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Safety for Chemistry Department Teaching Assistant

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Title: Safety for Chemistry Department Teaching Assistant


1
Safety for Chemistry Department Teaching
Assistant
  • September 2007

2
Objectives
  • To become familiar with OSHA regulations related
    to laboratories including the OSHA Lab Standard
    and the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard
  • To become familiar with sources of chemical
    information including Material Safety Data Sheets
    and proper chemical labeling
  • To become familiar with ways to detect and
    protect from chemical hazards
  • To become familiar with proper fume hood
    practices
  • To become familiar with emergency procedures
    including fire extinguisher use

3
Objectives
  • To recognize hazardous waste
  • To know Tulane Universitys Policies concerning
    hazardous waste
  • To know how to properly label hazardous waste
  • To know how to store hazardous waste
  • To know how to minimize hazardous waste

4
Office of Environmental Health SafetyWEBSITE
  • www.som.tulane.edu/oehs

5
OEHS Website TopicsThese are some of the topics
and links that can be found on the OEHS website
  • Biological Safety
  • Laser Safety
  • Radiation Safety
  • Ergonomics
  • General Safety
  • OEHS Policies Procedures Manual
  • Material Safety Data Sheets
  • Chemical Safety
  • Hazardous Materials Waste
  • Fire Safety
  • Departmental Safety Representatives

6
OEHS Website Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
Link
  • Material Safety Data Sheets are available on the
    OEHS website under the MSDS link
  • MSDSs are documents provided by the manufacturer
    that tell you about a chemical and how to protect
    yourself

7
OEHS Website - Chemical Safety LinkThis is some
of the information available under the Chemical
Safety link of the OEHS website
  • Chemical Inventory Form
  • Incompatible Chemical List
  • Lab Hoods
  • Lab Door Labels
  • Compressed Gas Cylinders
  • Ethyl Ether
  • Annual Lab Safety Documentation Forms
  • OSHA Formaldehyde Standard Guide
  • OSHA Hazard Communication Standard Guide
  • OSHA Lab Standard/Chemical Hygiene Plan Guide

8
Prudent Practices in the Laboratory
  • National Research Council
  • This is an excellent, highly recommended
    reference of laboratory safety information- now
    available online at www.nap.edu/catalog/4911.html

9
Safety in Academic Chemistry LaboratoriesLess
is Better Laboratory Chemical Management for
Waste Reduction
  • Publications from the American Chemical Society -
  • Available online at http//membership.acs.org/c/cc
    s/pubs/SACL_faculty.pdf
  • http//membership.acs.org/c/ccs/pubs/less_is_bette
    r.pdf

10
Hawleys Condensed Chemical DictionaryThe Merck
IndexChemical AbstractsThese are additional
sources of chemical safety information.
11
Regulatory WebsitesThese sites contain safety
information and references to regulations. Some,
like OSHA, even provide online training on
various topics.
  • www.osha.gov Occupational Safety and Health
    Administration website
  • www.epa.gov Environmental Protection Agency
    website
  • www.bt.cdc.gov bioterrorism site of Centers for
    Disease Control
  • www.cdc.gov/niosh - Centers for Disease Control/
    NIOSH website
  • www.dot.gov Department of Transportation
    website

12
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARD29 CFR 1910.1450
13
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARD
  • The OSHA Occupational Exposures to Hazardous
    Chemicals in Laboratories Standard, or
    Laboratory Standard for short, requires employers
    to protect laboratory workers from health hazards
    associated with chemical exposure in the
    laboratory.

14
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDCHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN
(CHP)
  • A requirement of the OSHA Lab Standard is for all
    employers that have laboratories to develop a
    written Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP).
  • Tulanes CHP is located in the Laboratory Safety
    section of the OEHS Policies Procedures Manual
    which can be found at the OEHS website,
    www.som.tulane.edu/oehs.

15
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDCHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN
(CHP)
  • Tulanes CHP is a generic plan covering the many
    different types of laboratories at Tulane.
  • It is to be supplemented by annually updated
    Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) developed by
    laboratory supervisors/principal investigators
    discussing safety practices and procedures
    specific to the laboratory.

