People to People Project Development Presentation for Knowledge Management System - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – People to People Project Development Presentation for Knowledge Management System PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 1bc61c-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

People to People Project Development Presentation for Knowledge Management System

Description:

People to People. Project Development Presentation. for Knowledge ... Myra Herrmann. Denny Lester. OLIT 507 Knowledge Management. November 17, 2005. 2. Topics ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:149
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 95
Provided by: dennisl150
Learn more at: http://www.myraherrmann.info
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: People to People Project Development Presentation for Knowledge Management System


1
People to People Project Development Presentation
for Knowledge Management System
  • Anne Beamon
  • Myra Herrmann
  • Denny Lester
  • OLIT 507 Knowledge Management
  • November 17, 2005

2
Topics
  • Organization Background
  • Knowledge Management (KM) as an Organizational
    Strategy
  • Process of Knowledge Management
  • Technology of Knowledge Management

3
Organization Background
  • People to People International (PTPI) student
    ambassador program
  • Founded in 1956
  • U.S. Presidents serve as Honorary Chairmen
  • Non-profit organization
  • Programs
  • Student Ambassador
  • Sports Ambassador
  • Conferences
  • College Professional

Source People to People Student Ambassador
Programs. Retrieved October 12, 2005 from
http//studentambassadors.org
4
People to People Programs
  • Student Ambassador Program
  • For 5th 12th graders
  • Trips abroad for 2 3 weeks
  • Normally travel with 40 students 4 delegate
    leaders

Source People to People Student Ambassador
Programs. Retrieved October 12, 2005 from
http//studentambassadors.org
5
Background
New Slide
  • Key Staff Members
  • President CEO (executive sponsor)
  • Administrative Support Staff (leadership
    development training)
  • Territory Teams (program management)
  • Chapters (trip planning execution)
  • Delegate Leaders (a.k.a. teacher leaders)
  • Delegates (students)
  • Parents (of delegates)

6
People to People Delegate Leaders
Comment
  • Delegate leaders
  • Teacher volunteers
  • Serve as lead planners and chaperones for student
    delegate trips
  • Participate in face-to-face orientation
    training
  • Website contains program overview, expectations,
    health safety, abuse risk management
    information, applicable forms for delegate
    leaders

Source People to People Student Ambassador
Programs. Retrieved October 12, 2005 from
http//studentambassadors.org
7
Problem Statement
New Slide
  • The People-to-People International student
    ambassador program is not retaining highly
    qualified, experienced delegate leaders

8
KM as an Organizational Strategy
  • Knowledge as a Business Foundation
  • Value of Proposed KM Investment
  • Knowledge the Business Culture

9
Selling Value of KM to People to People
  • Develop present a sound proposal for increasing
    delegate leader qualifications, motivation,
    retention
  • Stress benefits in the proposal
  • Reduce life cycle through collaboration (e.g.,
    just in time education training)
  • Increased knowledge, sharing, reuse of lessons
    learned (war stories) from delegate leader
    experiences
  • Reduction of health, safety, abuse risks to
    travelers
  • Higher quality more motivated delegate leaders
  • More meaningful experiences for students
  • Cost avoidance through increased retention
    reduced training expenses

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
10
Benefits of Capturing Knowledge for Reuse
  • Provides opportunity for individual delegate
    leaders to enhance learning experiences for
    planning executing trips increasing (tacit
    knowledge)
  • Allows delegate leaders share lessons learned
    with other delegate leaders the PTPI staff
    (explicit knowledge)
  • Makes knowledge base available to internal users
    for orientation, training, quality improvement
    (explicit knowledge)
  • Makes knowledge base available to external users
    for attracting new delegate leaders student
    ambassadors personnel development trip
    planning rapid issue incident resolution
    (explicit-to-tacit knowledge)

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
11
How a KM System Works
  • Support Functions
  • Training
  • Evaluation
  • IT Services

Organizational Vision, Values, Strategies,
Goals
Feedback
Inputs
Business Processes
KM Environment
Library
Measures
Fileserver Databases
Content
Repository
Knowledge Social Networks
Security Gate
Queries
Answers
Interfaces Processes
  • Features
  • Storage
  • Publishing
  • Subscription
  • Reuse
  • Collaboration
  • Communication

USERS
Communication
Internet E-Mail Chat Room VTC Production Tools
Collaboration Tools
Virtual Space
Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press. Cross,
R. Prusak, L. (2002). The people who make
organizations go-or stop. Harvard Business
Review, Reprint R0206G, 5-12. Salisbury, M.W.
(2003). Putting theory into practice to build
knowledge management systems. Journal of
Knowledge Management, 7(2), 128-141.
12
Value of Proposed KM Investment
Comment
  • Proposed KM Investments
  • Equipment software for designing, developing,
    implementing, sustaining collaborative and
    repository solutions
  • Collaborative tools that allow for just-in-time
    sharing of information
  • Resource maps for delegate leaders with links to
    other websites for pertinent information
  • Interactive database to lessons learned and best
    practices

