • Ventilating Fans
  • Windows, Doors and Skylights
  • New Products
  • Servers
  • Commercial Refrigerator Freezers (laboratory
    grade)
  • Commercial Griddles
  • Water Heaters
  • HRVs

46
Criteria Finalized- Revisions
  • Residential Light Fixtures Version 4.2 effective
    August 1, 2008
  • Primarily addresses GU 24 based lamps and
    coordinates with CFL criteria
  • includes Accelerated, Cycling, Thermal and
    Voltage stress test Maximum mercury content Run
    up time Packaging and labelling requirements and
    2 year warranty
  • includes performance requirements for SSL fixture
    applications
  • CFLs Version 4.0 effective December 2, 2008
  • includes max mercury levels, increased efficacy,
    add candelabra base, manufacturer 3rd party
    testing, elevated temperature testing for
    reflector CFLs
  • External Power Adapters effective November 2008
  • Increases the Active Mode efficiency requirements
  • Separate Active Mode requirements for low voltage
    EPS models
  • Reduces No-Load power limits and proposed
    separate No-Load requirements for ac-dc and ac-ac
    models
  • Adds a power factor requirement for power
    supplies with an input power of 100 watts or
    greater
  • TVs effective November 2008
  • Addresses On Mode and Standby
  • Residential Refrigerators / Freezers effective
    April 28, 2008
  • 20 more energy efficient federal government
    standard (full size, 7.75 ft3 or greater Types 1
    - 7)
  • Residential / Commercial Clothes Washers
    effective January 1, 2009
  • MEF1.8 and WF7.5 and for 2011 MEF2.0 and
    WF6.0.

47
Criteria Finalized- New Products
  • Decorative Light Strings (DLS) effective fall
    2007 (NRCan lead)
  • 1½ years in development
  • 19 qualified brands and authorized importers
  • Criteria includes visual inspection electrical
    requirements (maximum input power of 0.20 watts
    per lamp) Life test (1000 hrs) Weathering
    requirements (heat and water spray) Product
    packaging requirements
  • Solid State Lighting Luminaires (SSL) effective
    September 30, 2008
  • Limits coverage to LED systems for white light
    general illumination
  • Luminaire efficacy key metric
  • Establish 2 category specification A.
    prescriptive specs for near-term lighting
    applications and B. performance specs for all
    applications (long term)
  • Applies to luminaires for commercial and
    residential general service lighting
  • Digital TV Adapters effective January 31, 2007
  • On mode lt 8 W and sleep mode lt 1 W
  • Commercial Dishwashers
  • on average 25 more energy-efficient and 25 more
    water-efficient than standard models.
  • Commercial Icemakers
  • on average 15 more energy-efficient and 10 more
    water-efficient than standard models.

48
Criteria in development- Revisions
  • Set-Top Boxes Tier 1 effective January 2009
    Tier 2 effective January 2011
  • Independent requirements for Service Providers
    and manufacturers
  • Service Providers must buy ENERGY STAR or
    refurbish boxes to meet ENERGY STAR along with
    ensuring boxes maintain qualification in field.
    Annual requirements 2009-2011 proposed.
  • Manufacturers must meet efficiency requirements
    based on a calculated Typical Electricity
    Consumption approach
  • Computers Tier 2 final October 2008, effective
    July 2009
  • For notebooks and desktops uses an energy
    efficiency performance assessment (EEPA) tool
    developed by standards body ECMA (Eccomark) which
    will allow for scaling by computing performance
    and greater longevity and viability of spec
  • Uses similar benchmark tool for workstations
    developed by SPEC
  • Covers game consoles, thin clients with
    requirements specific to these products also
    covers desktop derived servers and integrated
    computers
  • Imaging Equipment Tier 2 final Summer 2008,
    effective April 2009
  • Address Typical Electricity Consumption (TEC)
    levels, standby for Operational Mode (OM), other
    standby requirements, digital front end guidance,
    minor clarifications
  • Ventilating Fans initiated only
  • Windows, Doors and Skylights finalize fall 2008,
    effective early 2010 (NRCan lead)
  • Changes include more stringent levels for the
    four climate zones and increased testing,
    certification and labelling requirements
  • NRCan is also trying to coordinate the changes
    with the U.S. DoE who are also proposing changes
    to their own program.
  • Discussion with industry and other key
    stakeholders is continuing.

