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ESA Vision 1 Informing Decisions with Ecological Knowledge Bernadette Rabel Jennifer Prell Lindsey Dymond Tom Tonkin

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Title: ESA Vision 1 Informing Decisions with Ecological Knowledge Bernadette Rabel Jennifer Prell Lindsey Dymond Tom Tonkin


1
ESA Vision 1 Informing Decisions with Ecological
Knowledge Bernadette Rabel Jennifer
Prell Lindsey Dymond Tom Tonkin
Prepared for BIO 344 - Ecology at Wilkes
University 1 October 2004
2
Why should society know about ecology?
  • What can happen today can effect population and
    ecosystems in the future.
  • The science can and should play a greatly
    expanded role in ensuring a future in which
    natural systems and the humans they include
    coexist on a more sustainable planet.
  • Society does not realize that as a human race we
    have virtually altered all of the Earths
    ecological systems.

3
Two main areas for informing decisions with
ecological knowledge
  • A. Integrate advances in ecological knowledge
    into policy and management decisions that affect
    ecological sustainability
  • B. Promote a thoughtful public today and educate
    future generations so that the public can use the
    best ecological knowledge when making individual
    choices about sustainability

4
A. Integrate advances in ecological knowledge
into policy and management decision that affect
ecological sustainability
  • The users of ecological knowledge often do not
    understand the full range of information or
    conceptual insights that ecologists might
    provide.
  • Ecology is relatively new discipline, and still
    suffers in some circles from not being recognized
    as a real science.
  • Over the years,ecologists have created a huge
    knowledge base, that they do not know how to
    advertise its availability
  • Information that is presented is not
    comprehendible to nonscientists.

5
Action 1 Establish an international network of
Centers for the Ecological Implementation of
Solutions (CEIS)
  • Ecologists should cultivate relationships with
    more thoughtful reporters and editors because
    others lack interest.
  • By linking groups of scientists together with
    management and decision makers to help figure
    out shared problems such as forest management,
    agriculture, or wetland restoration.
  • The goal is to improve integration of ecological
    knowledge and to inform the direction of
    ecological research

6
Action 2 Build on programs that serve as honest
brokers of information and use rapid response
teams to assist decision makers
  • ESA could initiate partnerships to develop a
    program based in Washington D.C so this way
    ecologists could have an impact on input and
    testimony on legislation.
  • The intent would be to assess and emphasize the
    quality of ecological science underpinning the
    legislation.
  • Having ESA members in Washington would allow
    elected officials to call on the team to rapidly
    provide high quality independent ecological input
    and testimony for legislation.

7
Action 3 Increase the number of ecologists
within the government agencies who make decisions
of others related to ecological sustainability
  • Ecologists employed in positions that require
    frequent interaction with the public will have
    opportunities to educate the public on issues of
    ecological sustainability.
  • Fellowships and internships could be designed
    specifically to place promising early career
    ecologists on congressional staffs and in federal
    agencies.
  • Agency functions that conduct research should
    have an ecological component in helping agencies
    develop position descriptions and advertise
    openings across the ESA membership.

8
B. Foster a thoughtful public today and educate
generations of tomorrow so that the best
ecological knowledge informs individual choices
about sustainability
  • The campaign would seek to increase awareness
    about ecological sustainability and explain the
    sustainability issues affecting the quality of
    peoples lives and those of future generations
  • People will also learn that the concerns about
    sustainability include much more than the
    charismatic mega issues such as climate change
    and species extinction
  • The next fifty years will be a period of great
    change in ecosystems worldwide

9
Action 4Develop a major public information
campaign to bring issues of ecological
sustainability before the public
  • Parts of the campaign issues of broad public
    concern and help audiences understand the
    scientific basis for solving problems of
    ecological sustainability
  • National awareness of what ecological
    sustainability is and how each citizen is
    connected will require a coordinated and
    prolonged campaign of internet, TV, and radio
  • Ex commercials during the super bowl, newspaper
    or news on the radio and TV, pop-ups

