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Strengthening Families, Centers, and Programs at the State and Community Levels

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C E N T E R F O R T H E S T U D Y O F S O C I A L P O L I C Y ... Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, with Casey Family Programs, Annie E. Casey, A. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Strengthening Families, Centers, and Programs at the State and Community Levels


1
Strengthening Families, Centers, and Programs at
the State and Community Levels
C E N T E R F O R T H E S T U D Y O F S
O C I A L P O L I C Y
2
Strengthening Families has inspired a new
national approach to families that is
Available where families already go, building on
what programs and services already do Focused on
development and growth, not only on identified
problems Delivered through new, powerful
partnerships that continue to push effective
collaboration forward
3
Strengthening Families began as a search for a
new approach to child abuse prevention that
  • Is systematic
  • Is national

Reaches millions of children
Has impact long before abuse or neglect
occurs Promotes optimal development for all
children
4
Go where many children already are in early
care and education programs
Daily contact with parents and children Uniquely
intimate relationships with families A universal
approach of positive encouragement for families
An early warning and response system to the first
signs of trouble
5
quality early care and education
protective factors
??
Do ECE programs help families as well as children?
??
CAN prevention and optimal development
??
??
??
6
Just the factsa strengths approach
  • What does research tell us about what is RIGHT
    with families?
  • What family characteristics promote childrens
    healthy developmentand are linked directly to a
    reduction in child abuse and neglect, according
    to current research?

7
the protective factors framework
Parental Resilience Social Connections Knowledge
of Parenting and Child Development Concrete
Support in Times of Need Social and Emotional
Development
8
parental resilience
Psychological health parents feel supported and
able to solve problems can develop trusting
relationships with others and reach out for help
Parents who did not have positive childhood
experiences or who are in troubling circumstances
need extra support and trusting relationships
9
social connections
Relationships with extended family, friends,
co-workers, other parents with children similar
ages Community norms are developed through
social connections Mutual assistance networks
child care, emotional support, concrete help
10
knowledge of parenting and child development
Basic information about how children
develop Basic techniques of developmentally
appropriate discipline
Alternatives to parenting behaviors experienced
as a child Help with challenging behaviors
11
concrete supports
  • Response to a crisis food, clothing, shelter
  • Assistance with daily needs health care, job
    opportunities, transportation, education
  • Services for parents
  • mental health,
  • domestic violence,
  • substance abuse
  • Specialized
  • services for children

12
social and emotional development
Normal development (like using language to
express needs and feelings) creates more positive
parent-child interactions
Challenging behaviors, traumatic experiences or
development that is not on track require extra
adult attention A Surprise What learning in a
classroom does for families back at home
13
(No Transcript)
14
excellent early childhood programs are already
building protective factors every day, but often
do not recognize their impact on families
15
small but significant changes in early childhood
practice or any kind of program that reaches
families -- could produce huge results in
preventing child abuse and neglect for our
youngest children
16
the final evidence a gold standard study
Arthur Reynolds, University of Wisconsin Longitud
inal study of children and families in a program
with similar elements to those identified by CSSP
compared with others who did not
participate Results 52 reduction in
substantiated cases of child abuse and neglect by
age 17
17
Program Strategies to build Protective Factors
protective factors
Parental Resilience
Facilitate Friendships Mutual Support
Strengthen Parenting
Social Connections
CAN prevention and optimal development
Respond to Family Crises
Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development
Link Families to Services Opportunities
Value Support Parents
Concrete Supports
Facilitate Childrens Social Emotional
Development
Social and Emotional Development
Observe Respond to Early Warning Signs of CAN
18
http//www.strengtheningfamilies.net Contact Kat
e Stepletonkate.stepleton_at_cssp.org773-857-3653
C E N T E R F O R T H E S T U D Y O F S
O C I A L P O L I C Y
19
national impact
National Alliance of Childrens Trust and
Prevention Funds national learning network 20
states NAEYC accreditation changes impact on
971,000 children in 11,353 centers Curriculum
changes -- Parents as Teachers 320,000 children
Healthy Families America 50,000
families Federal Office of Child Abuse and
Neglect 2007 Community Resource Guides on
Protective Factors CDC Violence Prevention
Branch, Maternal and Child Health (ECCS), Child
Care Bureau
20
national partner organizations
Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, with Casey
Family Programs, Annie E. Casey, A.L.. Mailman,
Arthur Blank
21
impact of statewide implementation (estimate 2008)
Total Centers 34,614 Total Children 0-5 in
these centers 2,873,966
22
levers for change
  • Parent Partnerships
  • Infrastructure and Policy Changes
  • Professional Development
  • Early Childhood-Child Welfare Linkages
  • Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems Planning

23
parent partnerships
Value and support family participation in program
development and agency decision making Create a
powerful pool of family leaders by linking with
parent groups and organizations Offer training
and coaching for families to take leadership
roles and for agencies to use their participation
effectively
24
infrastructure and policy changes
Use a common framework, language, and results
definition for work with families in Licensing
requirements Quality Rating and Reimbursement
Scales Accreditation and credential
requirements Child and Family Service
Reviews MOUs and other agreements
25
professional development
Integrate common language of protective factors
into curricula for CDAs, BAs, and AAs Teach
protective factors in In-Service Trainings (e.g.
CCRRs) Teach and use protective factors in
individual program training, supervision, and
coaching Develop and use cross-trainings among
agencies and disciplines
26
child welfare-early childhood linkages
Enroll children in foster care in quality early
childhood programs Focus practice and assessment
on developmental needs, trauma, and mental health
needs for the youngest children Develop cross
training for caseworkers, teachers, and foster
families Create alternative CAN reporting
protocols and differential responses, using new
partners
27
early childhood comprehensive systems planning
Build family support into Pre-K efforts Define
family support results through Protective
Factors Agree on strategies for families to be
partners in all aspects of work Link key
services more effectively, including mental
health, family support, medical homes, early
intervention and crisis services.
28
on the horizon
  • Changes to mandatory reporting training
  • Performance standards across agencies, based on
    common protective factors, supported by practice
    changes and professional development
  • Protective Factors for families across the age
    range of children for schools and youth programs
  • New evaluation strategies based on resilience

29
the new normal
A new way of thinking about engaging families
go where they already are A new way of improving
everyday practice make small but significant
changes to enhance what programs already do A
new way of combining all our efforts to achieve
better results find and use the levers for
change in what agencies already do
30
http//www.strengtheningfamilies.net Contact Kat
e Stepletonkate.stepleton_at_cssp.org773-857-3653
C E N T E R F O R T H E S T U D Y O F S
O C I A L P O L I C Y
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