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
13
Value of Proposed KM Investment
  • Correlating activities behaviors using KM Value
    Assessment (KVA) Framework to Performance Goals
  • Identify tangible intangible assets associated
    with KM solution
  • Identify work activities behaviors that these
    assets enable enhance, respectively
  • Define performance behavior measures to
    evaluate the value of KM solution
  • Make strategic tactical adjustments to achieve
    desired performance behaviors

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
14
Value of Proposed KM Investment
  • Tangible Assets Supporting KM Solution
  • Funding allocated for KM
  • IT supplies equipment that support KM
  • Facilities that support KM activities

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
15
Value of Proposed KM Investment
  • Intangible Assets Supporting KM Solution
  • PTPI human capital
  • Delegate leader and staff knowledge
  • Creativity
  • Skills
  • Experience
  • Partnerships
  • Reputation
  • Processes
  • Data

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
16
Value of Proposed KM Investment
  • Work activities/measures
  • Personnel management
  • Turnover rate of delegate leaders
  • Average delegate leader years of service to PTPI
  • Average number of delegate leaders in employment
    pool
  • Delegate leader appraisal ratings
  • Training
  • Time required to train delegate leaders (initial
    continuation training)
  • Costs (travel, equipment, supplies)

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
17
Value of Proposed KM Investment
New Slide
  • Work activities/measures
  • Marketing
  • Number program contributors funding
  • Student participation funding
  • Trip Planning Preparation
  • Cycle time for trip planning
  • Cycle time for preparing coordinating necessary
    documentation
  • Safety abuse incident resolution
  • Number frequency of incidents
  • Time required to report resolve incidents

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
18
Value of Proposed KM Investment
Comment
  • Behaviors/measures
  • Collaboration
  • Number and frequency of exchanges using
    collaborative tools
  • Contribution of Knowledge Assets (KAs)
  • Number of contributions by knowledge producers
  • Information Sharing Reuse
  • Number of visits downloads on website
  • Perception of value effectiveness of KM
    solution
  • Rating by knowledge users, producers, mangers
  • Rating by leadership sponsor

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
19
Knowledge Value Analysis
New Slide
Value Chain
Increased Use of Human Capital. Reduced Health,
Safety Abuse Risk, Delegate Leader Retention
Activity Chain
Enhances
Enhanced delegate leader qualifications
motivation
Enables
Work Activities
Behaviors
  • Collaboration
  • Contribution of KAs
  • Information Sharing
  • Feedback on KM
  • system
  • Personnel management
  • (recruiting, retention)
  • Training (life cycle
  • (training costs)
  • Marketing
  • Trip planning prep
  • Safety abuse (incident
  • prevention resolution)

Cost avoidance due to increased retention of
delegate leaders risk reduction, reduction
of knowledge life cycle and more meaningful
experience for students
Increased membership fees due more satisfied
students
Measurement Chain
Increased program fees due to improved quality of
programs
Time and quality
Correlate
Develop and reuse
Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
20
Knowledge the Business Culture
  • Business Strategy Culture
  • Hire retain high-caliber delegate leaders
  • Provide delegate leaders ready access to
    information that supports effective planning and
    execution of trips
  • Capture lessons learned that can be applied to
    improve the student ambassador program
  • Provide the most rewarding experiences for
    delegate leaders, students, the international
    community that participate in PTPI

Source Penuel, B. Cohen, A. (2003). Coming to
the crossroads of knowledge, learning, and
technology integrating knowledge management and
workplace learning. Cambridge The MIT Press.
21
Knowledge the Business Culture
Comment
  • Current Culture
  • Limited opportunity for discovery
  • Limited sharing of lessons learned
  • Limited access to other pertinent information
    sources
  • Minimal visibility of management into delegate
    leader abilities concerns
  • Low retention of delegate leaders
  • Low experience level of delegate leaders
  • Desired Culture
  • Delegate leaders that contribute tacit knowledge
  • Lessons learned contribute to continual growth
    improvement
  • Ready-access to information for trip planning,
    execution, and response to incidents
  • Close linkages relationships between PTPI staff
    delegate leaders
  • Highly motivated and committed delegate leaders
  • High level of retention and delegate leader staff
    continuity

Cultural Gaps
22
Knowledge the Business Culture
  • Closing cultural gaps
  • Raise level of awareness of KM value of
    proposed solution for delegate leaders
  • Invite current delegate leaders to participate in
    design implementation of proposed solution
  • Make information tools available that support
    decision-making, sharing, collaboration
  • Provide rewards incentives for contributing KM
    solutions lessons learned
  • Prepare design a brief plan that includes
    proposed process changes, resource requirements,
    risks to implement, monitor, control,
    evaluate proposed solution
  • Motivate PTPI leadership to endorse sponsor
    proposed solution

