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New Opportunities The new Secondary Curriculum: A curriculum for the future

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Title: New Opportunities The new Secondary Curriculum: A curriculum for the future


1
New Opportunities The new Secondary Curriculum A
curriculum for the future
2
Background to the review
  • In March 2005, QCA was remitted to review the
    key stage 3 curriculum to enable schools to meet
    better students individual needs and strengths.
    The main aims of the revision were
  • to reduce congestion by identifying areas of
    duplication across subjects
  • to reduce the level of prescription and encourage
    curriculum flexibility and innovation
  • to identify and embed broader curriculum issues
  • to improve cohesion across the curriculum
  • to consider the changes at KS4 and the impact
    these will have on KS3 including the Functional
    Skills Standards for English, mathematics and ICT.

3
  • A curriculum
  • for the 21st century
  • adaptable
  • challenging
  • inspiring

for our changing society economy technology
4
  • A curriculum that enables learners to
  • linger longer
  • dig deeper
  • cross boundaries

to secure learning to follow through to recap
reach conceptual understanding go beneath the
surface
link subjects go beyond the school gates
5
So whats changed?
  • An increased focus on whole curriculum design
    underpinned by Aims
  • Increased flexibility less prescription but
    focus on key concepts and processes in subjects.
  • More room for personalisation and locally
    determined curriculum
  • More emphasis on skills functional and wider
    skills for learning and life
  • More emphasis on personal development and ECM
  • More opportunities for coherence and relevance -
    linking learning to life outside school, making
    connections between subjects, cross-curricular
    themes and dimensions
  • A real opportunity for renewal and
    re-invigoration (BSF, Diplomas)

6
Time Line
  • 30th September 2006 submission of draft
    programmes of study to the Secretary of
    State.
  • 20th December 2006 submission of final draft
    programmes of study to the Secretary of
    State.
  • 5th February 2007 formal consultation on new
    programmes of study (12 weeks)
  • June 2007 final programmes of study to the
    Secretary of State
  • July 12 2007 Launch of new programmes of study
  • September 2007 programmes of study issued to
    schools
  • September 2008 first teaching of new programmes
    of study

7
The Aims
  • The curriculum aims to enable all young people
    to become
  • successful learners who enjoy learning, make
    progress and achieve
  • confident individuals who are able to live safe,
    healthy and fulfilling lives
  • responsible citizens who make a positive
    contribution to society

8
Three key questions
The curriculum aims to enable all young people to
become
1 WHAT are we trying to achieve?
Successful learners who enjoy learning, make
progress and achieve
Responsible citizens who make a positive
contribution to society
Confident individuals who are able to lead safe
and healthy lives
Curriculum aims
Every child matters outcomes
Enjoying and achieving Safety
Health Contributing positively
Achieving economic wellbeing
Knowledge and understanding eg, big ideas that
shape the world
Skills eg, literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal,
learning and thinking skills
Attitudes and attributes eg, determined,
adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising
Focus for learning
The curriculum as an entire planned learning
experience underpinned by a broad set of common
values and purposes
Lessons
Out of school
Extended hours
Routines
Events
Locations
Environment
Components
2 HOW do we organise learning?
Learning approaches
Including all learners
Opportunities for learner choice and
personalisation
Using a range of audiences and purposes
Taking risks
Matching time to learning need, eg, deep,
immersive and regular frequent learning
Community and business links
Building on learning beyond the school
In tune with human development
A range of approaches, including enquiry, active
learning, practical and constructive
spiritual moral social cultural personal
development, health and well-being active
citizenship and community action enterprise
and entrepreneurship cultural diversity,
identity and belonging technology and the
media global dimension and sustainability
Dimensions
Personal, social and emotional development
Communication, language and literacy
Mathematical development
Knowledge and understanding of the world
Physical development
Creative development
3-5
National curriculum
A D
Ma
Ci
D T
En
Ge
Hi
ICT
Sc
PSHE
PE
Mu
MFL
RE
CEG
5-16
Assessment fit for purpose To make learning and
teaching more effective so that learners
understand quality and how to improve
3 HOW WELL are we achieving our aims?
Uses error positively
Includes individual target setting
Includes testing
Includes peer- and self- evaluation
Includes peer- and self-assessment
Gives advice on what and how to improve
Has understood, shared and negotiated success
criteria
Has clear learning intentions shared with pupils
Builds a more open relationship between teacher
and learner
Celebrates success against agreed criteria
Assessment
Securing
Further involvement in education, employment or
training
Attainment and improved standards
Behaviour and attendance
Civic participation
Healthy lifestyle choices
Accountability measures
9
(No Transcript)
10
Skills for life and work
  • independent enquirers,
  • creative thinkers,
  • team workers,
  • self-managers,
  • effective participators,
  • reflective learners

11
The curriculum aims to enable all young people to
become
Successful learners who enjoy learning, make
progress and achieve
Responsible citizens who make a positive
contribution to society
Confident individuals who are able to lead safe
and healthy lives
Curriculum aims
Every child matters outcomes
Enjoying and achieving Safety
Health Contributing positively
Achieving economic wellbeing
Knowledge and understanding eg, big ideas that
shape the world
Skills eg, literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal,
learning and thinking skills
Attitudes and attributes eg, determined,
adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising
Focus for learning
12
Discussion point
  • How does the framework for designing a curriculum
    affect the way you could conceive your PE
    curriculum?
  • How does PE in your school contribute to your
    pupils becoming successful, responsible and
    confident individuals?