49
Criteria in development- Revisions
  • Boilers and Furnaces Tier II effective October
    1, 2008
  • Considering going from 90 to 92 for gas and 83
    to 85 for oil. (consideration to include
    electrical criteria postponed to Tier II)
  • Industry and NRCan support for 92 AFUE for gas.
  • Some Industry concern with the availability of
    oil furnaces at 85 COHA supports 85 oil
    furnace.
  • Programmable Thermostats current spec expires
    March 2009
  • Little differentiation between ENERGY STAR
    qualified PT and nonqualified PT. Cost and energy
    savings are not assured, dependent on consumer
    behavior.
  • Initiating a consumer education campaign and
    requiring partners to participate
  • Working with industry to develop a new Criteria
    that will identify and reinforce energy saving
    behavior by the consumer
  • Monitors final Fall 2008, effective Summer 2009
  • Expanding scope to include small (digital picture
    frames) and big (professional displays)
  • Possible convergence at a later time with TV spec
    into one Display spec,
  • Power requirements with different
    features/interfaces.
  • Commercial Solid Door Refrigerators and Freezers
    Finalize Summer 2008, effective May 2009
  • To include transparent door and hinged door units
  • Make energy requirements more stringent

50
Criteria in development New products
  • Servers Finalize and make effective December
    2008
  • Current Tier 1 Considerations
  • Power supply efficiency and/or net power
    consumption
  • Standard reporting requirements (standardized
    data sheet)
  • Power and temperature reporting requirements
  • Idle power looking for input on prevalence in
    data center
  • Power management and virtualization hooks
  • Proposed Tier 2 Approach utilize industry
    developed energy performance benchmarks to derive
    requirements
  • HRV finalize Q1 2009, effective date TBD (NRCan
    lead)
  • Considerations include
  • Sensible Recovery Efficiency (SRE) at 0 degrees C
  • SRE at -25oC
  • Air movement efficiency - minimum net air flow
    per W
  • maximum standby power
  • annual electrical use
  • Labelling regarding installation - with main
    message to be that for systems using furnace fan
    and ductwork, ECM for furnace is highly
    recommended.

51
Criteria in development New products
  • Water heaters effective January 2009 (Final in
    US)
  • Gas Storage EF 0.62, tier II EF 0.67 (effective
    September 2010)
  • Tankless EF 0.82 Condensing EF 0.80 HPWH COP 2
    Solar Fraction in US 0.50
  • Water Heater Considerations for Canada finalize
    fall 2008
  • Tankless change scope from US 50,000-200,000
    btu/h to 150,000-250,000 btu/h
  • HPWH - allow add-on
  • Solar - test method and qualifying level to be
    based on CSA test methods and Canadian
    conditions.
  • Commercial Refrigerator Freezers (laboratory
    grade)
  • Based on ASHRAE 72, looking for data and input
    from stakeholders
  • Commercial Griddles initiated only

52
Trends in criteria
  • Consumer electronics moving from addressing
    standby to active
  • Coordination between categories
  • Addressing more than just energy
  • Ongoing compliance requirements

53
ENERGY STAR Success
  • Criteria (to be) retired
  • Exit Signs
  • Transformers
  • Traffic Signals
  • Earlier criteria used in regulation
  • Refrigerators
  • Clothes Washers
  • Dishwashers
  • Commercial Refrigeration

54
Integrity of the ENERGY STAR label
  • Comprehensive program to maintain program
    integrity and ensure proper use of the ENERGY
    STAR label
  • Partnership agreement requirements
  • Program identity guidelines
  • Qualification testing through Self-Certification
  • Compliance Audit Program
  • Market Surveillance
  • Manufacturer Verification Testing
  • 3rd Party Certification and Reporting (for
    regulated products)
  • Retail Store Level Assessment
  • Monitoring use of ENERGY STAR in the media
  • Assessing the consumer experience
  • Updating performance Criteria to ensure that
    ENERGY STAR is meaningful

55
Market surveillance
  • Results from in-store survey

56
CFL testing
PEARL
57
Manufacturer verification testing
  • In latest criteria Residential Light Fixtures and
    CFLs
  • Testing is funded by manufacturers, but is
    performed by a third-party laboratory that is
    certified by the National Voluntary Laboratory
    Accreditation Program or equivalent
  • Manufacturer testing of computers consideration
    for next criteria revision

58
Third-Party verification and reporting
  • 3rd party verification applies to ENERGY STAR
    products for which there are MEPS
  • Performance requirements reported to NRCan
  • 17 of 35 regulated products have ENERGY STAR
    criteria
  • All have online searchable databases

59
Contact information
Katherine Delves, P.Eng.613-947-1207kdelves_at_nrca
n.gc.ca Anne Wilkins 613-992-3900awilkins_at_nrcan.
gc.ca http//www.energystar.gc.ca http//www.energ
ystar.gov (US Site)
About PowerShow.com