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
23
Plan Development Implementation
Adjust Plan
Feedback
Develop Prototype KM Solution
Develop Plan
Assemble Tools Technologies
  • KM Issue Background
  • Objectives
  • Performance Measures
  • Approach
  • Scope of KM Solution
  • Content Areas
  • Knowledge Social Networks
  • Processes
  • Tools Technologies
  • Pre-release Checkout
  • Training
  • Resource Requirements
  • Risks Risk Mitigations
  • Evaluation Feedback

Conduct Pre- Release Checkout
Make Process Modifications
Modify KM Solution
Implement KM Solution
Modify Tools Technologies
Measure Evaluate
Modify Processes
24
Plan Development Implementation
New Slide
  • Phased Approach
  • Phase I
  • Focus on implementing KM tools and processes for
    increasing collaboration between delegate leaders
  • Develop taxonomy and preliminary implementation
    of repository as a jump start and to ensure
    collaboration tools and processes are consistent
  • Phase II
  • Focus on implementing robust repository
  • Refine collaborative tools and approaches based
    on performance and feedback on quality and value

25
Knowledge the Business Culture
  • Monitor Results
  • Calculate measures
  • Compare actual performance effectiveness to
    desired performance effectiveness criteria
    (quantitative data)
  • Obtain information from surveys interviews to
    obtain amplifying information help correlate
    cause effect (qualitative data)
  • Prepare present delegate leaders with
    preliminary results obtain their feedback
  • Provide results recommendations to senior
    leadership/sponsors
  • Perform on-going evaluation make evolutionary
    improvements to processes tools

26
Process of Knowledge Management
Process of Knowledge Management
Capturing Knowledge Assets
Communities of Practice
Implementation Framework
Taxonomies
  • Creating Knowledge
  • Capturing Knowledge
  • Organizing Knowledge
  • Sharing/Using and Reusing Knowledge
  • Risks of KM Program
  • Creating COPs
  • Sustaining COPs
  • Building
  • Structuring
  • Managing
  • Flow of Knowledge
  • Capturing KA
  • Managing KA
  • Exposing KA
  • Decisions about Content

27
Process of Knowledge Management
Process of Knowledge Management
Capturing Knowledge Assets
Communities of Practice
Implementation Framework
Taxonomies
  • Creating Knowledge
  • Capturing Knowledge
  • Organizing Knowledge
  • Sharing/Using and Reusing Knowledge
  • Risks of KM Program
  • Creating COPs
  • Sustaining COPs
  • Building
  • Structuring
  • Managing
  • Flow of Knowledge
  • Capturing KA
  • Managing KA
  • Exposing KA
  • Decisions about Content

28
Process of Knowledge Management
Process of Knowledge Management
Capturing Knowledge Assets
Communities of Practice
Implementation Framework
Taxonomies
  • Creating Knowledge
  • Capturing Knowledge
  • Organizing Knowledge
  • Sharing/Using and Reusing Knowledge
  • Risks of KM Program
  • Creating COPs
  • Sustaining COPs
  • Building
  • Structuring
  • Managing
  • Flow of Knowledge
  • Capturing KA
  • Managing KA
  • Exposing KA
  • Decisions about Content

29
Process of Knowledge Management
Process of Knowledge Management
Capturing Knowledge Assets
Communities of Practice
Implementation Framework
Taxonomies
  • Creating Knowledge
  • Capturing Knowledge
  • Organizing Knowledge
  • Sharing/Using and Reusing Knowledge
  • Risks of KM Program
  • Creating COPs
  • Sustaining COPs
  • Building
  • Structuring
  • Managing
  • Flow of Knowledge
  • Capturing KA
  • Managing KA
  • Exposing KA
  • Decisions about Content