16
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDCHEMICAL HYGIENE OFFICER
(CHO)
  • The Lab Standard also requires each employer with
    laboratories to appoint a Chemical Hygiene
    Officer.
  • The certified CHO for Tulane University is Pam
    Fatland of OEHS.

17
OSHA HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HAZCOM) STANDARD29
CFR 1910.1200
18
OSHA HAZARD COMMUNICATION STANDARD
  • States You Have a Right to Know about Chemical
    Hazards in the Workplace and How to Protect
    Yourself
  • Tulane has a Written Hazard Communication Plan
    located in the OEHS Policies and Procedures
    Manual (see the OEHS website www.som.tulane.edu/oe
    hs)
  • A Supervisors Guide to the OSHA Hazard
    Communication (HAZCOM) Standard is available on
    the OEHS Website under the Chemical Safety Link

19
OSHA HAZARD COMMUNICATION STANDARD
  • Under the OSHA HAZCOM standard, manufacturers of
    chemicals are required to evaluate the hazards of
    the chemicals they produce and transmit that
    information to customers on labels and Material
    Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)

20
Become Familiar with Chemicals inYour Laboratory
  • Chemical Inventory
  • Container Labels
  • Laboratory Door Signs
  • Material Safety Data Sheets
  • Reference Materials
  • Training

21
PURPOSE OF UPDATING CHEMICAL INVENTORY
  • To verify that you have Material Safety Data
    Sheets (MSDSs) you need in the work area and that
    OEHS library of MSDSs is complete
  • Emergency Responders need inventory for
    emergencies, such as fires and spills, and for
    planning purposes
  • To perform a hazard evaluation of the area,
    obtain appropriate PPE, verify proper storage and
    that containers are in good condition and not
    expired

22
PURPOSE OF UPDATING CHEMICAL INVENTORY
  • Tulane is required to report inventory to local,
    state, and federal agencies such as the EPA, the
    State Police, and the Fire Department
  • Fees based on the inventory must be paid to
    regulatory agencies (Example City of New Orleans
    Hazardous Materials Tax which helps to support
    the Fire Depts HAZMAT unit)

23
CHEMICAL LABELS Required Information
  • Full Chemical Name
  • Physical and Health Hazards (Flammable,
    Corrosive, Toxic)
  • Manufacturer Name/Address/Phone Number (on
    incoming containers)

24
CHEMICAL LABELS Required Information
  • Labels are required on all incoming containers,
    all transfer containers that will be left for a
    period of time, and on all containers that will
    be used by more than one person
  • You can label an entire shelf instead of each
    individual container if all containers on the
    shelf contain the same thing (Ex. specimen
    containers of ethanol)
  • Labels must be legible, in English with the full
    name of the chemical spelled out (no symbols or
    abbreviations)

25
CHEMICAL LABELS Required Information
  • The purpose of labeling is to identify the
    material and to become aware of the hazards and
    the methods of protection
  • Sometimes OSHA requires special wording to appear
    on the label of certain chemicals or at the
    entrance to a regulated area (Ex. Formaldehyde
    containers must say Irritant and Potential
    Cancer Hazard)

26
More Chemical Label InformationSometimes labels
contain other information that serve to enhance
the hazard warnings and identify means of
protection
  • Signal Word (e.g., Danger, Warning, Caution)
  • First Aid Procedures
  • Handling Storage (e.g., Avoid contact with
    Acids)
  • Special Instructions (e.g., Keep out of reach of
    children, Use with adequate ventilation)

27
Chemical Labeling SystemsOptional information
which may be found on a container label
  • The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
    uses a color-coded diamond with a numerical
    rating system to identify the degree of health
    (blue), fire (red), or reactivity (yellow)
    hazards associated with a chemical in a fire
    situation. A zero means minimal hazards whereas
    a four indicates severe hazards.

