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THE%20RISE%20OF%20THE%20E-PATIENT%20Trends%20in%20the%20use%20of%20digital%20technology%20for%20health%20purposes%20%20Lee%20Rainie%20Director%20

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Title: THE%20RISE%20OF%20THE%20E-PATIENT%20Trends%20in%20the%20use%20of%20digital%20technology%20for%20health%20purposes%20%20Lee%20Rainie%20Director%20


1
THE RISE OF THE E-PATIENTTrends in the use of
digital technologyfor health purposesLee
RainieDirector Pew Internet ProjectMedical
LibrariansAtlantic City10.7.09
2
New information ecosystem Then and Now
Industrial Age Info was Scarce Expensive Institut
ionally oriented Designed for consumption
Information Age Info is Abundant Cheap Personally
oriented Designed for participation
3
The internet is the asteroid Then and now
2000 46 of adults use internet 5 with broadband
at home 50 own a cell phone 0 connect to
internet wirelessly lt10 use cloud slow,
stationary connections built around my computer
2009 77-79 of adults use internet 63 with
broadband at home 85 own a cell phone 54-56
connect to internet wirelessly gttwo-thirds use
cloud fast, mobile connections built around
outside servers and storage
4
Media ecology then (industrial age)
  • Product Route to home Display Local
    storage
  • TV stations phone TV Cassette/ 8-track
  • broadcast TV radio
  • broadcast radio stereo Vinyl album
  • News mail
  • Advertising newspaper delivery phone
  • paper
  • Radio Stations non-electronic

Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein Co
5
Media ecology now (information age)
  • Product Route to home Display Local
    storage
  • cable TiVo (PVR) VCR
  • TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player
  • Info wireless/phone radio DVD
  • Daily me broadcast TV PC Web-based
    storage
  • content books iPod
    /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR)
  • Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC
  • Web sites satellite monitor web
    storage/servers
  • Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM
  • Content from express delivery pager satellite
    player cell phone memory
  • individuals iPod / storage portable
    gamer MP3 player / iPod
  • Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell
    phone pagers - PDAs
  • Advertising newspaper
    delivery non-electronic cable box
  • Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game
    console
  • game console paper
  • Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage
    sticks/disks e-reader/Kindle

Ubiquitous computing ageCloud computingInternet
of things
Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein
Co
6
Information and media ecosystem changes
  • Volume of information grows
  • Variety of information increases
  • Velocity of information speeds up
  • The times and places to experience media enlarge
  • Peoples vigilance for information expands AND
    contracts

7
Information and media ecosystem changes
  • The immersive qualities of media are more
    compelling
  • Relevance of information improves
  • The number of information voices explodes and
    the voices become louder and more findable
  • Voting and ventilating are enabled
  • Social networks are more vivid

8
Behold Networked Individuals those with a
different sense of
  • Expectation about access to, availability of, and
    pathways to information
  • Place, distance, presence, intimacy its all
    ambient
  • Time use
  • The possibilities of work, learning, and play
  • The scalability of conversation and community
  • The persistence of digital me and digital you
  • Personal efficacy and the payoff for personal
    effort
  • Boundaries and contexts public and private
  • The rewards and challenges of networking for
    social, economic, political, and cultural
    purposes new layers and new audiences

9
A new pattern of communication and influence
built around social networks and participatory
media
  • The four As of searching and acting
  • attention
  • acquisition
  • assessment
  • action

10
Networked Individuals as e-patients
  • 61 of total population 83 of online
    population
  • 64 of women 57 of men
  • 65 of whites 51 blacks 44 Hispanics
  • Age
  • 72 of 18-29-year-olds
  • 71 of 30-49-year-olds
  • 59 of 50-64-year-olds
  • 27 of those 65 and older
  • Skews upscale and educated
  • Parents

http//e-patients.net/
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20
Other e-patient activities
  • 47 of adults have used the internet to get
    information about doctors or other health
    professionals
  • 38 have gotten information about hospitals or
    other medical facilities
  • 33 have gotten information about how to lose or
    control their weight
  • 27 have gotten information about health
    insurance
  • 12 have gotten information about how to stay
    healthy on an overseas trip

21
60 of e-patients engage with social media
  • 41 have read someone else's commentary or
    experience about health or medical issues on an
    online news group, website, or blog.
  • 24 have consulted rankings or reviews online of
    hospitals/other medical facilities.
  • 24 have consulted rankings or reviews of docs or
    other providers.
  • 19 have signed up to receive updates about
    health or medical issues.
  • 13 have listened to a podcast about health or
    medical issues.

