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ATMOSPHERIC WAVE INTERACTIONS WITH THE WINTER POLAR VORTICES 0100 KM

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Niche Mission Workshop, St.-Hubert, QC, 29/30 September, 2005 ... annular mode for weak events (A) and strong events (B) [Baldwin and Dunkerton, 2001] ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: ATMOSPHERIC WAVE INTERACTIONS WITH THE WINTER POLAR VORTICES 0100 KM


1
ATMOSPHERIC WAVE INTERACTIONS WITH THE WINTER
POLAR VORTICES (0-100 KM)
  • Sudden stratospheric warmings
  • Stratosphere-troposphere coupling
  • Mesospheric thermal inversions
  • Equinoctial transitions
  • Ozone Anomalies, and
  • Solar coupling and climate change
  • A CAWSES 2004-2008 (http//www.bu.edu/cawses/)
  • Project of Theme 3 Atmospheric Coupling
    Processes Co-ordinator Alan
    Manson
  • Campaign 2004/5 Tatyana
    Chshyolkova
  • (with Chris
    Meek)

2
THE PROJECT
  • We will study the polar vortices (0-100 km) using
    both observations and models during the winters
    of CAWSES each winter will become a Campaign
    beginning in the year 2004/5. The focus is upon
    Radiationally Unexpected Phenomena (i.e.
    dynamics), and processes involved in climate
    changes.
  • Observations of Planetary Wave, Tidal and Gravity
    Wave characteristics and interactions with the
    mean flow will be made.
  • Collaborations involving other projects that deal
    with summer mesopause processes, global ozone
    distribution, tidal characterization, gravity
    waves and turbulence, and coupling processes in
    the equatorial atmosphere will be necessary.
    Collaboration with the Solar influence on
    climate theme is desirable for assessments of
    solar effects upon the dynamics.

3
Upward coupling, involving convection, latent
heat deposition and gravity wave/ tidal forcing
a cumulonimbus cloud.
4
Hemispheric coupling, involving meridional flow
from summer to winter mesopause regions
noctilucent clouds (over Finland) at the coldest
part (85 km) of the earths atmosphere (in
summer) --- gravity waves as cause and effect.
5
Gravity waves leaving traces in the mesopause
they help form Noctilucent clouds over
Aberdeen, Michael Gadsden, formed from water
vapour at 85 km altitude.
The drag exerted by planetary waves (PW) modify
the winter vortices through the hemispheric
Brewer-Dobson circulation, and drag due to PW and
GW modify and close the vortices in the
mesosphere through a global circulation.
6
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7
LINKS TO CANDAC-PEARL
  • PEARL VHF RADAR (meteor) contributes to high
    latitude radar network radar observations
  • Global Vortex characterization (stratosphere-mesos
    phere) will be provided to PEARL researchers for
    Canadian regional studies
  • Links between stratospheric vortex and
    tropospheric weather in the Canadian polar region
    will be investigated
  • Climate change tropical processes (QBO, ENSO)
    and solar influences affect the polar vortices,
    and hence global climate

8
WORKING PLANS
  • Radars (MFR, MWR) and optical instruments mid-
    and high-latitude CPEA data
  • Satellite missions TIMED (TIDI, SABER), Odin
    (OSIRIS), ...
  • MetO assimilated fields
  • TIME-GCM and CMAM, with data assimilation

9
PARTICIPANTS
  • Project Coordinator NH Facilitator Alan Manson
  • Radar Steering Committee (NH) N. Mitchell, W.
    Singer, W. Hocking, D. Riggin, Yu. Portnyagin,
    C. Hall, A. Manson (Chair), and Y. Murayama
  • SH Coordinator Scott Palo
  • Radar Steering Committee (SH) S. Avery, J.
    Forbes, R. Vincent, G. Fraser, D. Riggin,
    D. Fritts, M. Tsutsumi, T. Aso
  • Optical Coordinator (NH) Marianna Shepherd
  • Satellite Coordinators D. Riggin, S. Palo et al.
    (TIMED-SABER and/or TIDI), and T. Llewellyn, D.
    Degenstein (Odin-OSIRIS)
  • Models R. Swinbank (MetO), M. Hagan (TIME-GCM,
    GSWM), T. Shepherd (CMAM), M. Salby and D.
    Ortland
  • Advisory group Ray Roble, Ted Shepherd, and Norm
    McFarlane (SPARC) (models) William Randel and
    Ted Llewellyn (ozone) David Fritts, Murry Salby
    and Jeff Forbes (wave processes-dynamics) Karin
    Labitzke and Michael Rycroft (solar processes)
    Karin Labitzke (SSW) Gordon Shepherd
    (chemical-dynamical coupling)

10
PROGRESS ON CAMPAIGN I
  • The data are available or coming soon from 13
    radars, stretching from Yamagawa (31N) to
    Svalbard (78N)
  • Analysis using wavelets and mean wind plots are
    completed as soon as the data arrive
  • Preliminary results show that PW activity (gt10 d)
    is greatest in Feb. March. PW activity during
    the earlier part of the winter is low.
  • MetO data are used to characterize winter vortex
    at stratospheric heights.

11
PROGRESS ON CAMPAIGN I
  • Radar (82 km) winds show changes before and
    during the Stratospheric Warming, SSW, (near end
    of February)

12
PROGRESS ON CAMPAIGN I
  • Zonal (EW) and meridional (NS) reversals (to -ve)
    occur near day 60 (end of February/early March)

13
PROGRESS ON CAMPAIGN I
Unusually low PW actually in early winter (strong
vortex)
Wavelet
14
POGRESS ON CAMPAIGN I
15
PROGRESS ON CAMPAIGN I
16
PROGRESS ON CAMPAIGN I
Amplitudes of stationary wave (n1) at 30 km peak
at the end of February (left). The zonal mean
meridional wind also have mean northward flow
(this is a traditional analysis method of SSW).
17
PROGRESS ON CAMPAIGN I
18
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19
Questions regarding the Vortex and Atmospheric
processes of climate change
  • Why are there secular variations (decadal scales)
    in planetary wave activity (sub-tropics and high
    latitudes), and hence in the characteristics of
    the vortices (0-100 km)
  • Given that the winter vortices (and related
    jet-stream locations) dominate the weather and
    climate of the extra-tropics, and the reality of
    Global Change, what are the dominant processes
    involved in vortex-variability over short (QBO)
    and longer (11-100 years) time scales GHG
    changes, solar variability, aerosols, wave
    forcing (GW, PW, tides)
  • Given the statistical linkages between solar
    variability and climate characteristics, what are
    the sensitivities in the solar-terrestrial
    system, and where are they located in height and
    location (pole to equator)
  • What are the implications for minor-constituent
    distributions (ozone, methane, H2O,) over the
    globe, of variable and changing vortices in
    summer and winter in both hemispheres
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