13
Three key questions
The curriculum aims to enable all young people to
become
1 WHAT are we trying to achieve?
Successful learners who enjoy learning, make
progress and achieve
Responsible citizens who make a positive
contribution to society
Confident individuals who are able to lead safe
and healthy lives
Curriculum aims
Every child matters outcomes
Enjoying and achieving Safety
Health Contributing positively
Achieving economic wellbeing
Knowledge and understanding eg, big ideas that
shape the world
Skills eg, literacy, numeracy, ICT, personal,
learning and thinking skills
Attitudes and attributes eg, determined,
adaptable, confident, risk-taking, enterprising
Focus for learning
The curriculum as an entire planned learning
experience underpinned by a broad set of common
values and purposes
Lessons
Out of school
Extended hours
Routines
Events
Locations
Environment
Components
2 HOW do we organise learning?
Learning approaches
Including all learners
Opportunities for learner choice and
personalisation
Using a range of audiences and purposes
Taking risks
Matching time to learning need, eg, deep,
immersive and regular frequent learning
Community and business links
Building on learning beyond the school
In tune with human development
A range of approaches, including enquiry, active
learning, practical and constructive
spiritual moral social cultural personal
development, health and well-being active
citizenship and community action enterprise
and entrepreneurship cultural diversity,
identity and belonging technology and the
media global dimension and sustainability
Dimensions
Personal, social and emotional development
Communication, language and literacy
Mathematical development
Knowledge and understanding of the world
Physical development
Creative development
3-5
National curriculum
A D
Ma
Ci
D T
En
Ge
Hi
ICT
Sc
PSHE
PE
Mu
MFL
RE
CEG
5-16
Assessment fit for purpose To make learning and
teaching more effective so that learners
understand quality and how to improve
3 HOW WELL are we achieving our aims?
Uses error positively
Includes individual target setting
Includes testing
Includes peer- and self- evaluation
Includes peer- and self-assessment
Gives advice on what and how to improve
Has understood, shared and negotiated success
criteria
Has clear learning intentions shared with pupils
Builds a more open relationship between teacher
and learner
Celebrates success against agreed criteria
Assessment
Securing
Further involvement in education, employment or
training
Attainment and improved standards
Behaviour and attendance
Civic participation
Healthy lifestyle choices
Accountability measures
14
  • How does the framework for designing a curriculum
    affect the way you could conceive your PE
    curriculum?
  • How does PE in your school contribute to your
    pupils becoming successful, responsible and
    confident individuals?

15
The new programme of study for PE
16
A fresh look at the curriculum
A new look at Subjects
  • Importance statement
  • Why the subject matters and how it can contribute
    to the aims
  • Key concepts
  • Identifies the big ideas that underpin the
    subject
  • Key processes
  • Identifies the essential skills of the subject
  • Range and content
  • Outlines the breadth of subject matter from which
    teachers should draw to develop
  • key concepts and skills
  • Curriculum opportunities
  • Identifies opportunities to enhance and enrich
    learning links to wider curriculum

Less prescribed content but an increased focus on
subject discipline… the key ideas and skills that
underpin a subject.
17
The importance statement
  • Why physical education is important to young
    learners?
  • Why it is an essential part of the whole
    curriculum?

18
Outcomes of high-quality PE and Sport
  • Young people who
  • show commitment
  • know and understand what to do
  • lead healthy, active lifestyles
  • are confident
  • have skills and control
  • are willing to take part in different types of
    activity
  • are good at thinking and decision making
  • have a desire to improve
  • have stamina, suppleness and strength
  • enjoy PE and sport

19
Physical Education Key Concepts
  • What are the key concepts that underpin the
    physical education of learners?
  • Physical competence
  • Performance
  • Creativity
  • Balanced healthy lifestyles

20
Key processes
  • What are the key processes that ensure learning
    and progress in physical education?
  • What do learners have to know and be able to do
    to succeed in physical education?

21
Physical Education Key Processes
  • Acquiring skills
  • Selecting and applying them
  • Evaluating and improving
  • Have a knowledge of fitness and health

22
Physical Education Key Processes
  • Acquiring skills
  • Selecting and applying them
  • Evaluating and improving
  • Body and mind readiness

23
Physical Education Key Processes
  • Healthy lifestyles

24
Range and content
  • What are the essential experiences learners need
    in order to become physically educated?
  • What are the different contexts in which learners
    should be able to apply their knowledge and
    skills?