22
20 of e-patients are e-participators
  • 6 have tagged or categorized content about
    health issues.
  • 6 have posted comments about health issues in an
    online discussion, listserv, or other online
    group forum.
  • 5 have posted comments about health on a blog.
  • 5 have reviewed a doctor.
  • 4 have reviewed a hospital.
  • 4 have shared photos, videos or audio files
    online about health or medical issues.

23
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24
A handy tech-user typology
  • http//www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2009/5-The-Mobi
    le-Difference--Typology.aspx

25
What we measured
  • Assets
  • Actions
  • Attitudes

26
Overall picture
  • 39 are motivated by mobility
  • 5 groups that are being drawn into deeper use
    thanks to mobile connections
  • Wireless connections prompt them to use the
    internet more and feel better and better about
    its role in their lives
  • Self expression and networking matters to them,
    but some have mixed feelings
  • 61 are tied to stationary media
  • 5 groups that do not feel the pull of mobility
    or anything else drawing them deeper in the
    digital world
  • Some have lots of technology, but it is
    relatively peripheral in their lives
  • They have plateaued in internet use and
    enthusiasm -- or are on the outskirts of digital
    life

27
Motivated by mobility Group 1Digital
collaborators (8 of population)
  • Tech lifestyle attributes
  • With the most tech assets, Digital Collaborators
    use them to work with and share their creations
    with others.
  • The lead the pack in every dimension of our
    analysis assets, actions, attitudes towards
    technology.
  • Always-on broadband and always-present cell
    connection is key to their lives.
  • These veteran users are enthusiastic about how
    ICTs help them connect with others and confident
    in how to manage digital devices and information.

28
Motivated by mobility Group 1Digital
collaborators (8 of population)
  • Demographics
  • Male 56
  • Median age 39
  • Race Diverse
  • Education 61 college
  • Household income 53 make gt 75K
  • Employment status 70 employed FT
  • Community type 52 suburb 36 urb.
  • Funky facts 12 years online
  • 73 married
  • 51 parents minor children

29
Motivated by mobility Group 1Digital
collaborators (8 of population)
  • Important because
  • They are your most consistent, primary users
  • They are early adopters
  • They are most potent influentials they are
    evangelists and their word of mouth really,
    really matters
  • When you want to explore new services, they will
    give you feedback

30
Motivated by mobility Group 2Ambivalent
networkers (7 of population)
  • Tech lifestyle attributes
  • Ambivalent Networkers have folded mobile devices
    into how they run their social lives, whether
    though texting or social networking tools online.
  • They tie for first or take second in all assets
    and actions categories.
  • They also rely on ICTs for entertainment.
  • But they also express worries about connectivity
    and some find that mobile devices are intrusive.
  • Many think it is good to take a break from online
    use.
  • Their keyword about technology might be
    obligation cant afford to be off the grid,
    even though they want to be.

31
Motivated by mobility Group 2Ambivalent
networkers (7 of population)
  • Demographics
  • Male 60
  • Median age 29 (youngest)
  • Race Little more minority than DigCollab.
  • Education 23 college
  • Household income 44 make lt 50K
  • Employment status 64 employed FT
  • Community type 44 suburb 45 urb.
  • Funky facts 30 are students
  • 34 are NOT email users
  • 83 are cell texters

32
Motivated by mobility Group 2Ambivalent
networkers (7 of population)
  • Important because
  • They are tomorrows primary e-patients and
    library-service users and influencers
  • They have seen change in libraries and liked it

33
Motivated by mobility Group 3Media movers (7
of population)
  • Tech lifestyle attributes
  • Media Movers have a wide range of online and
    mobile habits, and they like to find or create an
    information nugget, such as a digital photo, and
    pass it on.
  • These social exchanges are central to this
    groups use of ICTs rather than work-related
    uses.
  • Cyberspace as a path to personal productivity or
    an outlet for creativity is less important.
  • They are not into online content creation the way
    Digital Collaborators are, yet they are big-time
    sharers.