30
Implementation Framework
Corporate Leader Resources
31
Implementation Framework
CoP of Delegate Leaders Field Experiences and
Collaboration
Corporate Leader Resources
32
Implementation Framework
Field Experiences and Collaboration
Corporate Leader Resources
Creating Knowledge Re-tasking and tagging current resource documents Creating templates, forms and best practices Tacit and explicit knowledge and experience
Capturing Knowledge Uploading documents Identify relevant websites with pertinent information Leaders posting their discoveries and experiences
Organizing Knowledge Tagging documents and templates to be consistent with the resource mapping Tagging and categorizing postings Validating postings
Sharing/Using/ Reusing Knowledge Accessible and searchable from corporate website and interactive database Accessible and searchable from corporate website and/or portal
Risks of KM Initial overhead and continuing maintenance without reuse Lack of shared vision and/or understanding of personal benefit Lack of commitment and resources Perception of additional work
33
Implementation Framework
Field Experiences and Collaboration
Corporate Leader Resources
Creating Knowledge Re-tasking and tagging current resource documents Creating templates, forms and best practices Tacit and explicit knowledge and experience
Capturing Knowledge Uploading documents Identify relevant websites with pertinent information Leaders posting their discoveries and experiences
Organizing Knowledge Tagging documents and templates to be consistent with the resource mapping Tagging and categorizing postings Validating postings
Sharing/Using/ Reusing Knowledge Accessible and searchable from corporate website and interactive database Accessible and searchable from corporate website and/or portal
Risks of KM Initial overhead and continuing maintenance without reuse Lack of shared vision and/or understanding of personal benefit Lack of commitment and resources Perception of additional work
34
Implementation Framework
Field Experiences and Collaboration
Corporate Leader Resources
Creating Knowledge Re-tasking and tagging current resource documents Creating templates, forms and best practices Tacit and explicit knowledge and experience
Capturing Knowledge Uploading documents Identify relevant websites with pertinent information Leaders posting their discoveries and experiences
Organizing Knowledge Tagging documents and templates to be consistent with the resource mapping Tagging and categorizing postings Validating postings
Sharing/Using/ Reusing Knowledge Accessible and searchable from corporate website and interactive database Accessible and searchable from corporate website and/or portal
Risks of KM Initial overhead and continuing maintenance without reuse Lack of shared vision and/or understanding of personal benefit Lack of commitment and resources Perception of additional work
35
Creating a Community of Practice
Comment
Establish a leader Establish an executive
sponsor Establish membership Establish a
community profile
Mary Jane Eisenhower President and CEO
Administrative and Support Staff Director of
Leadership Leadership Development Manager
Leadership Training Coordinator IAAS
Coordinator Leadership Development Coordinator
Team Vines Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Chapin Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Goddard Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Hoadley Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
36
Creating a Community of Practice
Establish a leader Establish an executive
sponsor Establish membership Establish a
community profile
Mary Jane Eisenhower President and CEO
Administrative and Support Staff Director of
Leadership Leadership Development Manager
Leadership Training Coordinator IAAS
Coordinator Leadership Development Coordinator
Team Vines Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Chapin Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Goddard Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Hoadley Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
37
Creating a Community of Practice
Establish a leader Establish an executive
sponsor Establish membership Establish a
community profile
Mary Jane Eisenhower President and CEO
Administrative and Support Staff Director of
Leadership Leadership Development Manager
Leadership Training Coordinator IAAS
Coordinator Leadership Development Coordinator
Team Vines Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Chapin Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Goddard Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Hoadley Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leader(s) Parents
Delegates
38
Establishing a Leader and Executive Sponsor
New Slide
  • Community leader organizes, develops and sustains
    a healthy community
  • Community leader can be facilitator or SME and
    respected member of peer group
  • Executive sponsor recruits members and obtains
    funds
  • Executive sponsor recognizes community efforts
  • Executive sponsor demonstrates KM behavior to
    organization

39
Creating a Community of Practice
Establish a leader Establish an executive
sponsor Establish membership Establish a
community profile
Mary Jane Eisenhower President and CEO
Administrative and Support Staff Director of
Leadership Leadership Development Manager
Leadership Training Coordinator IAAS
Coordinator Leadership Development Coordinator
Team Chapin Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Goddard Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Hoadley Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Team Vines Program Director Program
Manager Territory Manager Assoc Program
Manager
Chapter Delegation Leaders Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leaders Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leaders Parents
Delegates
Chapter Delegation Leaders Parents
Delegates
40
Establishing Membership
New Slide
  • Members are recruited by advertising the focus,
    goals and benefits using
  • Newsletters
  • Email
  • Word of mouth using core members
  • Community sponsored events
  • Community must be focused on relevant needs to
    retain membership
  • Community needs a theme to engage members to
    share knowledge

41
Creating a Community of Practice
Comment
Establish a leader Establish an executive
sponsor Establish membership Establish a
community profile
  • Vision/Scope
  • The purpose of the PTPI community is to
    facilitate the exchange, sharing, and reuse of
    preparation and travel experiences and
    discoveries.
  • Mission Statement
  • Capture, submit and share preparation and travel
    experiences and discoveries.
  • Provide a structured environment (both
    collaboratively and electronically) conducive to
    submitting and reusing
  • Promote linkages and relationships between PTPI
    staff and delegate leaders
  • Provide ready-access to information for trip
    planning, execution, and response to incidents

42
Creating a Community of Practice
Establish a leader Establish an executive
sponsor Establish membership Establish a
community profile
  • Vision/Scope
  • The purpose of the PTPI community is to
    facilitate the exchange, sharing, and reuse of
    preparation and travel experiences and
    discoveries
  • Mission Statement
  • Capture, submit and share preparation and travel
    experiences and discoveries
  • Provide a structured environment (both
    collaboratively and electronically) conducive to
    submitting and reusing
  • Promote linkages and relationships between PTP
    staff and delegate leaders
  • Provide ready-access to information for trip
    planning, execution, and response to incidents

43
Establishing a Community Profile
New Slide
  • Document describing the community and
    establishing aims and goals
  • Community leader creates profile
  • Leader, sponsor and key member develop
    vision/scope and mission statements
  • Role, responsibilities and time commitment are
    defined
  • Performance plan goals and objectives are defined
    for members
  • Community profile posted on website

