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Involving young people in crime and disorder audits and strategies

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Title: Involving young people in crime and disorder audits and strategies


1
Involving young people in crime and disorder
audits and strategies
  • Gavin Butler, GOWM
  • Charlie Spencer, Birmingham YOS

2
Aims of session
  • Ask why we should involve young people in crime
    and disorder audits
  • Look at some patterns and trends in involvement
    work
  • Methods of involvement
  • Using data for consultation and involvement

3
Introduction the problem of authority
  • Suffering does not bestow expertise Bad
    Thoughts Jamie Whyte
  • Does being young bestow expertise? Why?

4
What do we mean by children and young people?
  • SureStart/Early years partnerships 0-5, families
    and play
  • Childrens Fund/Primary/Middle School 5-13
  • ConneXions/Secondary/FE 13-19
  • YOT individuals rising 10 and over
  • The defining characteristic is vulnerablity

5
Why do it?
  • The government says we should
  • The UN says we should
  • It may increase democratic participation
  • It is a protective factor against involvement in
    crime and ASB (Farrington), and helps protection
  • CYP have experiences as victims and offenders
    that are more numerous and different than those
    of older people

6
Primary research and consultation
  • Primary research young people as victims, peak
    times and location, YOT data, resources available
    for young people
  • Consultation on findings checking that the
    information gathered is valid, asking young
    people to prioritise and make decisions

7
Dissemination of findings how?
  • British Journal of criminology?
  • Text messaging?
  • Or by example actually changing services

8
Challenges
  • Talking to the chess club
  • Gender and diversity limitations on the
    literature on risk (Cambridge, Graham and
    Bowling)
  • Language, culture, disability, young children
  • Young people and ICT Japanese internet use via
    phones, first generation of children who are
    experts (Tapscott)

9
West Midlands Audits and Strategies, 2002
  • 85 consulted young people
  • 12 consulted families with young children
  • 52 identifies young people as a priority/cross
    cutting theme
  • Less that 10 made a link with CF, CYP
    strategies etc
  • Stronger links with YOT and Connexions plans

10
Methods and outcomes
  • Suggestion boxes, graffiti walls, websites
  • Peers as researchers
  • Use existing resources youth services, youth for
    a, ConneXions, YOT, CF etc
  • Consider rewards and incentivisation

11
Ladder of participation (from Arnstein)
  • 8. Young person initiated,
  • shared decision making with adults
  • 7. YP initiated and directed
  • 6. Adult initiated
  • 5. YP consulted and informed
  • 4. YP assigned but informed
  • 3. Tokenism
  • 2. Decoration
  • 1. Manipulation

12
Feedback and outcomes what changed?
  • How are you going to let children and young
    people know what happened as a result of the
    consultation or involvement?

13
Public engagement and decision making and popular
induction
  • People are unmoved by the sorts of dry,
    statistical data that are dear to the hearts of
    scientists and policy plannersthen social and
    technological progress must be impeded unless
    effective, concrete, emotionally interesting ways
    of communicating conclusions are developed
  • Kahneman, Slovic and Tversky

14
Example Youth Space design
  • They (the architect and designer) let us do our
    own thing. Theyve tried to take one of our skate
    moves-the kickflip-and use computers to create a
    designthe structure will represent the flow of
    the board
  • The Guardian, June 2, 204

15
Cutting edge design 1 exterior
16
Cutting edge designs 2 interior
17
Young people who offend
  • Almost half under-achieving at school
  • Around 25 with special educational needs
    identified - 15 with SEN statement
  • 20 vulnerable to harm
  • In one Borough nearly half previously on the
    child protection register
  • One-quarter report having a mental health problem
  • 10 times as likely to have serious substance
    misuse problem as non-offenders
  • Up to an estimated 1,000 young people per year
    receive secure remand due to lack of somewhere
    suitable to live
  • Source YJB 2004

18
Filtered data example
19
Data example 2 what could we build on here?
20
Close
  • Summary
  • Innovation? Good practice?
  • Conclusions
  • Gavin Butler, 0121 212 5230, gbutler.GOWM_at_go-regio
    ns.gsi.gov.uk
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