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Disease Reduction and Control

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Management practices that decrease the chance of bringing an ... Milking hygiene (proper teat dipping, milk new additions last) . What Can New Cattle Bring In? ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Disease Reduction and Control


1
Disease Reduction and Control
  • New Hope Veterinary Clinic February, 2008

2
(No Transcript)
3
Biosecurity
  • Management practices that decrease the chance of
    bringing an infectious disease onto your farm

4
Biosecurity
5
Potential Biosecurity Breaches
  • Cattle from other premises
  • Feedstuffs
  • Vehicles
  • People
  • Water .

6
Biocontainment
  • Management practices that slow the spread of
    infectious disease on your farm

7
Biocontainment
8
Potential Biocontainment Breaches
  • Facilities design
  • Lack of isolation area
  • Feeding waste milk
  • Feeding colostrum from untested cows
  • Newborn calves mixed with older calves/cows
  • Feeding leftover feed
  • Hospital pens Maternity pens
  • Feed and water
  • Manure .

9
Why Are Biosecurity Biocontainment Important?
  • Protect animal health
  • Protect your investment
  • Protect our food supply and human health
  • Zoonotic diseases E coli, Salmonella,
    Cryptosporidium, Brucellosis, Tuberculosis,
    Johnes/Crohns Disease?

10
Why Are Biosecurity Biocontainment Important in
2008?
  • Consider media and popular diseases in the news
  • Foot and Mouth Disease
  • Mad Cow Disease (BSE)
  • Tuberculosis
  • Avian Influenza
  • We live in a world economy
  • More animal movement
  • Foreign market expectations/requirement .

11
What is a closed herd?
  • Never buy/board animals
  • Animals that leave herd do not return
  • No shared pasture fence lines with neighbor
    pasture/livestock
  • Cattle not transported by third party .

12
Low Risk Level
  • True closed herd
  • Never buy/board animals
  • Animals that leave herd do not return
  • No shared pasture fence lines with neighbor
    pasture/livestock
  • Cattle not transported by third party
  • No animals ever introduced, no animals leaving
    farm ever return
  • Some diseases are still present (carrier animals,
    opportunistic germs, etc.)
    .

13
Moderate Risk Level
  • Closed herd, but
  • Potential for purchases from well-known source
  • Show cattle in herd leave and return
  • Plan for potential diseases .

14
High Risk Level
  • Regular purchases of livestock of any age
  • Purchase from unknown sources (auctions, sale
    barn)
  • Potential for any and all diseases to enter herd
    (contagious mastitis, pneumonia, hairy warts,
    abortions, pinkeye, scours) .

15
New Hope Veterinary ClinicJohnes Testing
Results 2005
16
Biosecurity Basics
  • Control human access
  • Parking/vehicles limited, clean
  • Signs limiting access
  • Protective clothing/boots
  • Control animal contact with other animals
  • Quarantine new animals
  • Test new animals
  • Vaccinate new animals .

17
Reducing Risk / Preventing Introduction of
Diseases
  • Know source of cattle
  • Non-infected or known health status
  • Effective vaccination program
  • Not mixed with other animals before sale
  • Purchase open heifers
  • Decrease contact with other animals (deer, dogs)
  • Know transport
  • Use your own vehicle if possible cleaned before
    and after .

18
Reducing Risk / Preventing Introduction of
Diseases - Introducing New Animals
  • 30 day quarantine (feed, water, grooming)
  • 2007 20 of U.S. herds quarantined new
    additions
  • Vaccinations during quarantine period
  • 2007 50 of U.S. herds required vaccination of
    new additions
  • Test new animals prior to commingling with herd
  • 2007 - 25 of U.S. herds required testing of new
    additions
  • Foot bath
  • Milking hygiene (proper teat dipping, milk new
    additions last)
    .

19
What Can New Cattle Bring In?
  • BVD
  • Johnes Disease (Mycobacterium paratuberculosis)
  • Lepto Hardjo
  • BLV (Bovine Leukosis)
  • Hairy Heel Warts
  • Contagious mastitis (Staph aureus, Strep ag,
    Mycoplasma)
  • Salmonella
  • Tuberculosis
  • Brucellosis
    .

20
What diseases can we test for in new additions?
  • BVD blood test, ear notch
  • Johnes blood test, fecal culture
  • Lepto hardjo no test
  • BLV blood test
  • Hairy heel wart no test, observation
  • Contagious mastitis culture animal or have bulk
    tank culture of purchased herd
  • Salmonella culture???
  • Tuberculosis skin test
  • Brucellosis blood test
    .

21
Decreasing Herd Exposure(Biocontainment)
  • Isolate sick and diseased cattle with unusual
    signs
  • Necropsy unexpected deaths
  • Avoid calf exposure to older cattle
  • Unweaned calves are the most susceptible animals
    to illness on farms
  • Disinfect as possible (especially calf hutches,
    etc)
  • Decrease manure contamination
    .

22
Improving Resistance in the Herd(Biosecurity
Biocontainment)
  • Decrease environmental stresses
  • CLEAN, DRY, COMFORTABLE
  • Proper/adequate nutrition
  • Proper/timely Colostrum
  • Strategic vaccination program based on risk and
    potential exposure as well as history of problems
    in herd .
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