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Assessing Scientific Inquiry

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Understand that knowledge of the scoring guide is needed to elicit scorable student work. ... Embarrassing. Enter the Scientific Inquiry Scoring Guide... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Learn more at: http://www.ode.state.or.us
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Title: Assessing Scientific Inquiry


1
Assessing Scientific Inquiry
  • Presented by

2
Goals for Scoring Sessions
  • Learn to reliably score student work using the
    Scoring Guide.
  • Understand that knowledge of the scoring guide is
    needed to elicit scorable student work.
  • Score student work--anchor papers, new
    candidate anchor papers and your own students
    work.
  • Have fun and learn from each other!

3
A Science Challenge!
  • What do you know about straws and how you can use
    them to move objects?
  • We claim Characteristics of the straw will
    control how far you can blow the cotton ball
  • Carry out a quick investigation (10 minutes)
  • As a team, report your findings to the group.

4
Assessing Your Inquiry
  • Fantastic!
  • Good
  • So-so
  • Needs work
  • Embarrassing

5
Enter the Scientific Inquiry Scoring Guide
  • It defines the important aspects of a task,
  • provides clear assessment guidance,
  • and promotes uniformity of assessment and
    feedback to students/teachers.

6
Oregon's Scientific Inquiry Scoring Guide
  • Was developed to include the following
  • Science content mastery as assessed with a
    standardized knowledge and skills test and
  • Science process which must be experienced and
    practiced.
  • Process (via work sample) is assessed using the
    scoring guide

7
What are the scoring dimensions?
  • 4 Dimensions
  • Forming a Question or Hypothesis
  • Designing an Investigation
  • Collecting and Presenting
  • Analyzing and Interpreting Results
  • Can you build the scoring guide?.. Puzzle Activity

8
A, N, C Pattern
 
9
A,N,CThe Mysterious Threads
  • What do the Threads represent?
  • Why were they created?
  • Which are more important?

10
A, N, C
  • A Application of Scientific Knowledge
  • N Nature of Scientific Inquiry
  • C Communication

11
Scientific Inquiry in Your Classroom
  • Which dimensions do you already spend the most
    time doing in the classroom?
  • Activity Chart your own classroom
    investigations into a dimension.

12
Scientific Inquiry
  • Scoring Scale

6
Exemplary
5
Strong
4
Proficient
3 Developing
2 Emerging
1 Beginning
13
Scientific Inquiry Key Distinctions
  • Within the Threadswhat differentiates a 3 and a
    4?

14
Important Issues!
  • What do we mean by preponderance of evidence?
  • Can evidence from throughout the work be used to
    score each dimension?
  • Did you know, beginning this year, one work
    sample is required per year beginning in 4th
    grade?
  • Phase In Schedule and Work Sample Guidelines and
    FAQ documents are located in Science Teaching
    Learning to Standards http//www.ode.state.or.us/t
    ls/science/

15
OK, OK Lets do some scoring already!But first,
some rules.
  • Rules of the Road for scoring
  • We are not here to change the guide.
  • We are not here to dispute the anchor papers or
    the tasks.
  • We ARE here to understand that experienced
    teachers have reached scoring consensus.
  • We ARE here to calibrate our scoring.

16
Scoring the First Anchor Paper!
  • The anchor paper for each Benchmark
  • Met the Standards in each dimension
  • Why this score?
  • Make notes and discuss with a partner.

17

18
Scoring to Improve Student Success Words of
Wisdom
  • Assessment is only truly successful when
    results are used to improve instruction for
    individual students.
    -Johnson, 1987

19
Remember the rules
  • Rules of the Road for scoring
  • We are not here to change the guide.
  • We are not here to dispute the anchor papers or
    the tasks.
  • We ARE here to understand that experienced
    teachers have reached scoring consensus.
  • We ARE here to calibrate our scoring.

20
Scoring more papers
  • Remaining Anchor papers
  • Score each paper (whole numbersbe braveand
    dont peek!)
  • Compare at table, reach consensus?
  • Tally scores/reveal anchor scores
  • Be sure to align yourself with consensus scores.

21
Scientific InquiryDocumentation Sheet
22
Scientific InquiryScoring Sheet
23
Learning from student work
  • What do we tell the student?
  • What do we learn as the teacher? How does
    this inform our instruction?
  • T-CHART the feedback

24
End of Session 2 ?
25
Goals for Session 3
  • Introduce formative assessment
  • Provide Research Base
  • Develop and apply process for formative assessment

26
Formative Assessment and the Scoring Guide
  • Scoring Guide is intended to be more than a final
    assessment tool.
  • Teachers and Students both can improve inquiry
    skills through use of the scoring guide.

27
Value of Feedback
  • Research suggests FEEDBACK is MORE important than
    grades.

28
Research Basis of Formative Assessment
  • Writing assignment with students using
    well-known scoring criteria
  • Three treatments - Students received
  • Grades alone
  • Grades feedback
  • Feedback alone
  • Performance improved only in group that received
    feedback alone!
  • ( Butler,R. 1987 and 1988)

29
The Role of Formative Assessment in Inquiry
  • Student work
  • Scoring guide
  • Scores Feedback
  • (For state/district) (For students/teachers)

30
Formative Assessment Process
Targeted Oregon Science Standards Student
Inquiry Work ID gaps between standards and
student work Classroom Instruction?
Student Performance? What should we do? What
should students do?
31
Practicing Feedback
  • Look at the chosen piece of student work
  • Use Highlighting colors
  • Make notes as you identify gaps note
    implications for both student and teacher.
  • T-chart recording

32
Classroom Issues
  • Time to score PLUS time to generate feedback
  • Who provides feedback ( can students help each
    other)?
  • Forms of feedback

33
The Journey Continues
For more information contact Leslie Phillips,
Office of Assessment and Evaluation, Oregon
Department of Education leslie.phillips_at_state.or.u
s or 503-378-3600 Ext. 2317
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