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Homebased Reading Practice and Reading Achievement of Elementary Education Students

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Title: Homebased Reading Practice and Reading Achievement of Elementary Education Students


1
Home-based Reading Practice and Reading
Achievement of Elementary Education Students
  • Dr. Candace Baker
  • Texas A M International University
  • candace.baker_at_tamiu.edu
  • http//www.tamiu.edu/coedu/SpecPops/sped.shtml
  • scroll down to find my name and picture then
    look for link to CEC presentation.

2
Research related to parent tutoring
  • A brief review of the literature

3
Gortmaker, Daly, McCurdy, Persampieri,
Hergenrader (2007). Improving reading outcomes
for children with learning disabilities
  • Children can benefit from parent involvement when
    parents are guided in the application of a good
    intervention.
  • Study showed increased CRWs for reading fluency
  • Parents reported seeing improved reading in their
    child
  • One weakness noted in previous research is lack
    of generalized improvement in reading outcomes
  • Look at word overlap of different reading
    passages

4
The article
  • Children can benefit from parent involvement when
    parents are guided in the application of a good
    intervention.
  • Study showed increased CRWs for reading fluency
  • Parents reported seeing improved reading in their
    child
  • One weakness noted in previous research is lack
    of generalized improvement in reading outcomes
  • Look at word overlap of different reading passages

5
Erion (2006). Parent tutoring A meta-analysis
  • Research on parent effectiveness as tutors is
    inconclusive because of research methodology
    concerns.
  • Cited Fantuzzo et. al. (1995), Gang Poche
    (1982) and Koven LeBow (1973) to state that
    parents can have a positive impact on student
    learning if they are given appropriate materials
    and training in their use
  • Only 3 studies measured level of treatment
    integrity using implementation checks
  • In general, the meta-analysis did find support
    for parent tutoring and student outcomes

6
Persampieri et. al. (2006). Promoting parent use
of empirically supported reading interventions.
  • Cited others to state that parents can be
    effective as tutors, but many report they do no
    know how to help and feel inadequate
  • Evidence-based practices now list
  • Guided oral reading
  • Listening passage preview
  • Repeated readings
  • Error correction, performance feedback, and
    reward contingencies
  • Study found efficacy for parent tutoring

7
Hitchcock, Prater, Dowrick (2004). Reading
comprehension fluency Effects of tutoring
  • Cited Dowrick et. al. (2001) Jenkins et. al.
    (2000) to support effectiveness of tutoring by
    an adult or community partner

8
Fiala Sheridan (2003). Parent involvement
reading
  • Cited Fredericks Rasinski (1990) for successful
    parent effort
  • Involve real reading
  • Enjoyable, efficient, easy to implement
    activities
  • Connection between home school
  • Consistency commitment rather than short-term
    single activity
  • Parents do not know how reading instruction is
    delivered or how to help
  • Past research not of high quality

9
Rasinski Stevenson (2005). Fast Start Reading
A fluency based home reading program
  • Fast Start Program
  • Parent reads brief text (multiple times) to and
    with their child
  • Parent listens to the child read
  • Parent engages child in word study activity
  • Positive impact for all children in the
    experimental group (1st grade)
  • Even more impact for those students in lowest
    half of scores in experimental group

10
So, what do we know?
  • Some parents are motivated to tutor
  • Most of them feel inadequate in instructional
    methodology
  • Researchers all recommend parent training in
    evidence-based practices with follow-up for
    integrity checks
  • When parents are educated to deliver tutoring
    using evidence-based practices, their children
    have positive outcomes for reading fluency

11
A look at our population
  • This study was conducted in a university clinic
    where community families paid for supplemental
    instruction for their children who were served in
    public and/or private P-12 schools
  • The students all received special education
    services in their schools under various
    categories
  • The students received progress monitoring for CWR
    per minute in our clinic and had word decoding
    skills
  • The families requested information for effective
    ways to help their children learn to read

12
A look at best practice
  • National Reading Panel (200)
  • Guided oral reading interventions for word
    recognition, fluency and comprehension
  • Listening passage preview (reading to the
    student)
  • Repeated readings (read and re-read same passage)
  • Error correction
  • Feedback
  • Reward contingencies

13
How do we condense evidence-based practice to
educate families for tutoring?
  • We knew that it would be too resource intensive
    to provide the instruction, modeling/demonstration
    , feedback, and integrity checks over the course
    of the intervention that is required
  • We looked for a commercial package to meet the
    requirements

14
Our choice
  • We decided to use the One Minute Reader from Read
    Naturally because
  • It incorporated the recommendations from the
    National Reading Panel (2000) in the activities
  • It came with a DVD that families could refer back
    to at any time to clarify procedures
  • We added a procedure to complement the package
    that focused on parent reflection for each
    tutoring session
  • Qualitative data
  • Served as an integrity check

15
Parent training
  • Individual consultation to view the DVD with the
    researcher and/or the assistant and answer any
    questions
  • About 1 hour
  • Introduction to the additional session
    questionaire
  • Length of session
  • Errors on final reading
  • Score on comprehension check
  • Growth on Hot Reading ( of words)
  • Rating of enjoyment (parent and child)
  • Amount of time in direct supervision of session

16
Reading Fluency Generalization
  • Collected data within the OMR
  • Collected data with a one minute reading probe
    from the Basic Skills (Sopris West)
  • Collected data with the Basic Reading Inventory
    (Jerry Johns BRI)

17
Participants
  • Hal was a 12 year old AA student identified as
    having an emotional disturbance with a secondary
    learning disability
  • Oscar was a 10 year old AA student diagnosed
    with CP, visual impairment, seizure disorder, and
    receives special education under the category of
    cognitive disabilities
  • Sheila was a 10 year old EA student who was
    identified as a struggling reader by her
    general education teacher.

18
Sheila
  • The mother was very adept with the instructional
    package
  • The mother started out supervising about ¾ of the
    session then to about ½ of the session and
    finished the majority of the sessions supervising
    less than ¼ of the session
  • The mother reported satisfaction with the program

19
Sheilas outcomes
Fourth Grade Passage
Fifth Grade passage
20
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21
Hals outcomes
  • Both Hal and his mother greatly enjoyed the OMR
    stories and strategies
  • Hal finished 2 grade levels of stories during the
    6 weeks of sessions
  • The mother reported spending almost the whole
    time in direct supervision then finished the last
    2 weeks supervising about ¾ of the session

22
Hals outcomes
23
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24
Oscars outcomes
  • Oscars mother provided additional qualitative
    data to the individual session sheets
  • The first 2 weeks were like pulling teeth then
    the remaining 6 weeks were somewhat enjoyable to
    strongly enjoyable
  • The mother was singing our praise!

25
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26
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27
Discussion
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