44
Establishing a Community Profile
New Slide
Sample Community Profile Document
Profile Section Purpose
Vision/scope statement Explains how community intends to enable KM at global level
Mission statement States value of community and benefits for members
Measurable objectives Lists measurable goals for community members that will improve business efficiency and quality
Roles and responsibilities Lists generic community roles to be identified with specific assignments and update regularly
Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
45
Establishing Communications Through a Web Page
New Slide
  • Environment to provide members access to
    communication, collaborative events, member
    profiles and repository materials
  • Web site should contain quality content that is
    current
  • Components of a community web site
  • Table of contents
  • Access to training materials
  • Events information
  • Current Topics
  • Repository news
  • Instant messenger
  • Metrics

46
Sustaining a Community of Practice
Promoting leadership Rewards and
recognition Measuring success Monitoring Vitality
Reports
Motivate PTPI leadership to endorse and sponsor
proposed solution Raise level of awareness of KM
and value of proposed solution for delegate
leaders Provide rewards and incentives for
contributing KM solutions and lessons learned as
well as for the reuse of lessons
contributed Measure the number of contributions
by leader as well as the number of incidents of
reuse by leader Sudden changes in the trends of
submissions Sudden spikes or reductions in visits
to the community Web page Significant area/team
variations Global submissions Distinct
Contributors (Submitters) Distinct
Down-loaders Distinct Site Views
47
Communicating Within Communities
New Slide
Communication Methods
Audience Method Best Use of Method
Community Members E-mail Communication requiring fast action
Community Members, SMEs, Delegate Leaders Conference calls Regular working meetings and knowledge sharing among experts
Community members Instant training Training on specific topics using web casts or video teleconferencing
Community Members, SMEs, Delegate Leaders Summits and conferences Periodic collaborative events focused on high-interest topics
Community leader Process Email or web casts to gather feedback using questionnaires surveys
Community members Web site Used to share current events topics
Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
48
Promoting Leadership Within the Community
New Slide
  • Community leaders are
  • Subject matter experts (SME)
  • Designated community leader (CL)
  • Special interest groups (SIG)
  • Ways to promote leadership
  • Elect SMEs and SIG members
  • Assure SMEs have correct skills
  • Create ratio of SMEs to members
  • Supporting activities from the CL
  • Recognizing individual achievement
  • Building group identity
  • Establishing rewards and recognition program
  • Celebrating success
  • Delivering value

49
Sustaining a Community of Practice
Promoting leadership Rewards and
recognition Measuring success Monitoring Vitality
Reports
Motivate PTPI leadership to endorse and sponsor
proposed solution Raise level of awareness of KM
and value of proposed solution for delegate
leaders Provide rewards and incentives for
contributing KM solutions and lessons learned as
well as for the reuse of lessons
contributed Measure the number of contributions
by leader as well as the number of incidents of
reuse by leader Sudden changes in the trends of
submissions Sudden spikes or reductions in visits
to the community Web page Significant area/team
variations Global submissions Distinct
Contributors (Submitters) Distinct
Down-loaders Distinct Site Views
50
Rewards and Recognition
New Slide
  • Purpose is to encourage community members to
    develop, share and reuse knowledge
  • Supporting, using and contributing to this system
    are included in goals
  • Community level recognition begins during
    pre-launch and continue throughout implementation
  • Rewards include recognition on the website and
    monetary gift certificates

51
Sustaining a Community of Practice
Promoting leadership Rewards and
recognition Measuring success Monitoring Vitality
Reports
Motivate PTPI leadership to endorse and sponsor
proposed solution Raise level of awareness of KM
and value of proposed solution for delegate
leaders Provide rewards and incentives for
contributing KM solutions and lessons learned as
well as for the reuse of lessons
contributed Measure the number of contributions
by leader as well as the number of incidents of
reuse by leader Sudden changes in the trends of
submissions Sudden spikes or reductions in visits
to the community Web page Significant area/team
variations Global submissions Distinct
Contributors (Submitters) Distinct
Downloaders Distinct Site Views
52
Measuring Success
New Slide
  • What gets measured gets managed
  • Link measurement criteria to rewards and
    recognition
  • Community participation and activities to be
    measured
  • Visits to the website
  • Frequency and use of collaboration tools
  • Submissions of high quality and focused content
  • Frequency and types of search activities

53
Sustaining a Community of Practice
Promoting leadership Rewards and
recognition Measuring success Monitoring Vitality
Reports
Motivate PTPI leadership to endorse and sponsor
proposed solution Raise level of awareness of KM
and value of proposed solution for delegate
leaders Provide rewards and incentives for
contributing KM solutions and lessons learned as
well as for the reuse of lessons
contributed Measure the number of contributions
by leader as well as the number of incidents of
reuse by leader Sudden changes in the trends of
submissions Sudden spikes or reductions in visits
to the community Web page Significant area/team
variations Global submissions Distinct
Contributors (Submitters) Distinct
Down-loaders Distinct Site Views
54
What to Monitor
New Slide
  • Community leaders responsibility to ensure
    active and valuable community membership
  • Activities for community leader to monitor
  • Community profile activity
  • Changes in traffic of collaboration tools
  • Changes in website visits
  • Status of KA submissions including timely review
  • Changes in trends of KA submissions
  • Regional variations in above activities

