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Regional Briefing New Student Report Cards Term 3, 2006

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Title: Regional Briefing New Student Report Cards Term 3, 2006


1
Regional Briefing New Student Report Cards Term
3, 2006
2
OUR EDUCATIVE PURPOSE

What is powerful to learn?
What is powerful learning and what promotes it?
Who do we report to?
LEARNER
Victorian Essential Learning Standards
Principles of Learning and Teaching
Students Teachers Parents Community System
How do we know it has been learnt?
Assessment Advice
3
Reporting is the process by which assessment
information is communicated in ways that assist
students, parents, teachers and the system in
making decisions by providing information about
what students know and can do, along with
recommendations for their future learning.
Why do we report?
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Key features of the new student report
cards. Reporting against statewide standards The
report card will clearly indicate where each
student is compared to the expected statewide
standard. This means that no matter where a child
attends school, he or she will be assessed
against the same standard for the year level. A
common reporting scale The report cards A to E
scale will indicate how a student is progressing
against the expected standard for that stage of
the year. A. Well above the expected standard at
this time of year B. Above the standard expected
at this time of year C. At the standard expected
at this time of year D. Below the standard
expected at this time of year E. Well below the
standard expected at this time of year. Student
progress over time The report card will chart a
students progress from the previous year to the
current year (across 12 months).
6
Features of the new Student Report Cards. Clear
information about a students strengths and
weaknesses Clear written information will inform
parents about what their child knows and can do.
It will also identify those areas where the
student needs to be further assisted or extended.
When this is the case, the report card will
clearly describe what the school will do to
support the student. Improved partnerships
between home and school The report card will make
clear the role of parents, teachers and students
in the development of each students
learning. Student involvement in reporting In
primary school, students include a written
comment about their progress in class. In
secondary school, students list personal learning
goals for the year and review their achievement
against these goals throughout the year.
7
Primary report card mandatory components
  • Part 1 Summary page
  • Student name, year level and semester
  • Graphic with
  • - relevant learning areas (domains)
  • - A-E ratings, dots, year levels
  • Prep Prep Year 2 (3 year levels)
  • Year 1 Prep Year 3 (4 year levels)
  • Year 2 Prep Year 4 (5 year levels)
  • Year 3 Year 1 Year 5 (5 year levels)
  • Year 4 Year 2 Year 6 (5 year levels)
  • Year 5 Year 3 Year 7 (5 year levels)
  • Year 6 Year 4 Year 8 (5 year levels)
  • Work habits bar chart, legend

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Primary report card mandatory components
  • Part 2 Written comments
  • Student name, year level and semester
  • Text boxes for
  • What (student name) has achieved
  • Areas for improvement/future learning
  • The school will do following to support future
    learning
  • What support can be provided at home

10
Primary report card mandatory components
  • Part 2 Written comments (continued)
  • Student comment (can be deleted for years P-2)
  • Attendance
  • Name of teacher and date
  • Parent comment and signature (on separate page)

11
Primary report card options
  • Add school logo, cover page
  • Add teacher signature
  • Add extra pages with text boxes
  • Include sections what student has achieved, areas
    for improvement and attendance, but delete other
    written comment sections if they are formally
    reported on in portfolios

12
Primary report card options (DET software)
  • Include subject pages with a graphic
  • Include a personal learning goals page as in the
    secondary template one page for each student
  • If a learning goals page is included, then the
    student comment section can be deleted from Part
    2 of the primary template

13
Secondary report card mandatory components
  • Part 1 Subject Page
  • Student name, year level and semester
  • Domains to be reported on for that subject
    (school selects)
  • Year levels, ratings, dots, work habits and
    legend
  • Year 7 Year 5 Year 9 (5 year levels)
  • Year 8 Year 6 Year 10 (5 year levels)
  • Year 9 Year 7 Beyond Year 10 (5 year
    levels)
  • Year 10 Year 8 Beyond Year 10 (4 year levels)

14
Secondary report card mandatory components
  • Part 1 Subject Page (cont.)
  • Text boxes for
  • What (student name) has achieved
  • Areas for improvement/future learning
  • School will do following to support future
    learning (can be deleted if a summary page is
    used)
  • What support can be provided at home (can be
    deleted if a summary page is used)
  • Name of teacher and date

15

16
Secondary report card mandatory components
  • Part 2 Personal Learning Goals Page
  • Student name, year level and semester
  • Text boxes for
  • My Learning Goals
  • Student comment
  • Teacher comment
  • My future learning goals
  • Attendance
  • Teacher name and date
  • Parent comment and signature (on a separate page)

17

18
Secondary report card options
  • Add school logo, cover page
  • Add teacher signature
  • Add student signature (on personal learning goals
    page)
  • Add extra pages with text boxes
  • Include sections what student has achieved, areas
    for improvement and attendance, but delete other
    written comment sections if they are formally
    reported on in portfolios

19
Secondary report card options
  • Include a summary page with
  • Student name, year level and semester
  • Graphic
  • Domains as selected by the school
  • Will be aggregated domain scores for those
    domains which have been assessed in more than one
    subject.
  • Text at base of graphic will note that more than
    one teacher may have contributed to these
    ratings.
  • Text boxes for
  • School will do following to support future
    learning
  • What support can be provided at home
  • Ratings and legend

20
Secondary report card options
  • If there is a summary page
  • In set up, domains on subject pages can be marked
    as assessed only (will only appear on summary
    page of report) OR assessed reported on subject
    pages (will appear on subject page and summary
    page of report)
  • Subject pages do NOT need to include comments on
    what the school will do and what parents can do
    if these are included on a summary page.

