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Title: BUSINESS AND HUMAN RIGHTS


1
BUSINESS AND HUMAN RIGHTS Possibilities for
learning and leadership by UN Global Compact
Mumbai Chapter August 21st 2009 A presentation
for discussion prepared by Mark Hodge, Director,
Global Business Initiative on Human RightsViraf
Mehta, Chief Executive, Partners in Change
2
  • INTRODUCTION
  • Context for this document This document has been
    prepared following the first meeting of the
    Global Compact Network, India Mumbai Chapter, on
    July 22nd 2009. A key theme in the meeting was
    to ensure the network goes beyond a place to meet
    and talk. The business leaders present mentioned
    that there are many opportunities for such
    interaction and so the key is to deliver
    concrete value and achieve practical
    outcomes. It was further recognized that
    focusing on UNGC principles that are less
    understood, most challenging to industry and
    where business practices are less developed in
    India would make sense. The two themes of human
    rights and anti-corruption were agreed and the
    mandate leading to this document was to develop
    ideas for what the group could or should aim to
    achieve in 12-months.
  • Purpose and Contents The main objective of this
    document is to support meaningful and intentional
    discussion at the second meeting of the Mumbai
    Chapter on August 21st 2009. Participants are
    encouraged to read the document in advance but we
    will also review each page in the meeting. The
    contents of the document is as follows
  • PART ONE Brief Introduction to Business and
    Human Rights Global and India developments
  • PART TWO Five Key Messages for businesses
    engaging in Human Rights
  • PART THREE Possibilities for action awareness,
    practice, deliverable and policy impact
  • PART FOUR Proposed agenda for session on August
    21st
  • About the authors This presentation was
    developed by Mark Hodge, Director, Global
    Business Initiative on Human Rights
    (www.global-business-initiative.org) and Viraf
    Mehta, Chief Executive, Partners in Change
    (www.picindia). Mark has worked in the area of
    Business and Human Rights for 5 years including
    strategy development work, board-level awareness
    raising, training, management tool development,
    facilitating multi-stakeholder processes and
    engagement in the global policy dialogue. Mark is
    a member of the UN Global Compact Human Rights
    working group. Viraf Mehta is a pioneer in CSR in
    India with two decades of experience both within
    industry (as part of Tata Steel), civil society
    and as an advisor to many policy developments and
    initiatives in across India and globally. Viraf
    has been a strong voice in the advocacy or human
    rights in business since his involvement in CSR.
  • .

3
.
QUESTIONS RAISED AT FIRST MEETING .
WHAT POLICY DEVELOPMENTS SHOULD WE MOVE TO
ACHIEVE OR IMPACT IN 12-MONTHS TIME?
QUESTION ONE
WHAT CONCRETE THING OR THINGS CAN WE DELIVER TO
OUR PEERS IN OUR SECTORS AND/OR INDUSTRY MORE
WIDELY?
QUESTION TWO
WHAT CAN WE DO TO RAISE THE BAR REGARDING OUR
OWN PRACTICES?
QUESTION THREE
4
PART ONE
BUSINES AND HUMAN RIGHTS
5
BUSINESS AND HUMAN RIGHTS .
  • Background Beginning in the mid-1990s, there has
    been a steady and rapid rise in the expectation
    of companies concerning their obligation to
    "respect human rights" that are fundamental to
    achieving company sustainability objectives.
    This expectation is coming from investors,
    employees, communities, NGOs and governments. The
    success of the UN Global Compact shows that
    business leaders are recognizing this trend
    with the first two principles of the compact
    placing a focus on human rights. Today, global
    companies in all industrial sectors are faced
    with three critical questions as to how to most
    effectively address human rights.  
  • What does respect for human rights mean in their
    business context?  
  • How to drive understanding of and integrate
    respect for human rights in the business, with
    business partners - and in the supply chain in
    all regions of the globe.
  • How to create a larger business voice to
    influence and lead the policy and process
    direction of "respect for human rights".

