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Best%20Practices%20in%20College%20Student%20Retention

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End of Fall 1996 (Based on 22,467 Enrollment) What's Working in Student Retention? ... sense of control over environment. Set realistic goals and means to ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Best%20Practices%20in%20College%20Student%20Retention


1
Best Practices in College Student Retention
Santa Monica College
  • Maximizing Campus Resources to Effect Student
    Success
  • Esau Tovar John Gonzalez
  • Retention Counselor Dean, Academic Affairs

2
Scope of the Problem
  • Without systematic intervention, students at-risk
    will perform poorly or dropout from college
    within their first year of attendance.
  • Community college students are more prone to
    dropping out.
  • Freshman to Sophomore Dropout Rates By
    Institution Type
  • Source ACT Institutional Data Questionnaires
    1999
  • Two-Year Public 47.5
  • Two-Year Private 30.1
  • BA/BS Public 33.3
  • BA/BS Private 28.6
  • MA Public 30.5
  • MA Private 24.0
  • PhD Public 23.5
  • PhD Private 16.4
  • National 32.6

3
SMC Retention Information

4
Probationary Students at SMC
Distinct Student Counts-- End of Fall 1996
(Based on 22,467 Enrollment)
  • Status A and L A only L only
    Total
  • Contg 184 1,417 444 2,045
    9.1
  • Disqualified 211 329 769 1,309 5.8
  • New 453 1,787 1,005
    3,245 14.4
  • Total 848 3,533
    2,218 6,599 29.3
  • Off 59 479
    347 885 3.9

5
Whats Working in Student Retention?
6
Characteristics of Highly Successful Retention
Programs
  • Highly Structured Programs
  • THE key Intrusive, proactive approaches to
    reach students before they experience
    difficulties
  • Interlocked with other programs and services
  • Extended, intense student contact
  • Strategized to engage students
  • Track student satisfaction
  • Institution-wide buy-in and understanding
  • Recognize, reward, and celebrate student success
  • Rewards and recognition for students, faculty,
    staff, administrators

7
Establishing Retention Priorities
  • Measurable targets for
  • Recruitment
  • Retention
  • Persistence
  • Student Success
  • Student Satisfaction/Priorities

8
Best and Most Direct Way to Increase Retention
  • Assess
  • Individual needs
  • Individual attitudes
  • Individual motivation levels

9
What Needs to Occur?
  • To improve retention, we must help students
  • Connect to the environment
  • Adjust to the college transition
  • Work toward and reassess set goals
  • Succeed in their classes
  • Make them feel welcome and respected

10
Connecting to the College
  • Adjustment to College
  • Are we a student-centered campus?
  • How do we know this?
  • What do students say about their priorities?
  • How satisfied are they with our programs and
    services?
  • Do we have a true customer service orientation?

11
How Can We Improve?
12
Structured First-Year Experience
  • For most or all participants?
  • Provide academic advising
  • Heavily influenced course selection
  • Supplemental instruction (SI) Tutoring
  • Study groups
  • Services to assist with adjustment to the
    institution

13
Structured First-Year Experience
  • Academic Advising
  • Must be developmental and intrusive in nature
  • Multiple visits per semester
  • Ongoing tracking
  • Early Alert-type evaluation

14
Structured First-Year Experience
  • Heavily Influenced Course Selection
  • Learning communities
  • Freshman interest groups (FIGS)
  • Developmental instruction
  • Lecture-based vs. collaboratively taught group
    discussion
  • Assessment driven

15
Structured First-Year Experience
  • Supplemental Instruction Tutoring
  • Establish a comprehensive and ongoing training
    program
  • SI may be instructor or staff-led
  • Multiple tutors for high-risk courses

16
Structured First-Year Experience
  • Effective Study Groups
  • Most successful if led by a group leadertutor
  • Meet regularly

17
Structured First-Year Experience
  • Pre-Enrollment Services to Assist with College
    Adjustment
  • Specialized/expanded college orientation
  • Not necessarily to provide academic or enrollment
    information
  • Experiential learning Adventure recreation
    activities are offered
  • Faculty student-staff involvement

18
Structured First-Year Experience
  • "Targeted" Participant Recruitment and
    Participation Incentives
  • Admission criteria control over ongoing
    participation
  • Promote opportunities for engagementacademically
    and socially
  • Personal, meaningful, and multiple contacts with
    faculty (in and out of the classroomfield trips,
    ad hoc discussions)
  • Mentoring experience
  • Teacher/student lunches
  • Employment opportunities
  • Arranged internships and externships

19
Focus on Academic Success
  • Dont say it. Do it!

20
Encourage Support Student Success
  • Build upon students academic skills and
    confidence
  • Help students learn subject matter (e.g., SI,
    course instruction, computer-assisted
    instructional laboratories, study groups, and/or
    tutoring).
  • Clear and Effective Grading Practices
  • Communicate Expectations

21
Encourage Support Student Success
  • Extensive Student Service Contacts
  • Frequent contact with students through individual
    and group activities
  • Work with students to
  • Strengthen self-concept
  • Increase sense of control over environment
  • Set realistic goals and means to achieve them
  • Overcome negative educational experiences
  • Accept responsibility for own success/future

22
Encourage Support Student Success
  • Faculty Development Activities
  • Focused on instructional techniques, practices,
    improving retention
  • Formative Summative Assessment
  • Grading Philosophies
  • Traditional
  • Constructivist

23
Best Practices in Developmental Education
  • Boylan, Bonham, White (1999)

24
Best Policies in Developmental Education
  • Promoting institutional commitment to DE
  • Mandatory assessment and placement Provide
    comprehensive approach to DE courses and services
  • Enforce strict attendance
  • Abolish late registration in DE courses
  • Establish ongoing orientation courses and
    activities

25
Best Practices in Developmental Education
  • Centralized structure and coordination of DE
    courses
  • Encourage professional development
  • Implement classroom assessment techniques
    (learning, feedback)
  • Engage in regular and systematic program
    evaluation
  • Focus of developing metacognitive skills
  • Give frequent tests
  • Use a theory-based approach to teaching
  • Integrate classroom, learning assistance, and
    laboratory activities

26
Learning Communities
  • Models and Practices

27
Learning Communities Components
  • Students enroll in classes together
  • Best when courses are offered on a central theme
    or problem
  • Frequently team-taught
  • Use collaborative and/or problem-based learning
    approaches
  • Offer opportunities to forms connections with
    other students

28
Learning Communities Models
  • Unstructured
  • Thematic
  • Integrated

29
Learning Communities Models
  • Freshman Interest Group
  • Goal To create a small academic learning
    community in a large college setting
  • Offered as triad of courses and discussion
    group/seminar based on a theme
  • Example of FIG

Introductory Psychology

Individual Group Correlates of Gender
Sociology of Gender

Cultural Anthropology

FIG Discussion Group
30
Identifying At-Risk Students
  • Predictive Modeling Approaches

31
Identifying Potential Dropouts Unsuccessful
Students
  • Predictive Modeling Statistical analysis of
    past behavior to simulate future results
  • Examine institution's historical data
  • Isolate and weight (according to statistical
    importance) attrition indicators
  • Indicators are used to form a custom predictive
    scoring model for each student group
  • Use indicators to
  • Formulate priority-ranked intervention strategies
    based on likelihood-of-persistence ratings
    assigned to each entering student.
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