21
A continuum of learning Each dimension is based
on an underlying learning continuum.
Level 6
Expectations along that continuum standards at
six levels Expectations for student achievement
have been identified at six levels over the 11
years of compulsory schooling.
Level 5
Level 4
Level 3
Level 2
The expectations are outlined in the standards
which have been written for each dimension at
each of the six levels.
Level 1
22
Standards
  • Standards define what students should know and be
    able to do at different levels of schooling. They
    are, in effect, outcomes against which student
    achievement will be assessed and reported on and
    provide valuable information about student
    progress which can form the basis of further
    teaching and intervention. (Victorian Essential
    Learning Standards Overview page 8)

23
Reading Level 6 At Level 6, students read, view,
analyse, critique, reflect on and discuss
contemporary and classical imaginative texts that
explore personal, social, cultural and political
issues of significance to their own lives. They
also read, view, analyse and discuss a wide range
of informative and persuasive texts and identify
the multiple purposes for which texts are
created. They explain how texts are shaped by the
time, place and cultural setting in which they
are created. They compare and contrast the
typical features of particular texts and
synthesise information from different texts to
draw conclusions.
24
  • A Well above the expected standard at this time
    of year
  • B Above the standard expected at this time of
    year
  • C At the standard expected at this time of year
  • D Below the standard expected at this time of
    year
  • E Well below the standard expected at this time
    of year.

25
LEVEL 5
4.75
Progression points are descriptors that indicate
what typical progress towards the standard may
look like.
4.50
4.25
LEVEL 4
3.75
26
Progression points
  • Progression points assist teachers to make
    on-balance judgements about progress towards the
    standards for the purposes of reporting to
    parents
  • They range from 0.5 to 5.75
  • There is one progression point to indicate
    progress towards level one ( 0.5, 1.0).
  • There are three progression points from level 1
    onwards ( e.g.1.0, 1.25, 1.50, 1.75, 2.0, 2.25.)

27
Progression Points - timelines
  • Available currently for English and Mathematics.
  • Feedback sought during 2006. Revised versions
    published 17 December.
  • Development in other domains in progress will
    be published in October and November.

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Assessment Maps
  • Assessment maps illustrate typical progress
    towards and at the standards (from 0.5 to 6.75)
    through annotated samples of student work.

33
  • Assessment maps - the purpose
  • To assist teachers in the assessment of student
    work against the standards
  • To answer the questions
  • - what does work at this standard look like?
  • - what are the typical features of the work of
    students progressing towards a standard?
  • To assist teachers to develop common
    understanding of the standards and monitor
    students progress against the standards
  • Work samples are not intended to illustrate the
    full range of achievement.

34
Assessment maps - timelines
  • Samples currently available in English (Reading
    and Writing) and Mathematics (Measurement, chance
    and data, Number and Space) Samples for Listening
    and speaking, Working mathematically and
    Structure to be added during progressively this
    year
  • Assessment maps in other domains to be developed
    and published progressively from October to
    December (at the standards) and January to March
    (towards the standards)

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37
  • Using standards, progression points and
    assessment maps
  • To support common understanding and consistency
  • to make judgements about student work
  • as a basis for professional learning and
    moderation activities with teachers at your
    school and across schools
  • as a reference for developing schools own
    collection of student work samples
  • to talk to students/parents about their progress
    and to assist them to monitor their own progress
  • To inform learning
  • To inform and plan learning

38
Assessment Maps
Standards
Illustration of typical features of achievement
Progress towards meeting
Progression Points
39
  • Making on-balance judgements to report to parents
  • Throughout the semester, teachers assess student
    progress in tasks and activities focussing on
    relevant aspects of the Standards and progression
    points
  • Towards the end of the semester teachers consider
    all the assessment evidence to make an on-balance
    judgement of progress against the Standards and
    progression points.
  • The process is
  • evidence based
  • holistic
  • on balance

40
  • Making on-balance judgements
  • Judgements should rest on
  • a high level of familiarity with the standards,
    progression points and assessment maps
  • high quality evidence gathered from
    well-designed assessment tasks

41
  • Entering scores for end of semester reporting
  • Teachers make an on balance judgement using the
    Standards and progression points at the dimension
    level and enter the relevant score
  • The key question is
  • Which standard or progression point descriptor
    does this evidence best match?
  • NOT How much of the descriptor needs to be met?
    OR Where should the student be?