Recent Developments In recent years, we have
seen progress in answering these three questions
in a sensible and clear way. The United Nations
special representative on Business and Human
Rights has emphasized the role of the state to
protect human rights as well as provided guidance
on how a company should enact due diligence in
response to its human rights impacts. Various
voluntary initiatives bringing together major
brands with human rights NGOs and experts have
developed guidance, tools, frameworks and
principles on a number of subjects (for example,
to ensure private and public security personnel
do not violate human rights, the UNGC/BLIHR
Management Guide for Integrating Human Rights
into Business Practices, and good practices in
conflict or weak governance zones where
national law is silent or unenforced).
Investment, project finance institutions and
multi-lateral organisations are moving fast to
integrate human rights into their requirements of
clients. And, although understanding varies
considerably within the business community, UN
Global Compact members have all made a commitment
to respect human rights with the first two
principles reading Principle One Businesses
should support and respect the protection of
internationally proclaimed human rights and
Principle 2 Business should make sure that they
are not complicit in human rights abuses.
6
In India First, Indian business houses have many
policies and practices in place to ensure they
respect human rights. This includes in areas such
as Health and Safety (Right to a health and
safety workplace), Diversity (Right to
Non-Discrimination, Freedom of religion), and
Employee and Community training/development
(Right to education), Community programs (often
covering a range of rights such as health,
housing, education, security, access to
justice). It is also clear that the Indian
business community is widening application of
UNGC principles to look beyond the workplace to
suppliers, customers and all local communities.
Of course, in the past few decades it has been
shown that simply by being engines of economic
growth i.e. by doing business successfully,
corporations enable the realization of many
rights such as the right to work, right to
livelihood, and the right to an adequate standard
of living. Second, the democratic nature of
India means that institutions exist (whether part
of the government or civil society) that can in
principle enable citizens to exercise, claim
and when needed fight their rights. However, as
is the case in all corners of the world, abuse of
human rights continues to be a major problem in
India. In some instances, this is due to direct
malpractice by business (intentional sometimes
but often not) or by other actors (such as
government) seeking to enable business to operate
effectively and efficiently in line with wider
economic policies. These can directly or
indirectly (and indeed rightly or wrongly) lead
to operational disruption or inefficiencies,
attacks on infrastructure, security threats to
employees, negative reputation, reduced consumer
and employee loyalty, reduced access to capital,
stalled projects, entrenched conflict and legal
battles. Third, Indian industry is now a global
economic force with markets and operations beyond
Indian borders. The Business and Human Rights
agenda and indeed the UN Global Compact are
part of early attempts by the leader from all
sectors and around the world to achieve a global
consensus on what a socially and environmental
sustainable globalization looks like. The
approach of shared principles and norms appears
to be more powerful (and sensible for industry)
than a confused litany of baselines, laws and
practices. With this in mind, the Business and
Human Rights agenda takes on macro and strategic
significance. Finally, all the UNGC principles
are interconnected. Corruption ultimately leads
to loss of jobs in the private sector or reduced
public budgets to invest in infrastructure and
basic services (such as education, heath, clean
water etc). Similarly, climate change will impact
the most vulnerable in society with more force.
7
PART TWO
FIVE KEY MESSAGES
8
MESSAGE ONEHuman Rights in a business context
rarely concern the most egregious human rights
violations that dominate the international and
national media. So, the first important step is
to reduce any levels of fear or concern that the
language of human rights naturally creates.
MESSAGE TWOIf approached with the same rigor as
any other business activity, it will not take
long to understand and scope the ways in which a
single business has positive and negative impacts
upon human rights. Even where your company is not
the only actor in a given situation, this is an
important step. This can get rid of blind spots,
leading to effective risk mitigation, increased
confidence and successful commercial activities.
MESSAGE THREEThis is a business conversation
with real business concerns, risks and
opportunities for corporations to be mindful of.
This should not be treated as a soft topic or
activity that is nice to do. It is about doing
the right thing for the company as much as for
society.
MESSAGE FOUR There are some Frequently Asked
Questions that all business executives and
managers raise. Some of these are listed with
initial answers in this presentation.
MESSAGE FIVE Part One The path forward is very
clear and should not be over complicated. There
are practical things that companies can do as
part of a forward-plan that fit into the emerging
global policy consensus about what corporate
respect human rights looks like. Part Two There
are many tools but all could benefit strongly
from testing, input and improvement by the Indian
business community.