28
Chemical Labeling SystemsOptional information
which may be found on a container label
  • The National Paint and Coatings Association uses
    the Hazardous Materials Identification System
    (HMIS), a similar system of labeling which rates
    chemicals from zero to four on their health
    (blue), flammability (red), reactivity (yellow),
    and also gives personal protective equipment
    designations.

29
Improper Labeling
30
Improper Labeling - Abbreviations
31
LABORATORY DOOR SIGNSSignage for laboratory
doors stating the hazards found in the lab and
emergency contact information are available from
OEHS
  • Door sign request forms available on OEHS website
    www.som.tulane.edu/oehs under the Chemical Safety
    link form can also be used for updates of
    current signs
  • Signs contain stickers relating to hazards found
    in that laboratory (Example Flammable,
    Corrosive, Water Reactive)
  • Signs also contain authorized admittance/emergency
    contact information which should be used before
    entering a lab or during an emergency to contact
    appropriate personnel
  • Copies of signage forms are kept in OEHS for
    emergency response purposes

32
DEFINITIONSFamiliarize yourself with terms found
on chemical labels/MSDSs
  • Under MSDS link of OEHS Website
    www.som.tulane.edu/oehs see
  • MSDS HyperGlossary - http//www.ilpi.com/msds/re
    f/

33
DEFINITIONS
  • CARCINOGEN - Can cause cancer
  • CORROSIVE - Can cause destruction of living
    tissue (e.g., acids, caustics)
  • EXPLOSIVE - Can cause release of pressure, gas,
    and heat
  • FLAMMABLE - Can burn when ignition source and air
    are present

34
DEFINITIONS
  • IRRITANT - Can cause reversible inflammatory
    effect (e.g., eyes water, itching)
  • OXIDIZER - Promotes combustion oxygen
  • SENSITIZER - Can cause an allergic reaction in
    some people
  • TOXIC - Can cause health effect

35
Physical Hazards
  • Flammable
  • Combustible
  • Oxidizer
  • Organic Peroxide
  • Water Reactive
  • Explosive
  • Reactive
  • Pyrophoric
  • Compressed gas
  • Radioactive

36
Health Hazards
  • Irritant
  • Sensitizer
  • Corrosive
  • Toxic Acute, Chronic
  • Carcinogen
  • Reproductive Toxin

37
ROUTES OF ENTRYChemicals can enter the body in a
number of ways. Depending on how the chemical
enters the body, you may need respiratory
protection, skin protection such as gloves or
aprons, or face and eye protection such as face
shields and goggles.
  • INHALATION Nose
  • INGESTION Mouth
  • SKIN CONTACT Skin, Eyes
  • INJECTION Skin (subcutaneous vs. dermal)

38
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS (MSDSs)
  • MSDSs are documents that inform you of the
    hazards associated with a chemical and how to
    protect yourself from those hazards
  • MSDSs must be readily accessible to employees in
    the work area where the chemicals are used
  • Each company publishes its own MSDSs with their
    address and emergency contact information. Thus
    if you have a chemical such as acetone from two
    different manufacturers, you will need an MSDS
    from each company

39
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS (MSDSs) (The
following are types of information that can be
found on an MSDS)
  • Identity
  • Ingredients
  • Physical Properties
  • Hazards
  • Physical
  • Health
  • Precautions
  • Storage
  • Control Measures
  • Disposal
  • Spills
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

40
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS - ACQUISITION
  • Manufacturers are required to ship MSDSs to
    Tulane with the first shipment of a chemical
  • OEHS maintains a hard-copy library of all MSDSs
    received from the manufacturers and all chemicals
    listed on the inventories that are submitted.
    The OEHS library of MSDSs is kept at the OEHS
    office downtown
  • MSDSs are also available on the OEHS website
    www.som.tulane.edu/oehs under the MSDS link
  • The OEHS website/MSDS link also contains FAX
    numbers for common chemical manufacturers
  • Contact OEHS if you have trouble finding an MSDS
    that you need

