The beginning of the end? Recent changes in competition policy and regional aid Fiona Wishlade 25th Meeting of the EPRC Regional Policy Research Consortium Ross Priory, Loch Lomondside 3-5 October 2004 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The beginning of the end? Recent changes in competition policy and regional aid Fiona Wishlade 25th Meeting of the EPRC Regional Policy Research Consortium Ross Priory, Loch Lomondside 3-5 October 2004

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Title: The beginning of the end? Recent changes in competition policy and regional aid Fiona Wishlade 25th Meeting of the EPRC Regional Policy Research Consortium Ross Priory, Loch Lomondside 3-5 October 2004


1

Second National Development ConferenceAthens, 9
December 2005
A STRATEGIC APPROACH TO COHESION The
Development Planning of EU Member
StatesProfessor John Bachtler European
Policies Research Centre University of
Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland john.bachtler_at_stra
th.ac.uk
2
European Policies Research Centre
  • specialises in comparative research on public
    policy throughout Europe
  • focus on monitoring and analysis of regional
    development policies at European and national
    levels
  • policy advice and exchange of experience through
    two networks
  • IQ-Net (Improving the Quality of Programme
    Management) regional and national Structural
    Fund programme management authorities from 12
    Member States www.eprc.strath.ac.uk/iqnet/
  • EoRPA (European Regional Policy Research Network)
    - national government departments responsible for
    regional policy 10 countries

3
IQ-Net partners national and regional
programme management authorities
  • Austria
  • Lower Austria
  • Styria
  • Italy
  • Lombardy
  • Tuscany
  • IPI/Min. of Prod. Activities
  • Belgium
  • Min of Flemish Community
  • Hungary
  • National Office for
  • Territorial Development
  • Denmark
  • North Jutland/Nat Agency
  • Poland
  • Marshall Office of
  • Slaskie Voivodeship
  • Finland
  • Western Finland Alliance
  • Ministry of the Interior
  • Spain
  • País Vasco
  • France
  • DATAR/CNASEA
  • Sweden
  • Norra Norrland
  • Norra
  • Germany
  • North-Rhine Westphalia
  • Saxony Anhalt
  • United Kingdom
  • North-East England
  • Office of Deputy Prime
  • Minister
  • Wales (WEFO)
  • Western Scotland (SEP)
  • Greece
  • Min of Economy Finance

4
A Strategic Approach to Cohesion
  • Strategic approach of EU Cohesion policy
  • Key factors influencing strategies
  • Current status of the NSRFs
  • Approaches to strategy development
  • NSRF scope and focus
  • NSRF objectives and development paths
  • NSRF types of strategies
  • Key questions

5
National Strategic Reference Frameworks
Strategic approach
  • Strategic approach is shaped by
  • the amount of funding available
  • the agreed strategic objectives in the Community
    Strategic Guidelines
  • the content of the Regulations, notably with
    respect to eligible expenditure
  • previous programme experience
  • national circumstances

6
National Strategic Reference Frameworks Key
factors
  • Organising the strategy development process
  • Establishing the scope of consultation
  • Making policy choices
  • The equity-efficiency dilemma
  • The importance accorded to Lisbon/Gothenburg
  • Balancing political and institutional priorities
  • Coordination with national policies

7
State-of-play of the NSRFs Stages
Formative Stages
First Draft
Final Drafts
Denmark, Germany, Sweden
Austria, Poland, Malta, Latvia, Spain, Netherlands
France, Greece, Hungary, Finland, Italy, UK
  • A small number of countries have already reached
    the final stage of NSRF preparation
  • Many others are still working on their first
    draft versions
  • Some are still involved with the formative stages
    of strategy development

8
Approaches to Strategy Development Regional
input
National Strategic Reference Framework
National Strategic Reference Framework
National Strategic Reference Framework
Top-down
Bottom-up
Mixed
Regional input
Regional input
Regional input
9
Approaches to Strategy DevelopmentDevelopment
Planning in Greece
  • Greece among the EU countries having made
    advanced progress
  • long-term process of preparatory planning
  • extensive reflection and analysis (studies of
    challenges and development perspectives)
  • consultation with national, regional and local
    partners (planning groups, circulars, Development
    Conferences)
  • first draft of future strategy - identification
    of seven strategic development axes

10
National Strategic Reference Frameworks Content
  • Scope
  • Objectives
  • Development paths
  • Types of strategy

11
NSRFs Scope and Strategic Focus
  • Mostly broad and general
  • Either deliberately (e.g. Germany, UK and France)
  • Or as a result of the need to accommodate various
    views/interests (e.g. Italy)
  • Focused
  • Austria and Denmark (Lisbon)
  • Finland (focussed on specific needs of regions)

12
NSRFs Overarching Goals
  • Lisbon, i.e. increased competitiveness through
    knowledge economy all countries
  • Growth and productivity Greece, Germany,
    Hungary, Sweden, UK
  • Employment Denmark, Greece, Poland, Sweden, and
    qualification of human resources Austria
  • Territorial attractiveness and/or overcoming of
    spatial challenges - Austria, France, Nordic
    countries

13
NSRFs Development Paths
  • Contextual interventions (services of general
    economic interest/collective services,
    institutional and market reforms) Hungary,
    Italy and, Finland Sweden
  • Innovation, RD, Competitiveness all countries
  • Growth pole/competitiveness pole strategy
    Austria, France, Hungary, Italy, Poland
  • Other key themes
  • sustainable development/gender mainstreaming
    (Austria)
  • territorial cooperation (Austria, Sweden)
  • balanced regional structure (Finland)
  • attractiveness of urban/rural areas (Germany)
  • development of peripheries and special-type
    regions (Hungary,
  • France)