9
MESSAGE ONE
Human Rights in a business context rarely concern
the most egregious human rights violations that
dominate the international and national media.
So, the first important step is to reduce any
levels of fear or concern that the language of
human rights naturally creates.
DEFINITIONThe Universal Declaration on Human
Rights is the pre-eminent document outlining and
defining what human rights mean and are, with the
first half focusing on civil and political
rights and the second on economic, cultural and
social rights. For individuals in corporations
who are spear-heading initial efforts in this
area, it is worth reading this document.
Companies should consider all rights listed in
the interests of avoiding liability and the
creation of climates that are sustainable for
business investments. There has been much work to
translate this international human rights
language to clear guidance to business. Two
examples are Human Rights Translated developed by
a group of organizations including the UN Global
Compact http//human-rights.unglobalcompact.org/do
c/human_rights_translated.pdf and the BLIHR
Essential Steps http//blihr.zingstudios.com/data/
fe/file/ES20final20for20web.pdf SENSIBLE
SCOPE Following an understanding of the wider
context of human rights, a company will begin to
understand that certain rights are clearly
impacted by business operations and others are
rarely (never say never!) impacted directly by
any business anywhere. The former category will
likely include the right to work, freedom of
association, the right to water, the right to
health, freedom of expression, the right to
information, freedom of religion, right to
livelihood, right to education, right to a living
wage, right to food, right to non-discrimination
and these are often already dealt with in some
shape or form by the business. The latter
category would include freedom from torture, the
right to vote, the right to political
participation, right to a fair trial and others.
It is worth noting that many companies have
publicly committed to promote and respect all
international human rights as part of their UN
Global Compact commitments. This also includes
not being complicit in abuse by governments.
Many companies are now moving to put in place
company-wide policies to ensure internal
commitment to the same.
10
MESSAGE TWO
If approached with the same rigor as any other
business activity, it will not take long to
understand and scope the ways in which your
company has positive and negative impacts upon
human rights. Even where your company is not the
only actor in a given situation, this is an
important step. This can get rid of blind spots,
leading to effective mitigation, more nuanced
corporate communications, increased confidence
and successful commercial activities.
  • OPERATIONAL IMPACTSThe list below is an
    elementary list of the interface between business
    operations and human rights issues, using the Oil
    and Gas sector as an example. Many sectors not
    just the Oil and Gas sector have sector
    specific activities and resources such as The
    Human Rights Implementation in the Oil and Gas
    sector report by the International Petroleum
    Industry Environmental Conservation Association
    www.ipieca.org/activities/social/.../HRimplementat
    ion_final.pdf. A useful tool is the Human Rights
    Toolkit developed by the UN Environment Program
    Finance Initiative to alert lending managers in
    the top 200 banks of the world to risks in their
    lending portfolio www.unepfi.org/humanrightstoolk
    it.html - this maps human rights issues for 12
    industry sectors.
  • Exploration and project start-up can require the
    relocation of communities that may or may not be
    adequately managed by host governments (Right to
    property, right to livelihood, right to religious
    and cultural practices, right to information,
    right to peaceful assembly)
  • During the operational phase there are human
    rights impacts related to the workforce (right to
    healthy and safe work environment, freedom of
    association, right to adequate standard of
    living, non discrimination) and contractors
    (right to a living wage, forced labour, child
    labor)
  • During the operational phase there are also human
    rights impact related to the community (right to
    water, right to a clean environment, right to
    livelihood, right to health, non-discrimination)
  • The Oil and Gas industry has historically been
    entangled with human rights abuses by host
    governments either using company facilities (such
    as transport links) to support abuse against a
    section of the population, due to revenues being
    used to resource regimes committing human rights
    abuses or the use of public security forces that
    can provoke or intensify violence.

11
MESSAGE THREE
This is a business conversation with real
business concerns, risks and opportunities for
corporations to be mindful of. This should not be
treated as a soft topic or activity that is
nice to do like some corporate philanthropy . It
is about doing the right thing for the company as
much as for society.