42
Entering scores for end of semester reporting
  • The software will only accept valid scores

43
  • Entering scores for English and Mathematics
  • A score for each dimension in English and
    Mathematics must be entered into the software at
    reporting time.
  • If one or more Mathematics dimensions have not
    been formally taught and assessed during the
    semester, the score(s) from the last reporting
    period must be entered.

44
Scores and A-E ratings
  • The software will add together and average
    dimension scores to provide an overall score for
    the domain.
  • The software will round up allow it to
  • The software will then produce a solid
    achievement point, and an A-E rating based on
    the domain score, the year level and the semester
    of reporting.

45
  • A-E ratings reflect a band of achievement, not
    a point
  • Any one rating will reflect a number of different
    patterns of achievement in different dimensions
  • Written comments are vital in providing the
    detail on relative areas of strength and weakness

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A-E ratings At present, schools report
students' progress in a range of different
ways. The new A-E ratings will have the same
meaning from school to school, and they will
be used to report student progress against the
same standards.
49
How do we currently use A-E ratings?
Level 6
Level 5 end of Year 8
A B C D E
E? E? E? E? E?
Level 4
To differentiate within a level? How do we decide
which grade to give? What does an E tell a
student? What specific information does the grade
provide about where a student is up to on the
learning continuum?
Level 3
Level 2
Level 1
50
Level 6
Level 5
What are the advantages of assessing progress in
terms of a learning continuum as opposed to
comparing relative performance at a level?
Level 4
Level 3
Level 2
Level 1
51
How consistent is your current use of A-E?
  • Within the school?
  • As compared with other schools?
  • How do your current A-E grades compare with your
    CSF ratings and your AIM data?

Is it important to have consistent judgements?
52
  • Consistent judgements
  • Consistent judgements rest on
  • a common interpretation of the standards and
    progression points
  • a shared understanding of what learner
    achievement against the standards and progression
    points looks like

53
  • Making consistent judgements
  • Scenario Two teachers have both assessed this
    piece of student writing. One has given it a
    score of 3.75 and the other 4.0.
  • Refer to the progression point and standard.
    Which do you think is more appropriate, 3.75 or
    4.0, and why?

54
  • Student work shows evidence of ability to
  • use structures and features of language
    appropriate to the purpose, audience and context
    the style and tone of the writing is appropriate
    for a personal account (e.g. use of the I
    voice, emotive language) and is maintained
    throughout
  • use simple figurative language and visual
    images, and a range of vocabulary (e.g. agony, I
    felt like.squeezed my eyes..)
  • use a variety of sentence structures e.g After
    experiencing.As the plane started to move.I
    was nervous but.

55
Student work shows evidence of ability to
  • use appropriate prepositions and conjunctions
    e.g. so, soon
  • punctuate accurately throughout

56
  • What about . . . .?
  • A-E ratings and S/N ratings that we already use
    in our school assessed tasks?
  • Including subject descriptions and descriptions
    and results of assessment tasks?

57
  • What about . . . .?
  • students in Year 10 working beyond level 6?
  • students on Individual Learning Plans?
  • making judgments and reporting on achievement in
    KLAs where we will still be using the CSF?

58
How can you use the new report cards to improve
learning at your school? What will be the key
challenges?
59
  • Support available for schools
  • Student reports website
  • FAQs for schools and parents
  • FAQs on software and link to DET software site
  • Sample reports
  • Articles, report inserts and slideshows for use
    with parents
  • Advice (for teachers of Mathematics, on
    developing and reporting on learning goals,
    alternatives to A-E, writing comments)
  • www.sofweb.vic.edu.au/studentreports/index.htm

60
  • Student Learning website
  • Progression points for English and Mathematics
  • Workshops using the standards and progression
    points to make judgments
  • Assessment Professional Learning Modules
  • www.sofweb.vic.edu.au/blueprint/fs1/assessment.asp

61
Workshops on using the standards and progression
points Designed to be used flexibly by school
staff approximately one hour each Workshop 1
getting to know the standards and progression
points Workshop 2 making judgments
62
Assessment Professional Learning Modules Module
1 Connecting assessment with learning linking
policy, principles and practices Module 2
Assessment FOR learning strategies to build
into your classroom Module 3 Assessment AS
learning involving students in assessment and
setting learning goals Module 4 Assessment OF
learning developing good summative assessment,
strategies for the classroom Module 5 Making
consistent teacher judgements effective
moderation strategies
63
  • Assessment Professional Learning Modules
  • Module 5
  • Making consistent teacher judgements
  • concepts of validity and consistency
  • overview of approaches to moderation
  • one way of using the standards, progression
    points and assessment maps
  • useful protocols and pro formas

64
  • Support being developed
  • Further progression points and assessment maps
    (VCAA)
  • English and Mathematics continua P-10
  • Further sample report and assessment materials
    from schools
  • Workshop 3 recording judgements
  • Extension of assessment professional learning
    modules

65
Monitoring and feedback
  • Queries and feedback
  • assessment.reporting_at_edumail.vic.gov.au

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