55
Sustaining a Community of Practice
Promoting leadership Rewards and
recognition Measuring success Monitoring Vitality
Reports
Motivate PTPI leadership to endorse and sponsor
proposed solution Raise level of awareness of KM
and value of proposed solution for delegate
leaders Provide rewards and incentives for
contributing KM solutions and lessons learned as
well as for the reuse of lessons
contributed Measure the number of contributions
by leader as well as the number of incidents of
reuse by leader Sudden changes in the trends of
submissions Sudden spikes or reductions in visits
to the community Web page Significant area/team
variations Global submissions Distinct
Contributors (Submitters) Distinct
Down-loaders Distinct Site Views
56
Vitality Reports
New Slide
  • Reports summarizing data about individual and
    community activity on a regular basis
  • Reports to be generated in Phase I
  • Net change in community membership measured on
    monthly basis
  • Distinct site views measure community members
    accessing web site
  • Web site reporting collects visitation data by
    type of activity for community members
  • Reports to be generated in Phase II
  • Global submissions show overall growth in KA
    submissions
  • Distinct downloaders and submitters to show which
    community members are participating

57
Business Unit Scorecard
New Slide
  • Purpose is to break down regional barriers while
    building global community
  • Scorecards create healthy competition to increase
    intercommunity activity
  • Communicates levels of accomplishment such as
  • Green currently successful
  • Yellow room for improvement
  • Red needs improvement

58
Taxonomies
Comment
  • Building the Taxonomy
  • Utilize the corporate resource documents
  • Information from PTPI staff and delegate leaders
  • Survey novice and experienced leaders for the
    most important and most difficult information to
    find

59
Taxonomies
Comment
  • Structuring the Taxonomy
  • Navigational taxonomy
  • Based on user behavior and not on content
  • Organized hierarchically by categories and
    associative relationships between terms
  • Specialized and unique to PTPI

60
Taxonomies
  • Managing the Taxonomy
  • Centralized control and management for
    consistency and strength
  • Scheduled updates for stability

61
Taxonomies
Taxonomies
Sample PTPI Taxonomy
Leader Application
Leader Selection
Marketing/Advertising
Interviews
Delegate Selection
Orientation Meetings
Pre-Travel
Student/Leader Evaluations High School Credit
Evaluations Experience Report Reunion
Party Travel Forms
Travel
Travel
Post-Travel
62
Capturing Knowledge Assets
Capturing Knowledge Assets
Comment
Flow of Knowledge
Step Personal Space Community Space Corporate Space
Knowledge Development Personal discovery and/or experience (tacit-to-tacit exchange) Shared discovery through posting (tacit-to-explicit exchange) Collaboration (explicit-to-explicit exchange)
Content Management Diary and/or journal entries edited and categorized Content reviewed and organized Content reviewed for impact on corporate resource documents Changes applied
Knowledge Exposure Personal discoveries and/or experience posted Accessible to community members Resource documents on corporate Web site updated with best practices, templates, tips and examples
63
Capturing Knowledge Assets
Capturing Knowledge Assets
Comment
Managing Knowledge Assets
Community Content
Corporate Content
Leader Resource
Documents

Best Practice

Tips/Advice


Validated KA
Examples


Templates

Raw Knowledge Asset (KA)
64
Capturing Knowledge Assets
Exposing Knowledge Assets
  • Accessible through corporate Web site and/or
    portal
  • General broadcast message alerting members to
    new or important content
  • Leader resource documents
  • Templates and downloadable forms to avoid
    duplication of effort or recreation of existing
    content

65
Capturing Knowledge Assets
Decisions about Content
  • Agreement by key content providers on standards
    for knowledge capture
  • Adoption of a taxonomy and agreement on visual
    mapping
  • Assignment of taxonomy management to PTPI
    administration staff
  • Agreement on search environment

66
Building a KM Foundation
Comment
  • KM system is the technology platform and
    infrastructure used to share knowledge
  • Characteristics of a successful KM system
  • System provides a virtual community with multiple
    collaboration tools
  • System and knowledge assets (KAs) are easily
    accessible by all in the organization
  • System fits into users workflow processes
  • System is based on the organizational culture
  • System aligns with existing technical
    infrastructure
  • System is used by workers (the most important
    measure of success)

67
Role of Technology in KM
  • Provides a virtual environment allowing workers
    to share tacit knowledge and communicate across
    the organization
  • Provides a document repository or library
    allowing users to create, collect, publish,
    update, remove and reuse explicit KAs
  • Establishes processes for workers to use the
    virtual and library tools