14
NSRF Types of Strategies
  • Three broad groups of countries
  • Lisbon-focused strategies
  • Basic development strategies
  • Mix of basic development and Lisbon strategies
  • Consider each group in terms of
  • EU funding
  • Policy context
  • Focus of EU programmes
  • Implementation issues

15
NSRF Types of Strategies Group 1
Lisbon-focused strategies
  • Countries/regions
  • Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, the
    Netherlands, Sweden, UK
  • Regions of northern/central Italy western
    Germany
  • EU funding
  • Reduced EU Cohesion policy support
  • Most or all funding under Regional
    Competitiveness Employment programmes
  • Policy context
  • Regional disparities of limited importance (in
    some countries)
  • National regional development policies focusing
    on growth, competitiveness and employment
  • Long-established territorial dimension to
    economic development through regional policies,
    regional innovation strategies, regional/urban
    cluster policies, regional productivity, skills
    or entrepreneurship initiatives
  • Well-developed implementation systems
    specialist intermediaries, sophisticated delivery
    systems

16
NSRF Types of Strategies Group 1
Lisbon-focused strategies
  • Focus of EU programmes
  • NSRFs designed around foci such as innovation,
    use of new technology, quality of human
    resources, entrepreneurship, sustainable
    development
  • OP measures will address advisory/consultancy
    support, new financial instruments, utilisation
    of IT by target groups and innovative
    applications, regional innovation networking,
    specialist training, and improved delivery of
    education and training
  • Implementation issues
  • Managing a reduced amount of funding need to
    make difficult choices
  • Thematic focus tensions between sectoral policy
    and regional policy ministries
  • Spatial focus concentration on growth
    poles/centres or broad regions?

17
NSRF Types of Strategies Group 2 Basic
development strategies
  • Countries/regions
  • Most of the new Member States Candidate
    Countries
  • EU funding
  • Significantly higher EU Cohesion policy support
    major transfers
  • Most or all funding under Convergence programmes
  • Policy context
  • Most important policy challenge is convergence
    with other parts of the EU, need to address basic
    development needs
  • Growing regional and social disparities,
    especially between metropolitan regions and other
    areas
  • Historically limited role for national regional
    policies relatively small-scale schemes
  • Weak territorial dimension to policy-making and
    delivery
  • Institutional capacity problems

18
NSRF Types of Strategies Group 2 Basic
development strategies
  • Focus of EU programmes
  • NSRFs have commitment to growth, employment and
    sustainable development, but main focus will be
    on public investment and basic conditions for
    business development
  • OPs will address mainly transport, telecoms and
    other physical infrastructure, human capital,
    environment improvement
  • Measures also for Lisbon but secondary to main
    development goals
  • Implementation issues
  • Policy choices balance between long-term
    investment and measures providing immediate
    returns between national growth
    (competitiveness) and reducing disparities
    (cohesion)
  • Spatial focus balance between focus on
    metropolitan regions (pre-conditions in place)
    and other areas (basic needs to be addressed)
  • institutional framework for managing Structural
    and Cohesion Funds
  • coordination of divergent sectoral policy
    interests
  • scope for regionalisation
  • lack of intermediaries
  • absorption challenges personnel, skills,
    systems etc
  • Managing expectations of societal groups with
    respect to the availability of funding

19
NSRF Types of Strategies Group 3 Mix of basic
development and Lisbon strategies
  • Countries/regions
  • Greece, Portugal, Spain and (partly) Ireland
  • Regions of southern Italy eastern Germany
  • EU funding
  • Reduced EU Cohesion policy support, although
    still sizeable transfers
  • Mix of Convergence, Phasing-in/out and Regional
    Competitiveness Employment programmes
  • Policy context
  • Previous support has provided a good basis for
    support, but some regions still suffering
    infrastructure deficits and other basic
    development needs
  • Strong regional differentiation, especially
    between capital city/metropolitan areas and
    peripheral or underdeveloped regions
  • Regional policies of increasing importance
  • Regional-level administrative capacity to take on
    more economic development responsibilities

20
NSRF Types of Strategies Group 3 Mix of basic
development and Lisbon strategies
  • Focus of EU programmes
  • NSRFs have commitment to Lisbon/Gothenburg but
    accompanied by continued support for basic
    infrastructure and generic business investment
    and employment measures
  • Greater emphasis on innovation and technology
    transfer, targeted skills, entrepreneurship,
    financial engineering, environmental and energy
    management, secondary infrastructure
    (bottlenecks) and multimodal and logistics
    projects
  • Implementation issues
  • Policy choices need for greater selectivity
    building on pre-conditions for growth and
    competitiveness
  • Better coordination between EU and domestic
    policy interventions, with more strategic
    approach to national development planning
  • Rationalisation of national-level OPs fewer
    managing authorities at national level
  • Greater importance of regions (ROPs) in the
    design and delivery of future Structural Funds
    strategies and programmes
  • Need for investment in administrative capacity to
    strengthen intermediaries and implementation
    systems for Lisbon-type interventions, especially
    at regional level

21
Key Issues and Questions
  • Uncertainty about the EU policy context (budget,
    regulations)
  • Focus on Lisbon/Gothenburg
  • Integration of national and EU strategies
  • Policy coordination
  • Institutional capacity
  • Thematic targeting of resources
  • Spatial dimension of EU funding
  • Learning from good practice
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