41
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS ACQUISITIONWays to
Obtain MSDSs at Tulane
  • OEHS Website www.som.tulane.edu/oehs then click
    on the MSDS link
  • Online MSDS collections
  • Online Manufacturer Links
  • Manufacturer FAX numbers
  • Other University Websites
  • OEHS Library of hard copies of MSDSs

42
ELECTRONIC MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETSOSHA now
recognizes that MSDSs can be kept electronically
in the work area, if all of these criteria are
met
  • All employees must be trained on how to obtain
    MSDSs
  • You must be able to print MSDSs
  • You must have an alternative to obtaining MSDSs
    in the event of power loss or other emergency
    (Contact OEHS Library of MSDSs)

43
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDTRAINING INFORMATION
TOPICSThe OSHA Lab Standard States that you must
be familiar with the following
  • Methods to detect hazardous chemicals in the work
    area
  • Signs and symptoms of exposure to chemicals
  • Methods to reduce exposure
  • Physical health hazards of chemicals used in
    the work area
  • PPE and emergency procedures
  • CHP/SOPs reference materials

44
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDDetecting Hazardous
Chemicals
  • Permissible Exposure Limits
  • Signs symptoms of exposure to chemicals
  • Odors/Leaks/Spills
  • Monitoring exposure

45
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROLThere
are three main ways to control exposure to
chemicals
  • Engineering Controls (usually consists of
    ventilation, safety showers/eyewash units, etc.)
  • Work Practices (handling, storage, housekeeping,
    etc.)
  • Personal Protective Equipment (gloves, eye/face
    protection, etc.)

46
CHEMICAL FUME HOODS
  • Designed to protect the worker from toxic or
    hazardous chemicals
  • 100 of air exhausted to outside
  • No recirculation of air
  • Baffles in back should adjust for work with
    chemicals of different volatilities and vapor
    densities

47
CHEMICAL FUME HOODS
  • All chemical fume hoods at Tulane must have an
    alarm or airflow indicator device on them to show
    that they are operating properly
  • Most chemical fume hoods should have a face
    velocity in the range of 80-100 fpm

48
Fume Hood Alarm
49
CHEMICAL FUME HOODS
  • Do not assume that your fume hood is operating
    properly. Check the alarm indicator. At the
    very least, use a piece of tissue paper and make
    sure it is drawn inward. IF NOT OPERATING
    PROPERLY, DISCONTINUE WORK WITH HAZARDOUS OR
    TOXIC CHEMICALS!

50
FUME HOOD SAFETY TIPS
  • Keep the sash as low as possible
  • Work at least 6 inches inside hood
  • Keep work surface clear of unnecessary items
  • Keep baffles clear of obstructions elevate
    large equipment off work surface

51
FUME HOOD SAFETY TIPS
  • Avoid rapid movement into and in front of hood
  • Pedestrian traffic in front of hood creates
    turbulence and can pull vapors out of hood and
    into operators breathing zone

52
FUME HOOD SAFETY TIPS
  • Keep the amount of material in a hood to a
    minimum excessive clutter increases turbulence
    and reduces hood efficiency
  • An airfoil helps to minimize undesirable
    turbulence when air entering the hood impacts the
    front edge of the floor of the hood be sure
    airfoil is installed and side panels are in place

53
FUME HOOD SAFETY TIPS
  • Secure loose lightweight objects such as paper
    towels
  • Run water in hood drains often to reduce odors
    that may develop in p-trap
  • Ensure adequate illumination in hood
  • Be aware that opening and closing lab doors can
    affect hood performance

54
FUME HOOD SAFETY TIPS
  • Keep the sash clean and unobstructed
  • Place cords and hoses under the airfoil so sash
    can be kept closed
  • Practice good housekeeping
  • Clean chemical residues and spills from interior
    hood surfaces

55
FUME HOOD SAFETY TIPS
  • Do not place absorbent paper under heating
    appliances
  • Do not place incompatible chemicals together
  • Remember the emptier the hood, the better air
    currents can flow through it! Do not use hood as
    storage cabinet.