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
68
Key Project Stages of a KM Initiative
Feedback
Design/ Development
Strategy
Maintenance/Continuous Learning
Requirements
Implementation
Solution Roadmap Source Conway, S. Sligar, C.
(2002). Unlocking Knowledge Assets Knowledge
Management Solutions from Microsoft. Redmond
Microsoft Press.
69
KM Strategy Planning
Comment
  • Organizational needs
  • Collaborative space for delegate leaders to
    exchange tacit knowledge and locate experts
  • Document repository to store information about
  • Trip planning
  • Country and culture specific issues
  • Lessons learned
  • Safety and abuse
  • Benefits of KM strategy
  • Solution focused on users with biggest need
    (delegate leaders)
  • Opportunity to pilot initial solution and measure
    results before expanding solution

70
KM Requirements Planning
Comment
  • KM elements to consider in this phase
  • Environment including type of collaboration tools
    needed for virtual community along with content
    and project resource requirements
  • Stakeholder support and project ownership within
    the organization
  • Technology needed to reach KM goals
  • User and infrastructure analysis for KM system
  • Measures of success are identified including how
    they will be measured

71
KM Design and Development Planning
Comment
  • Define the technology related processes for
    creating, capturing, organizing and distributing
    knowledge
  • Collaboration tools for virtual space for users
  • Library structure for document repository
  • Applications used for creating documents
  • Align KM processes with organizational culture
  • Virtual space where collaboration among delegate
    leaders and staff can occur
  • Tacit knowledge contributions from delegate
    leaders
  • Ready access to needed information
  • Retain highly motivated and committed delegate
    leaders
  • Build the technology solution

72
Three -Tier KM Structure
Comment
Tier 1
  • Tier 1 represents user interface to clients
    (users)
  • Tier 2 contains the business logic which connects
    clients with data
  • Tier 3 is where data is stored

Clients
ASP
Server
Tier 2
Components
Components
Tier 3
Three-Tier KM Architecture Source Conway, S.
Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking Knowledge Assets
Knowledge Management Solutions from Microsoft.
Redmond Microsoft Press.
Database
73
KM Process Structure
Comment
  • Create a communication process to encourage
    culture change to more collaboration among
    delegate leaders
  • Create a change management control process to
    continually validate KM design
  • Put feedback checkpoints into project review
    process
  • Consider scalability early in the design process
  • Solution should support organizational growth
  • Include areas of environment, process and
    technology

74
Technology Component Collaboration Tools
New Slide
  • Phase I will create a virtual space for delegate
    leader and staff collaboration
  • Collaboration tools will include
  • Email
  • Internet access
  • Chat room
  • Web casts and video conferencing
  • Discussion boards
  • Community profiles

75
Technology Component User Interface
  • Most visible element of KM architecture
  • Needs to be highly customizable
  • Should work within current infrastructure
  • Recommend MS SharePoint Portal Server
  • Integrates Tier 1 and 2 components
  • Users share and publish information using data
    access and indexing services
  • Provides single location to initiate searches
  • Provides collaboration through email and the
    portal
  • Provides document versioning and categorization
  • Consolidates personal, community, corporate and
    external information on one screen (digital
    dashboard)
  • Integrates with Office XP products

76
Technology Component Data Storage
Comment
  • Tier 3 repository used for knowledge assets are
    stored
  • SharePoint Portal Server content types
  • Community profiles
  • Business information in document format
  • E-mail and discussion boards
  • Recommend SQL Server 2000
  • Better suited for content with a structured
    taxonomy
  • Already exists as organizational application

77
KM Implementation Planning
  • Purpose of implementation
  • Ready the organization
  • Roll-out the solution
  • Monitor and adjust processes to real world
    organization
  • Implementation activities
  • Early and continuous communication
  • User training
  • Collaborative environments
  • Knowledge exchanges
  • Document centric system components

78
KM Maintenance Planning
  • Purpose of maintenance
  • Sustain new KM system
  • Assure system changes as user and business needs
    change
  • Maintenance activities
  • Dedicated people and documented processes to keep
    system running on daily basis
  • Set up feedback channels to collect and integrate
    new business goals, organizational changes or
    user requirements into new versions
  • Regular hardware and software updates
  • Disaster planning and security audits
  • Mechanism for providing user feedback
  • Usage analysis to monitor what functions are
    being used

79
KM Success Story KM Activities and Behaviors
  • Activities
  • KM web site visits
  • Use of knowledge assets
  • Use of search function
  • Users who participated in a collaborative
    conversation (tacit exchange)
  • Behaviors
  • Specific items read
  • Users as knowledge consumers or contributors
  • Use of search results
  • Tracking who initiated and who answered these
    conversations

80
KM System and Repository Measures
  • KM System Indicators
  • Site availability
  • Hrs of downtime
  • Connection speed
  • Errors while downloading KAs
  • Errors while using search function
  • User inability to connect through email or portal
  • Reporting to track key performance indicators
  • How many users to site
  • How many downloads
  • How many search results
  • How much email traffic
  • Feedback from users on perceptions of the value
    of KM solution

