AWSPWASA Summer Conference 2008 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – AWSPWASA Summer Conference 2008 PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 17cbd6-ZDc1Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

AWSPWASA Summer Conference 2008

Description:

2007-08 most challenging year ever for secondary schools ... Besides the devastating news of the cancer, Jane* knew this surgery and the ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:17
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 35
Provided by: shirleys
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: AWSPWASA Summer Conference 2008


1
AWSP/WASA Summer Conference 2008
  • Beyond 2008 Continuing Our Outstanding Success

Dr. Terry BergesonSuperintendent of Public
Instruction
2
SPECIAL THANKS to district leaderswho are
retiring
3
SPECIAL THANKSto our superintendents and
district leaders who continue to lead the charge
4
SPECIAL THANKSto our elementary and middle
school leaders
5
SPECIAL THANKSto our high school principals,
assistant principals,counselors, teachers
6
2007-08 most challenging year ever for secondary
schools
  • Three new major graduation requirements
  • Increased personalized support needed to help
    students meet new requirements
  • Managed
  • 60,000 WASL retakes
  • 2,300 portfolios of student work
  • 400 WASL/grades comparisons
  • 1,400 SAT, ACT and PSAT test scores
  • 1,250 out-of-state waivers
  • Up to 26 potential options for students to meet
    state assessment requirements

7
Reality was a smashing success
We had great fears about Class of 2008
8
Class of 2008 The best-prepared class in
Washington state history
  • Top SAT and near top ACT performance in the
    nation
  • Advanced Placement participation has quadrupled
    over past 10 years and scores up substantially
    this year
  • Record numbers of students with record test
    scores are applying to state universities
  • All graduates have prepared a plan for their
    post-secondary success
  • Students completed incredible projects in their
    areas of passion

9
THE PAYOFF 92 of 2008 12th-graders met state
reading and writing graduation requirements
91.4
N 67,099
70.53 earned Certificate of Academic Achievement
or Certificate of Individual Achievement
8.6
10
Percent of students meeting standard in reading
and writing by race/ethnicity
Class of 2008 students who are classified as
12th-graders.
11
DECEMBER 2007 Credits bigger problem than test
for Class of 2008
A 13-district sample of how 10,297 class members
were doing
Credits OK means that by the beginning of the
2007-08 year students had earned at least 75 of
the credits needed to graduate in their school
district.
Percent of students
12
Mobility of the Class of 2008
Numbers are rounded to the nearest 500
81,000 started 9th grade in Washington public
high schools
OCT. 1, 2004

20,000 students transferred in from other states
and countries

10,000 students transferred out of state
BETWEEN OCT. 1, 2004AND OCT. 1, 2007

9,000 students dropped out in grades 9, 10 or
11

9,500 students reclassified into other grades
72,500 students classified as 2008 12th
gradersin Washington public high schools
OCT. 1, 2007

5,500 12th-grade dropouts, transfers in and
out and reclassifications
MAY 1, 2008
67,000 current 2008 12th-graders
13
Dropouts a continuing challenge
  • High school cohort dropout rate has averaged
    21 over last four years
  • Data so far suggest Class of 2008 dropout rate
    will be similar to or lower than previous classes
  • 9th-grade dropout rate has declined from 5.1 to
    3.7 over past four years personalizing
    education helps keep students engaged

14
GOAL Reduce dropout rate by investing in
personalized retention and retrieval programs
  • Problem Districts are closing some of their
    programs
  • Budget cuts
  • Problems with retrieval structure
  • Federal dropout stigma
  • Solutions Programs like Building Bridges
  • Build school, community and family partnerships
  • Increase communication among partners
  • Collect accurate data, and act on it

15
Where do we go from here?
  • Improve math and science learning
  • Improve and streamline our assessment system
  • Redesign our broken K-12 funding system
  • Fix No Child Left Behind introduce meaningful
    federal and state accountability

16
Math/science standards update
  • New K-8, high school math standards complete,
    statewide training underway
  • Math curriculum decisions
  • Stage one of alignment study complete
  • District support/training package by fall
  • High school standards training at summer
    institute
  • Science standards redesign underway

TO LEARN MORE OSPI Summer Institute July 29
August 1, Tacoma
17
Improving and streamlining the assessment system
  • Key improvements coming in 2009
  • Shorter tests in grades 3-8 with fewer short
    answer and extended response questions
  • Fewer sessions in grades 3-5 math and science
  • End result Less time required for grades 3-8
    testing during three-week WASL testing window
  • No changes in high school tests