56
CANOPY VENTILATION
  • May be 100 Exhausted to outside, but not
    recommended for chemical use
  • Draws fumes past workers breathing zone
  • Best used for heat removal such as in a kitchen

57
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL
EYEWASHES/SHOWERS
  • Eyewash fountains are required in work areas
    where formaldehyde, irritants, or corrosive
    chemicals are used and there is the potential for
    a splash to the eye.
  • Eyewashes must be tested weekly by the laboratory
    personnel. Showers must be tested at least
    annually by Facilities Services.

58
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL
EYEWASHES/SHOWERS
  • Emergency showers/eyewashes must be readily
    accessible, clear of obstructions, and clearly
    labeled.

59
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL WORK
PRACTICES
  • Laboratory technique is important in minimizing
    exposure to hazardous chemicals.
  • There is no substitute for adequate planning and
    knowledge when using hazardous materials.

60
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL WORK
PRACTICES
  • Practice good housekeeping.
  • Maintain aisles/uncluttered work areas.
  • Properly store handle chemicals.
  • Substitute less hazardous materials when possible
    (such as non-mercury thermometers).
  • Scale down experiments.
  • Use secondary containment.
  • Use good chemical hygiene practices.

61
Poor Housekeeping
62
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL WORK
PRACTICES
  • Obtaining Chemicals
  • Transporting Chemicals
  • Storing Chemicals
  • Minimizing Exposure
  • Proper Labeling

63
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL WORK
PRACTICESCHEMICAL STORAGE
  • Practice good housekeeping
  • Use shelves with lips, flammable cabinets if
    available
  • Segregate by hazard class
  • Dispose of deteriorating, old, or unneeded
    chemicals
  • Minimize purchases order only what is needed
  • Avoid storing on floor and in fume hood use
    secondary containment
  • Keep containers capped and properly labeled

64
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL WORK
PRACTICESGAS STORAGE
  • Properly secure gas cylinders
  • Make sure cylinders have protective cap in place
    unless attached to a regulator

65
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL WORK
PRACTICESTOXIC/HIGH RISK CHEMICALS
  • Use in a designated area
  • Use containment devices such as a fume hood
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • Decontaminate work area
  • Have an emergency plan

66
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
  • PPE is used as a final alternative in the event
    that engineering controls and work practices do
    not adequately prevent exposure to chemicals.
  • PPE must be adequate for the substance being
    handled and must be available in different
    sizes/styles (i.e., powdered unpowdered gloves).

67
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
  • PPE must be inspected to make sure it is in good
    condition.
  • Personnel must be trained on PPE, how and when to
    use it, how to maintain and store it, etc.

68
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
  • A Dartmouth researcher got one drop of
    dimethylmercury on her latex glove and died from
    the exposure. Latex was not appropriate for
    protection for work with dimethylmercury.
  • Latex or PVC gloves are not suitable for direct
    contact with corrosive or highly toxic chemicals.
  • Glove permeability charts are available from
    glove manufacturers to help you decide which type
    of glove is appropriate for use with different
    chemicals. Contact OEHS for more information or
    if you have questions.

69
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
  • If gloves are reusable, clean and inspect them
    after use. Store them in a manner in which they
    will not become torn or damaged.
  • If gloves are disposable, or if they are torn or
    in poor condition, dispose of them in appropriate
    trash container. Do not throw on floor or leave
    dirty gloves on counters.

70
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
  • Respirators require a medical evaluation and
    annual fit-testing.
  • Respirators should only be used if engineering
    and work practice controls cannot adequately
    control a chemical exposure.
  • Contact OEHS immediately if you feel a respirator
    may be needed in your area.

71
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
  • Respirators require adherence to a strict
    respiratory protection program.
  • When requested, OEHS will monitor area to help
    determine if respirators may be required. In
    most cases, exposure to chemicals can be
    controlled by alternative methods.

72
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
  • Regular prescription eyeglasses do not take the
    place of safety glasses or goggles.
  • The American Chemical Society has taken the
    position that contact lenses may be worn in the
    laboratory as long as appropriate eye protection
    such as safety glasses or goggles, as required of
    other workers in the laboratory, is also worn.