81
Knowledge Value Analysis
Comment
Value Chain
Increased Use of Human Capital. Reduced Health,
Safety Abuse Risk, Delegate Leader Retention
Activity Chain
Enhances
Enables
Enhanced delegate leader qualifications
motivation
Work Activities
Behaviors
  • Website visits
  • Use of KAs
  • Use of search
  • Participation in
  • collaborative
  • conversation
  • of items read
  • Users as consumers
  • Users as contributors
  • Use of search results
  • Users as initiators/
  • responders of
  • conversations
  • Feedback from users

Cost avoidance due to increased retention of
delegate leaders risk reduction, reduction
of knowledge life cycle and more meaningful
experience for students
Increased membership fees due more satisfied
students
Measurement Chain
Increased program fees due to improved quality of
programs
Time and quality
Correlate
Develop and reuse
Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
82
Knowledge Searching and Services
Comment
  • PTPI site will present the following types of
    searches to users
  • Free-text searches where user can enter any set
    of words
  • Taxonomy based searches where user can search on
    a property such as author, category or keyword
  • Advanced Searching functionality provided by
    free-text and taxonomy search functionality
  • Ability to search for experts

83
Knowledge Searching and Services
Comment
  • Returning optimal search results
  • PTPI will validate all KAs submitted
  • KAs will be aligned with the taxonomy structure
  • SharePoint Portal Server supports capability of
    extending key search features including searching
    for experts
  • Personalization of content to users
  • PTPI will use personalization functionality
  • KAs will be personalized based on role (delegate
    leaders, students, staff, etc.)

84
Knowledge Searching and Services
Comment
  • Phase I - Finding an expert
  • PTPI will use this functionality in their initial
    deployment
  • Delegate leaders profiles will include including
    previous trip experience
  • Phase II - Subscription and notification
  • PTPI will provide these services within the
    functionality of the SharePoint Portal Server
  • Users will be able to subscribe for notification
    if documents are updated or submitted
  • Users will be able to subscribe for notification
    if a specific author submits a new documents
  • Users will be able to subscribe for notification
    if an expert changes

85
Review of Project Design for KM System
Comment
  • 5 focal points of organizational culture enabled
    by technology
  • Sharing tacit knowledge by collaborating using a
    virtual community
  • Connecting knowledge through teams and
    communities
  • Managing explicit knowledge to make it useful for
    others
  • Measuring what you manage
  • Building on a solid foundation

Source Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
Knowledge Assets Knowledge Management Solutions
from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
86
References
  • Conway, S. Sligar, C. (2002). Unlocking
    knowledge assets knowledge management solutions
    from Microsoft. Redmond Microsoft Press.
  • Cross, R. Prusak, L. (2002). The people who
    make organizations go-or stop. Harvard Business
    Review, Reprint R0206G, 5-12.
  • Nonaka, I. (1991). The knowledge creating
    company. Harvard Business Review, Reprint 91608.
  • Penuel, B. Cohen, A. (2003). Coming to the
    crossroads of knowledge, learning, and
    technology integrating knowledge management and
    workplace learning. Cambridge The MIT Press.
  • Salisbury, M.W. (2003). Putting theory into
    practice to build knowledge management systems.
    Journal of Knowledge Management, 7(2), 128-141.

87
People to People Knowledge Management
Implementation Plan
  • Anne Beamon
  • Myra Herrmann
  • Denny Lester
  • OLIT 507 Knowledge Management
  • November 17, 2005

88
PTP Websites
People to People Website
www.StudentAmbassadors.org
Teacher Leader Share Point Link
http//s106420737.onlinehome.us/olit507F05/Myra-He
rrmann/People/default.aspx
89
SharePoint Implementation
  • Knowledge Resources
  • Collaborative Sharing/Learning
  • Expert Identification
  • Taxonomy

90
SharePoint Implementation
  • Knowledge Resources
  • Organized based on PTP Taxonomy
  • Best practices, templates, forms, documents
  • Existing user guide retasked into downloadable
    and reusable forms and templates
  • Metadata/tags on documents to support search
    capabilities

91
SharePoint Implementation
  • Collaborative Sharing/Learning
  • Discussion boards structured on PTP Taxonomy
  • Forum for sharing and/or requesting information

92
SharePoint Implementation
  • Expert Identification
  • Teacher profiles with searchable criteria
  • Pre-defined criteria to ensure data integrity and
    consistency
  • Examples of criteria/metadata include
  • Countries traveled
  • Years with PTP
  • Chapter and state affiliation

93
SharePoint Implementation
  • Taxonomy
  • Navigational taxonomy
  • Based on user behavior and not on content
  • Organized hierarchically by categories and
    associative relationships between terms
  • Specialized and unique to PTPI

94
SharePoint Implementation
  • Surveys
  • Requests for incomplete and/or missing
    information that would allow teacher leaders to
    be more efficient on their jobs
  • Supplement discussion boards
About PowerShow.com