10
Action 5Work with diverse public, nonprofit, and
religious organizations to better integrate
ecological knowledge into relevant outreach and
public campaigns
  • The ESA can encourage the integration of
    contemporary and rigorous ecological knowledge
    into this movement by providing speakers on
    ecological issues of local and national
    significance.
  • The ESA could facilitate the involvement of
    ecologists by building working relationships
    between the ESA governing board and then
    matchmaking between each organizations needs
    and expertise from across the ESA

11
Action 6 Establish internationally coordinated
ecology education programs
  • Develop and deliver professional developmental
    programs for K-12 educators related to ecological
    sustainability
  • Expand the TIEE, FIRST, or similar undergraduate
    faculty support and enhancement programs for
    ecology education- with a special focus on
    ecological sustainability
  • Analyze and participate in curriculum standards
    and textbook development for ecology in K-12 and
    undergrad education
  • Increase diversity among ecology educators
    nationally and internationally
  • Establish a Web-based e-library that provides
    up-to-date access to advances in research and
    education on ecological sustainability.

12
Action 7 Work with the United Nations to declare
an International Decade of Ecology Education as
part of the Decade of Education for sustainable
development
  • Organize and implement a series of Ecology
    Education Conferences, bringing together
    professional science and education societies to
    identify advances, gaps, and frontiers in
    education related to ecological sustainability
  • Publish and widely disseminate proceedings from
    the education conferences.

13
Why we should care
  • Deforestation
  • Global Warming
  • Running out of natural resources
  • Water Contamination
  • Air Pollution

14
Deforestation
  • Carbon Cycle
  • From 1850 to 1990, 122 billion tons of carbon
    released due to deforestation
  • Less capacity to hold water and transpire it back
    to the atmosphere
  • Biodiversity

15
Natural Resources
  • Fossil Fuels are non-renewable
  • Fossil fuels are used to fuel cars, make plastic
    even used to recycle.
  • Burning fossil fuels is hazardous to humans
    health and to the environment.
  • Releases 6 billion metric tons of carbon into air
    every year

16
Global warming
  • largely the result of emissions of carbon dioxide
    and other greenhouse gases from human activities
    including industrial processes, fossil fuel
    combustion, and changes in land use, such as
    deforestation
  • warming will also cause additional sea-level
    rise that will gradually inundate coastal areas,
    changes in precipitation patterns, increased risk
    of droughts and floods, threats to biodiversity,
    and a number of potential challenges for public
    health 

17
Water Contamination
  • 1.5 billion people lack clean drinking water
    worldwide
  • 5 million deaths per year can be attributed to
    waterborne diseases

18
Air Pollution
  • Smog
  • Acid Rain

19
How this affects N.E PA/ Wilkes
  • Wetlands
  • Mine site restoration
  • American Heritage Rivers

20
Wetlands

21
Mine site
22
American Heritage Rivers
23
Summary
  • We must move ecology ahead since it is an
    important role in our existing world and our
    future.
  • If vision is successful, ecologists assist in
    policy decisions and business decisions.
  • our population will better understand our
    dependence on ecological services.
  • Scientists could work together to create more
    useful information systems and research tools.

24
  • The vision is obtainable, but actions need to be
    taken now!
  • The right information must get into the hands of
    the right people and at the right time in a form
    they can understand.
  • The tasks in the vision will not move forward
    unless there is structure that will take us from
    data, to outreach, to application.

25
References
  • http//www.nrcan.gc.ca/mms/scho-ecol/env/resto_e.h
    tm
  • http//www.dailyitem.com/archive/2004/0920/local/s
    tories/10local.htm
  • ESA vision www.ESA.org/ecovisions
  • http//hawky.net/photo/4th_of_july_2001/canoeing/t
    n/the_wetlands.jpg.html
  • http//www.bydesign.com/fossilfuels/links/html/fos
    sil_fuel/fossil_fuel_green.html
  • Krantz, D. and Kifferstein, B. Water Pollution
    and Society
  • Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues In Science.
    http//www.lbl.gov/Education/ELSI/ELSI.html
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