73
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
  • Safety glasses and goggles should be stored in a
    manner in which they will not become dirty or
    scratched, such as in a drawer or cabinet, or in
    a plastic bag. They should not be left on the
    counter or hung by their straps.

74
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEXPOSURE CONTROL
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
  • In addition to wearing suitable PPE, a laboratory
    worker must also dress appropriately for their
    work. For example, sandals/flip-flops, shorts,
    and tops with exposed midriffs are inappropriate
    attire for laboratory work with hazardous
    materials.

75
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEMERGENCY PROCEDURES
  • In the event of an emergency
  • Evacuate the area
  • Contact Public Safety and OEHS immediately
  • Be familiar with your Emergency Action Plan (EAP)
    evacuation policy, procedures, and escape
    routes see your Departmental Safety
    Representative for more information

76
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEMERGENCY PROCEDURES
FIRE SUPPRESSION
  • Before using a fire extinguisher
  • Make sure you have an unobstructed escape route
    at your back
  • Fire should be small, confined, and not spreading
    (e.g., trash can fire)
  • Know that the extinguisher is the right type for
    the job
  • Know how to use an extinguisher

77
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEMERGENCY PROCEDURES
FIRE SUPPRESSION
  • To use a portable fire extinguisher, remember
    PASS
  • Pull the pin
  • Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire
  • Squeeze the handles
  • Sweep from side to side

78
OSHA LABORATORY STANDARDEMERGENCY PROCEDURES
FIRE RESPONSE
  • HOW TO RESPOND TO A FIRE IN YOUR AREA
  • FOLLOW THE ACRONYM, E S C A P E
  • E EVALUATE the situation
  • S SECURE THE AREA Remove occupants
  • C CLOSE THE DOORS to contain the fire
  • A ACTIVATE THE FIRE ALARM use the nearest
    pull station
  • P PHONE THE DESIGNATED EMERGENCY NUMBER
  • Uptown Campus dial 865-5200 or X5200
  • E EXTINGUISH THE FIRE using a portable fire
    extinguisher, if you determine it is safe to do
    so (fire is small and not spreading, fire
    doesnt come between you and the exit, etc.)

79
BUILDING BLOCKS OF LABORATORY SAFETY
  • Make safety a top priority
  • Make information available and accessible (MSDSs,
    safety literature, etc.)
  • Use equipment appropriate for the task
  • Be watchful during experiments be ready for
    unexpected events
  • Substitute less hazardous substances when
    possible, or use other methods such as robotics

80
BUILDING BLOCKS OF LABORATORY SAFETY
  • Avoid close calls and doing something just this
    once
  • Do not procrastinate (get equipment repaired, buy
    needed PPE, etc.)

81
HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT
82
What Is A Hazardous Waste?
  • Any hazardous substance that meets the EPA
    classifications of the following
  • Flammable
  • Corrosive
  • Reactive
  • Toxic
  • Items received with hazardous shipping labels
    will most likely become hazardous waste

83
What Is A Hazardous Waste?
  • Check the Material Safety Data Sheet to help
    determine if your waste chemical is a hazardous
    waste

84
What Is Hazardous Waste?
Any of these keywords usually indicate the waste
materials will be hazardous waste
  • Flammable
  • Inflammable
  • Flashpoint (lt140 F)
  • Corrosive, Acid, Basic, Caustic
  • Explosive
  • Stench Agent
  • Oxidizer
  • Water or air Reactive, Pyrophoric, Peroxide
    Former
  • Poison

85
Empty Containers
  • Empty containers are not considered as hazardous
    waste. They can be tossed in the solid waste
    disposal receptacle after the label has been
    removed or defaced.