25
Curriculum opportunities
  • Where and how should learners be able to learn in
    order to strengthen and deepen their learning?
  • Where are the places and settings in which their
    learning becomes more relevant and personal?

26
Review
  • From a National Curriculum to a local curriculum

27
Your curriculum
  • what would you like your curriculum to become?
  • how will it become a curriculum that your
    learners like?
  • what will be your priorities?
  • what approaches will help your learners to
    achieve these priorities?
  • what will you have to do to bring the curriculum
    about?

28
The ten high-quality outcomes for PESS
  • We want our young people to…
  • be committed to PE, sport and dance
  • know and understand what they are trying to
    achieve
  • understand why PE, sport and dance are important
    for healthy, active lifestyles
  • have the confidence to get involved
  • develop skills and control
  • get involved willingly in competitive, creative
    and challenge type activities
  • think and make decisions for themselves
  • have the desire to improve and achieve
  • have the stamina, strength and suppleness
  • enjoy PE, sport and dance

29
Three key questions
  • What are we trying to achieve through the
    curriculum?
  • How do we best organise learning to achieve these
    aims?
  • How well is it working (and improving) ?

30
Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes (David Bowie, 1970)
31
Questions, questions?
  • ? What sort of education do we want to see in
    future?
  • ? What sorts of learning relationships do we want
    to foster?
  • ? What competencies do we want learners to
    develop?
  • What tools and resources are available to us to
    support learning?
  • What learning outcomes do we want to achieve?
  • ? What buildings do we want?
  • How many classrooms do we need?
  • How many playing fields do we need?
  • What size pool, do we need?
  • Default to BB98

Re-Imagining Learning Spaces - Futurelab, 2006
32
Making the most of new opportunities
  • Designing compelling learning experiences

33
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34
Activity 2 How do we organise learning?
  • If…then
  • If you want learners to develop healthy lifestyle
    choices…
  • Then you must provide
  • opportunities to develop knowledge and
    understanding about…
  • opportunities to develop skills in…
  • essential learning experiences that will develop
    their desire and inclination to live healthy
    active lifestyles

  • What are these?

35
How do your organise the curriculum?
  • Example
  • In order to help learners to make good healthy
    lifestyle choices, what are good examples of the
    deep, rich learning opportunities a school could
    provide?
  • Example of a compelling learning experience
  • Learners run an international restaurant

36
Example of a rich learning opportunity
people
time
half term focus in lessons 6 Fridays
Tutors, visiting chef, MFL, DT departments
place
Canteen, FE college, dining area
quality and standards
International restaurant
Feedback from diners, PLTS, peer and self
assessment
resources
Kitchen equipment, foreign language recipe cards
internet
Instruction, investigation, active experience
MFL, DT, Business and enterprise, ICT, English
TL
links
37
Task
  • devise a compelling learning experience in PE
    that would focus on the development of
  • independent enquirers
  • creative thinkers
  • physical competence
  • challenge racism
  • healthy active lifestyles for a group of year 7
    pupils
  • what are the outcomes you want to see for this
    group of year 7 pupils?
  • identify how you would make the best use of
  • time,
  • staffing,
  • space and facilities,
  • learning resources
  • approaches to teaching, learning and assessment
  • links across the curriculum

38
Developing independent enquirers
time
people
place
Write a description of a rich learning opportunity
quality and standards
resources
TL approaches
cross-curricular links
39
  • Essential Learning experiences
  • In order to design compelling learning
    experiences that will contribute to our schools
    aims we commit to 6 thematic weeks a year these
    will be problem based, require teamwork and make
    links across subjects to issues in the real
    world.
  • In Year 7, this will include…

A formal programme of timetabled lessons
incorporate the themes and build skills towards a
successful implementation of the thematic
weeks.
40
  • Dear Timetabler
  • The best way that the Geography department can
    design compelling learning experiences that will
    contribute to our schools aims is as follows.
  • 8 X 2 hour sessions for specialist teaching 16
    hours.
  • 2 days of field work (one summer, one winter)
    both followed by half-day de-briefing sessions
    12 hours.
  • A themed week (in collaboration with Citizenship,
    DT and English team to engage in a community
    based make-over activity)
  • 10 X 30 minute skill-builder sessions 5 hrs
    (including orienteering day with PE)
  • 5 X 20 minute assemblies to link current affairs
    with geography global citizenship with
    sustainability
  • Yours Phil Aday, Humanities

41
  • The curriculum should be treasured. There should
    be real pride in our curriculum the learning
    that the nation has decided to put before its
    young. Teachers, parents, employers, the media
    and the public should all see the curriculum as
    something to embrace, support and celebrate. Most
    of all, young people should relish the
    opportunity for discovery and achievement that
    the curriculum offers.

42
What support will be available in the year ahead?
  • In the coming year there will coordinated support
    from major agencies
  • Support for school leaders NCSL
  • Leaders and whole curriculum planning SSAT
  • Subject support SNS/CfBT
  • On-going guidance, models and case studies QCA
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