18
Create a new funding system to support student
success
GOAL Match our resources to our values for our
students and the educators who support them
19
Problems with existing funding system
  • Not enough money
  • Inequities in funding distribution
  • No system of targeting funds where money needed
    most
  • No incentives for reaching goals
  • Inappropriate inflation adjustors

20
Strengthening our funding system A three-part
proposal
  • Educator support funding
  • Professional development and compensation for
    teachers
  • Student support funding
  • Class sizes Struggling students (new LAP)
    English language learners
  • Navigation 101 (student guidance) Counseling
    and social supports
  • Student health Career and technical education
  • School libraries
  • Foundation support/district operations funding
  • School district operating costs
  • Classified staff

21
Professional development and compensation
proposals
GOAL Maintain and enhance high-quality teaching
by strengthening professional support and moving
toward recognition/pay based on knowledge and
skills
  • Invest in the front end (mentoring, etc.)
  • Provide full state funding for professional
    development days to ensure equity, and focus use
    of those days
  • Create tiered system of pay, a career lattice,
    where knowledge and skills are recognized

22
Struggling students need more focused help
  • Learning Assistance Program is current major
    support for struggling students
  • PRO Included in basic education funding
  • CON No structure to program
  • New funding proposal redesigns LAP to create
  • Differentiated class sizes
  • Tiered intervention programs built on successful
    models (such as Reading First)

23
Enhanced support for ELL students
GOAL Help students learning English as a second
language master language and academic content
  • Reduce ELL class sizes to 18 students
  • Provide extra funding to districts with high
    percentages of ELL students or more than nine
    first languages spoken by students
  • Enhance middle and high school ELL funding
  • Provide two more days of ELL-focused professional
    development
  • Fund enhanced instructional materials

24
Spokane School Districts ELL allocation sources
25
ELLs exiting Spokane program
Percent meeting or exceeding standard, WASL 2007
reading
26
Enhanced graduation support
GOAL Create comprehensive guidance programs to
help middle and high school students and their
parents navigate high school graduation
requirements
  • Continue and increase grants to implement
    Navigation 101 at all middle and high schools
  • Provide state funding to support one counselor
    per 350 students at all middle and high schools
  • Provide state funding to support one graduation
    advisor per 1,000 students in high schools

27
School operations proposals
GOAL Expand state funds to cover business costs
of school district operations
  • Increase funding for school district operating
    costs to 1,383 per student
  • More than double allocation for utilities to
    252/student
  • 126/student to update textbooks and other
    curriculum materials every six years
  • Phase in costs to increase use of technology in
    classroom
  • Significantly expand support for district
    business functions
  • Use market inflation factors for such things as
    utilities to reflect real operating costs

28
School operations Classified staff
  • Provide equitable allocations for classified
    staff categories (17/1,000 increased to
    25/1,000)
  • Allocate salaries for staff categories consistent
    with state employee salaries
  • Maintenance workers avg 47,331 in state system

29
Other key proposals to be developed
  • Administrator salary allocations
  • Transportation, including emergency fuel funding
  • Special education
  • Facilities maintenance staff/non-employee-related
    costs

30
View, download OSPI funding presentation and
all supporting materials
www.k12.wa.us
31
Fixing NCLB
  • New President, new Dept. of Education, new law!
  • Create workable Washington model and get federal
    government to agree
  • Recognize improvement
  • Reduce testing burden
  • Ensure fairness for students with disabilities
    and English language learners
  • Deal with dropout/graduation issues that penalize
    schools
  • Increase funding
  • In the meantime, focus on spirit, not the
    negatives

32
Schools of distinction
  • 86 schools throughout the state were honored
    last fall for their outstanding efforts in
    raising student achievement in reading and math
  • Another round of schools and districts will be
    honored this fall

33
Thank you for your courage, your perseverance and
your belief in our students!
34
On June 12, 2008, my sister had cancer surgery.
Besides the devastating news of the cancer, Jane
knew this surgery and the extended hospital stay
would prevent her from attending her daughter
Sarahs graduation from Puyallup High School. I
decided to call to see if someone would volunteer
to perform Sarahs graduation in Janes hospital
room. Two and a half hours later, Dr. Mike
Joyner, wearing his robe and doctoral hood,
presented Sarahs diploma to her in front of Jane
and the family. Sarah wore her graduation cap and
gown to this event. In this day and age when all
we seem to hear is the bad news related to
schools, teachers and administrators, I just
wanted you to know that one of your high school
principals was a true humanitarian.
names changed
About PowerShow.com