86
Hazardous waste disposal rules
  • 1. Minimize
  • 2. Containerize
  • 3. Label
  • 4. Store less than 30 days

87
Rule 1 - Minimize
  • By law, a Waste minimization program is
    required. Among ways this goal is accomplished
    is by
  • Source reduction (ordering less)
  • Surplus chemical redistribution
  • Labeling all containers (disposal of unknowns is
    expensive)
  • Redistilling solvents
  • Using mercury-free instruments
  • Substituting hazardous chemicals with
    non-hazardous chemicals
  • Using secondary containment

88
How you can help minimize costs
  • DONT MIX WASTES
  • Only compatible waste solvents should be mixed
    together in the appropriate waste container
  • Dont mix acids and flammable materials together
  • Dont mix biological and chemical waste
  • Dont mix radioactive and chemical waste
  • These practices can reduce the cost of disposing
    various types of hazardous waste.

89
How you can help to minimize waste
  • Neutralizing Acids
  • Acidic waste can be sewer disposed after
    neutralization, but we need to know what else may
    be in it -- i.e. heavy metals (like Mercury,
    Lead, Chromium, Cadmium, Selenium or Barium),
    flammable liquids, and poisons. Acids with other
    regulated hazardous ingredients CAN NOT be sewer
    disposed.

90
Rule 2 - Containerize
  • Only use containers that are compatible to the
    hazardous waste.
  • Make sure that all containers remain closed
    except when hazardous waste is being added.
    Remove funnels and be sure to cap containers
    after adding waste.

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Waste Containers
  • Chemical waste generated at each generators work
    site should be kept in a rigid, compatible
    container until it is shipped for disposal.
  • The chemical waste is collected by lab personnel
    and should not be stored for more than one month.

Be sure waste chemicals are compatible with the
container.
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Keep waste containers closed
  • Keep waste containers closed except when adding
    waste.

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Containerize
  • Chemical waste in general, and hazardous waste in
    particular, must be stored in a sturdy container,
    free of leaks.
  • OEHS will not accept open containers for
    hazardous waste disposal.

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Secondary Containment
Secondary Containment
  • To contain hazardous waste if the container
    leaks, the hazardous waste container should be
    kept in secondary containment such as a tray or
    tub.

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Containers
  • Cans of paint without lids, leaky ballasts,
    broken thermometers and chemically contaminated
    items must be overpacked into another container
    which is free of leaks so we can put it on a cart
    and roll the cart safely over campus sidewalks to
    the storage facility.

96
Rule 3 - Labeling Why you must label waste
containers
  • Waste containers are required by law to be
    labeled
  • So Environmental Health and Safety knows how to
    process the waste
  • Because Environmental Health and Safety cannot
    pick up unknowns
  • Because unknowns are very expensive to ship for
    disposal

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When should you label your waste container?
  • The DATE waste is first put into the container
    must be on the label along with the name of the
    chemical.
  • As EACH NEW container of hazardous waste is
    filled, the name of that chemical must be
    placed on that container.

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Labeling
  • Please do not rely on the hazardous waste person
    picking up your waste to label your containers.
  • Include anything unusual on the label, even if in
    small quantity (examples reactive and explosive
    chemicals, PCBs, dioxins, extremely toxic
    chemicals, etc.)

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Hazardous Waste Labeling
  • Do not use chemical symbols, abbreviations, or
    codes for waste identification
  • In addition to the full chemical name, you must
    list the hazards associated with the waste, such
    as flammable, corrosive, etc.
  • The words Hazardous Waste must appear on the
    label
  • Hazardous waste labels are available through OEHS

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Rule 4 Store Less Than 30 DaysCall 988-2865 to
request a waste pick-up
Please provide the following information
  • your name
  • your phone number or e-mail address
  • location of the waste (building name room )
  • whether you need any empty waste containers

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Tulane UniversityOffice of Environmental Health
Safety (OEHS)Pam Fatland/Bruce McClueManager,
Chemical Safety/Hazardous Waste
Supervisor(504)988-2800/ (504)988-2865www.som.tu
lane.edu.oehspfatlan_at_tulane.edu /
bmcclue_at_tulane.eduIf unable to proceed to quiz,
type the link below into your browserhttp//auror
a.tcs.tulane.edu/ehs/enterssn.cfm?testnum35
Proceed to Quiz
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