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The Integrated Coral Observing Network ICON formerly CREWS

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Title: The Integrated Coral Observing Network ICON formerly CREWS


1
The Integrated Coral Observing Network
(ICON) (formerly CREWS)
Presented at the Third GLEON and CREON
Workshop September 30 October 4, 2006 Hsinchu,
(Yuang-Yang Lake, Kenting), Taiwan
Dr. Jim Hendee, and Dr. Tsung-Hung
Peng NOAA/OAR/AOML Jim.Hendee_at_noaa.gov
2
ICON Vision Statement Our vision is to serve as
a model for all of NOAA in establishing the
highest quality in situ coral reef monitoring
network, and to provide the integration of near
real-time in situ, satellite, radar and other
data for ecological forecasting in coral reef
ecosystems.
3
  • Goals
  • For the next few years, the ICON Program will be
    focusing upon
  • Integrating data from diverse independent
    sources
  • Ensuring consistency with NOAA's Integrated
    Ocean Observing System (IOOS), and the Coral Reef
    Ecosystem Integrated Observing System (CREIOS)
  • Forging international partnerships
  • Facilitating development and transition to
    operations of promising relevant in situ
    instrumentation

4
An ICON (formerly CREWS) station is a stable
pylon-style coral monitoring platform that
provides the opportunity to position instruments
of various sizes, shapes and configurations at
various heights above the ocean, and various
depths throughout the water column.
5
Atmospheric Sensors
  • Air Temperature
  • Wind Speed
  • Wind Direction
  • Barometric Pressure
  • Humidity
  • Precipitation
  • Light
  • Photosynthetically Available Radiation (PAR)
  • Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR)

6
Oceanographic Sensors
  • Standard Suite (shallow and near bottom)
  • Sea Temperature
  • Salinity
  • Light (UV, PAR)
  • Additional Sensors
  • pCO2 (ocean acidification)
  • Pulse Amplitude Modulating (PAM) Fluorometry
    (real-time monitoring of stress response)

7
1
2
3
1. Power comes from station to central
canister. 2. Divers position PAM-fluoro
stand. 3. Diver positions PAM-fluoro head
precisely.
8
Telemetered Instrument Array (TIA)
  • Four-instrument package CTD, light sensor,
    transmissometer, ADCP
  • Acoustic modems transmit data streams
    underwater
  • TIA can be placed up to a mile away from the
    pylon
  • Allows coverage of many areas at a coral reef
    ecosystem
  • Data streams merge at the pylon before
    transmission (satellite or radio)
  • Final data stream managed by expert system and
    broadcast to Web or monitor at lab

9
Existing stations
  • Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas (4)
  • Data stream since May, 2001
  • St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands
  • Data stream since June, 2002
  • La Parguera, Puerto Rico
  • Data stream since January, 2006

10
International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI)
stations in the works
  • Heron Island, Queensland, Australia
  • Site survey completed November, 2005
  • Discovery Bay, Jamaica
  • Bottom plate installed February 27th
  • Puerto Morelos, Mexico
  • Site survey week of July 10, 2006
  • Little Cayman, Cayman Islands
  • Site survey week of June 5, 2006
  • Antigua, Lesser Antilles
  • Co-PI with Dr. Rod Zika of RSMAS

11
  • Site selection
  • Construction and deployment
  • Information architecture
  • How the CREWS expert system works
  • Research applications
  • Telemetered Instrument Array

12
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13
How ICON helps the IOOS and CREIOS efforts
  • G2 (Gensym) Software (HPCC funded application)
  • More powerful expert system (used by FBI, CIA,
    NSA, DOD, Fortune 500, etc.) than use previously.
  • Graphics and Web-oriented output
  • Provides off-the-shelf capabilities for near
    real-time data integration (bridges)
  • Integration of pylon/buoy, satellite, radar,
    biological, other data sources
  • OPeNDAP bridge possible (new ocean data
    standard)
  • Unveiling of application at the 59th annual
    Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute meeting in
    Belize, November 6 10, 2006

14
Ecological forecasts predict the impacts of
physical, chemical, biological, and human-induced
change on ecosystems and their components.
15
Prediction is tricky, especially about the
future. Yogi
Berra
16
Some ICON-relevant ecological forecasts
(existing or planned for development)
  • Coral bleaching (high sea temperatures high
    irradiation)
  • Coral disease (high nutrients high
    temperatures)
  • Spawning events (fish, coral and other
    invertebrates)
  • Predicting larval transport and survival
  • Rainfall and run-off events ( gt blooms,
    sedimentation)
  • etc. (research models drive sensor deployment
    and forecasts)

17
The new ICON Web interface is integrating data
from AOML/ICON, SEAKEYS, AIMS, and NMFS/CREI
stations, satellite data, radar data, and other
resources, using G2, and will still issue
ecological forecasts, as before, providing for
greatly increased modeling power. G2 can also be
used for scheduling (good for logistics), and
disaster management, which will make it of use to
AOMLs Hurricane Research Division, and hopefully
other organizations.
18
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19
User Login different access privileges for
other menu choices. Station Home Details, info
updates, links to maps, Landsat and other
images. Sensors Metadata, calibration info,
updates. Biology Latest monitoring data, links
to more info. Data Specific data
requests. Graphs Wealth of x/y, scatter and
other plots, of all variables. Ecological
Forecasts Latest bleaching, upwelling, and
other alerts.
20
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21
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23
Our first prototype expert system integrated
satellite and in situ SEAKEYS data for Molasses
Reef. This serves as a surface-truth feedback
for satellite algorithms. Output comes as email
alerts.
Molasses Reef Satellite/In Situ Report for
05/24/2006 For 05/21/2006 NOAA12 satellite
period local sunset (2211 hrs GMT) NOAA12
satellite SST 27.78 MLRF1 in situ
period all-day MLRF1 in situ SST
26.8 (average) ---- For 05/19/2006 noaa15
satellite period local sunset (2220 hrs
GMT) noaa15 satellite SST 27.1824 MLRF1
in situ period daylight-hours MLRF1 in
situ SST 25.7 (average)
24
Example ICON Ecological Forecast (utilizing
integrated data sources SEAKEYS station, USF
Satellite chlorophyll data)
Upwelling Alert for 05/24/2006
Conditions possibly favorable for upwelling
MID-DAY on 05/21/2006, because tmodis-c
satellite chlor_a_2 was gt 1.0 (about 1.152),
and in situ sea temperature was lt 22 (about
21.9), and in situ wind direction was ENE-ESE
(about 92.0) ---- Details for Molasses Reef on
05/21/2006 tmodis-c satellite period local
MID-DAY (1553 hrs GMT) tmodis-c satellite chlor
local 1.152 MLRF1 in situ sea1m 26.8
(AVERAGE) during ALL-DAY day 141 MLRF1 in situ
windDir 92.0 (ENE-ESE) during MID-DAY day 141
25
If you happen to be in the neighborhoodWell be
showcasing our new ICON application at the 59th
Annual Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute
meeting in Belize, November 6-11,
2006. http//www.gcfi.org
See you there!
For more information on the ICON Program, please
contact Jim Hendee jim.hendee_at_noaa.gov
26
Integrated Coral Observing Network
27
Whats the diff? Buoys or pylons?
Some conclusions a) Costs for basics stations
about the same, b) buoys are good for very remote
regions and deeper reefs, c) pylons good for lots
of instruments above and below, real-time data
feed, and wide-area ecosystem (TIA) monitoring,
d) locally accessible buoys or pylons produce
better data (quicker access for
trouble-shooting), e) pylons easier to maintain
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