34
Motivated by mobility Group 3Media movers (7
of population)
  • Demographics
  • Male 56
  • Median age 34 (second youngest)
  • Race Diverse
  • Education 32 college (average)
  • Household income 56 make gt 50K
  • Employment status 70 employed FT
  • Community type 55 suburb 30 urb.
  • Funky facts 31 record video on cell
  • 87 own dig. camera
  • 90 online health seekers

35
Motivated by mobility Group 3Media movers (7
of population)
  • Important because
  • They are least intense e-patients, though lots of
    them have sought medical information online
  • They are eager social networkers who pass along
    your material
  • They add to the diversity of your audience

36
Motivated by mobility Group 4Roving nodes (9
of population)
  • Tech lifestyle attributes
  • Roving Nodes are active managers of their social
    and work lives using their mobile device.
  • They get the most out of basic applications with
    their assets such as email or texting and
    find them great for arranging the logistics of
    their lives and enhancing personal productivity.
  • They love email and texting, but are too busy to
    blog or create other content.
  • Think working Little League mother, or
    caregiver for aging parent when you think of
    Roving Nodes

37
Motivated by mobility Group 4Roving nodes (9
of population)
  • Demographics
  • Female 56
  • Median age 39
  • Race Diverse gt Latino
  • Education 44 college (2nd highest)
  • Household income 52 make gt 50K
  • Employment status 68 employed FT
  • Community type 48 suburb 39 urb.
  • Funky facts 100 have cell phones
  • heavy internet use at home and work hard to
    give up
  • say tech gives them control

38
Motivated by mobility Group 4Roving nodes (9
of population)
  • Important because
  • They are kin-keepers and caregivers
  • They will appreciate you if you help them be
    efficient and thorough

39
Motivated by mobility Group 5Mobile newbies
(8 of population)
  • Tech lifestyle attributes
  • This group rates low on tech assets, but its
    members really like their cell phones.
  • Mobile Newbies, many of whom acquired a cell in
    the past year, like how the device helps them be
    more available to others.
  • The act of getting a cell phone was like a
    conversion experience for them in the way it
    opened up the world.
  • They would be hard pressed to give up the cell
    phone. And they express general support for the
    role technology can play in peoples lives even
    though most do NOT use the internet.

40
Motivated by mobility Group 5Mobile newbies
(8 of population)
  • Demographics
  • Female 55
  • Median age 50 (oldest MBM group)
  • Race A bit weighted to minorities
  • Education 72 HS or less
  • Household income 45 make lt40K
  • Employment status 53 employed FT
  • Community type 24 rural
  • Funky facts just 39internet users 46
    use computers
  • none create internet content
  • love new connectedness

41
Motivated by mobility Group 5Mobile newbies
(8 of population)
  • Important because
  • They are very unlikely to be e-patients and quite
    unaware of the wealth of material available
    online
  • They greatly diversify your audience
  • They are traditionally under-served customers

42
Stationary media majority Group 1Desktop
veterans (13 of population)
  • Tech lifestyle attributes
  • This group of older, veteran online users is
    content to use a high-speed connection and a
    desktop computer to explore the internet and stay
    in touch with friends.
  • They are happy to be connected with they are
    stationary and sitting. So, they place their cell
    phone and mobile applications in the background.
  • For them, online life hit its zenith about 3-5
    years ago when they first got broadband
    connections.
  • And their 2004 cell phone still serves its
    primary purpose for them making phone calls.

43
Stationary media majority Group 1Desktop
veterans (13 of population)
  • Demographics
  • Male 55
  • Median age 46
  • Race Skews white
  • Education 41 college (3rd highest)
  • Household income 32 make gt75K
  • Employment status 56 employed FT
  • Community type 52 sub. 30 urb.
  • Funky facts just 77 have cells
  • int. user 10.5 years
  • heavy int. users at home and work
  • average content creators

44
Stationary media majority Group 1Desktop
veterans (13 of population)
  • Important because
  • They are relatively intense e-patients
  • They already know about the things you do
  • They are influencers, too

45
Stationary media majority Group 2Drifting
surfers (14 of population)
  • Tech lifestyle attributes
  • Many have the requisite tech assets, such as
    broadband or a cell phone, but Drifting Surfers
    are infrequent online users.
  • They also are not big fans of mobile
    connectivity.
  • When they use technology, it is for basic
    information gathering.
  • It wouldnt bother the typical Drifting Surfer to
    give up the internet or cell phone.
  • Likely to be secondary user of technology in
    household.

46
Stationary media majority Group 2Drifting
surfers (14 of population)
  • Demographics
  • Female 56
  • Median age 42
  • Race Diverse
  • Education 33 college 33 HS
  • Household income 46 make gt50K
  • Employment status 66 employed FT
  • Community type 46 sub. 35 urb.
  • Funky facts 85 have home broadbd 86
    have cells
  • below aver. tech user
  • tech doesnt help much
    46good to take break

47
Stationary media majority Group 2Drifting
surfers (14 of population)
  • Important because
  • They are not aware of the material that is
    available online and through other resources
  • They will need you some day

48
Stationary media majority Group 3Information
encumbered (10 of population)
  • Tech lifestyle attributes
  • Most people in this group suffer from information
    overload and think taking time off from the
    internet is a good thing.
  • Their attitudes about the role of technology in
    the world have worsened since 2006 and they see
    no great benefits from technology in their
    personal lives.
  • The Information Encumbered are firmly rooted in
    old media to get information and communicate.

49
Stationary media majority Group 3Information
encumbered (10 of population)
  • Demographics
  • Male 67 (highest)
  • Median age 53
  • Race Skews white
  • Education 33 college 37 HS
  • Household income 42 make lt40K
  • Employment status 40 employed FT
  • Community type 48 urb 20 rural
  • Funky facts 99 are int. users
  • 75 are cell users
  • only 52 online typ. day 52 feel overloaded
  • 62 need help new gad.

50
Stationary media majority Group 3Information
encumbered (10 of population)
  • Important because
  • They are the alienated and society functions
    better with their participation and involvement

51
Stationary media majority Group 4Tech
indifferent (10 of population)
  • Tech lifestyle attributes
  • Members of this group are not heavy internet
    users.
  • Although most have cell phones, they dont like
    their intrusiveness.
  • The Indifferent could easily do without modern
    gadgets and services. They are too much trouble
    with too little payoff.

52
Stationary media majority Group 4Tech
indifferent (10 of population)
  • Demographics
  • Female 55
  • Median age 59 (2nd oldest)
  • Race Diverse (little higher Af-Am)
  • Education 73 HS or less
  • Household income 59 make lt50K
  • Employment status 34 employed FT
  • Community type 26 rural
  • Funky facts just 39 are int. users
  • 46 computer users but 86 are cell users
  • least likely users of everything

53
Stationary media majority Group 4Tech
indifferent (10 of population)
  • Important because
  • They are on the far side of the digital divide
    even though they have some relationship to
    technology
  • Very few e-patients

54
Stationary media majority Group 5Off the net
(14 of population)
  • Tech lifestyle attributes
  • Members of this group have neither cell phones
    nor online access, and tend to be older and
    low-income.
  • Some have experience with ICTs. They used to have
    online access and as many as one in five used to
    have a cell phone.
  • But it broke, or didnt provide much enhancement
    to their worlds, so they did not return to using
    the technology.

55
Stationary media majority Group 5Off the net
(14 of population)
  • Demographics
  • Female 57 (highest)
  • Median age 67 (oldest)
  • Race Skews to minorities
  • Education 80 HS or less
  • Household income 38 make lt20K
  • Employment status 17 employed FT
  • Community type 30 rural
  • Funky facts just 16 have desktop or
    laptop
  • they see no lifestyle improvements with
    technology

56
Stationary media majority Group 5Off the net
(14 of population)
  • Important because
  • These are often the people who most need medical
    information
  • Their caregivers need you, too

57
8 tips on how to be a node in a social network
  • Think like a friend
  • Remember your strengths and play to them by being
    an expert, a filter, and a recommender (linker)
  • Be aware that your audience is bigger than the
    available evidence provides lurkers and future
    arrivals are part of the mix
  • Look for opportunities to provide support to
    users and chances to build communities with your
    material

58
8 tips on how to be a node in a social network
  • Help people cope with technology
  • Participate in the Web 2.0 world
  • Embrace the move towards mobility, constant
    connectivity, perpetual contact
  • This changes the realities of time and space and
    presence
  • Ask for help/feedback

59
Thank you!
  • Lee Rainie
  • Director
  • Pew Internet American Life Project
  • 1615 L Street NW
  • Suite 700
  • Washington, DC 20036
  • Email Lrainie_at_pewinternet.org
  • Twitter http//twitter.com/lrainie
  • 202-419-4500
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