  • Legal Liability Whilst international human right
    is often considered soft law there are
    increasing cases of companies being held to
    account in courts across the world. There are
    also some clear human rights Red Flags that can
    led to liability and prosecution in relation to
    international humanitarian law. See the work
    carried out by International Alert, released in
    2008 http//www.redflags.info/
  • Access to Capital The trends among the
    investment and finance community with regards
    human rights performance of corporations should
    be kept in mind. Led by the International Finance
    Corporation and certain export-credit agencies,
    Human Rights are becoming increasingly central to
    investor and lending considerations. The IFC will
    be revising its performance standards with
    specific regards to human rights, climate change
    and water in 2009/10. http//www.ifc.org/ifcext/su
    stainability.nsf/Content/EnvSocStandards
  • Social License to operate It is very rare for a
    company with any footprint in a specific location
    to be able to start and sustain operations if the
    local community or those with a stake in the
    territory/region do not look upon the company
    favorably. This is not to imply that all disfavor
    with industry is justified and helpful on human
    rights grounds. However, a demonstration of
    diligence and responsibility to the human rights
    of local populations should be a strong part of
    securing the social license to operate. The
    social license to operate is increasingly
    applying to consumer attitudes in India.
  • Operational disruption and loss of earnings
    Protests (especially managed badly), strikes,
    threats to security of staff can disrupt
    operations and often have an element of human
    rights issue behind them not suggesting that
    the company is the one at fault in all cases at
    all. This can be the same for all industries not
    simply for major extractives companies.
  • Reputation All Indian companies must consider
    their reputational equity as must any
    corporation in the globalized world. Two key
    trends are worth attention. First, the maturing
    and hardening of dialogue among states about
    corporate accountability for human rights abuse
    and second, the shifting of focus and increasing
    alliances between local and international NGOs
    looking at state-owned corporations especially
    from major emerging economies.
  • New Markets There is increasing move to design
    new business models, services and products to
    support the realization of rights
  • Shared language and new meaning Moving beyond
    interest based CSR and sustainability dialogue

12
MESSAGE FOUR
There are some Frequently Asked Questions that
all business executives and managers raise. Some
of these are listed here with initial answers in
this presentation (but these are worthy of more
discussion)
We follow national law wherever we operate. Is
this not enough? Compliance with national law is
part of a respect for human rights. However, many
companies operate where local law is weak, silent
or not strongly enforced, leaving corporations
operating in a kind of vacuum of worst, with
incentives to abuse or ignore human rights
issues. More importantly, the social license to
operate is often more important than the formal,
legal license provided by the state following
national law can simply be not enough. By
focusing on human rights as part of our business
strategy, are we increasing our exposure in any
way? With regard reputation, companies will
always be critiqued by someone, somewhere.
Increase transparency and engagement on human
rights issues will clearly encourage more of this
critique and feedback. However, this does not
mean increased exposure as approaching human
rights issues seriously gives chance to predict
concerns, mitigate risks and implement relevant
policies and practices. There is an ongoing
discussion concerning legal liability e.g. if a
company knows that an operation is likely to
impact human rights in an adverse way and still
proceeds without any mitigating factors, will it
be open to liability isnt ignorance bliss.
There is no precedent for this scenario today and
it is likely that specific circumstances will be
determinant. Will working on human rights
assessments, polices and procedures cost us
money? Yes, but it should be seen as an
investment and the returns can be predicted to
outweigh the costs. Taking a wider view, some
companies now have country/project risk processes
in place that include human rights and
environmental considerations. This can, on
occasion, lead to not pursuing a particular
project. In other words, companies with mature
and enlightened sensitivity to this issue may be
prepared to take a financial hit in order to
comply with their own policies and commitments.
Will respecting human rights reduce our
competitive advantage? All companies still needs
to compete in terms of price, quality and client
relationships. This should not be compromised at
any cost. The trend is for investors, governments
and cutomers to require higher not lower
standards from corporations.
13
MESSAGE FIVE
Part One The path forward is very clear and
should not be over complicated. There are
practical things that companies can do as part of
a forward-plan that fit into the emerging global
policy consensus about what corporate respect
human rights looks like. Part Two There are many
tools but all could benefit strongly from
testing, input and improvement by the Indian
business community.
  • PART ONE
  • The benefit of developing a coherent approach to
    human rights in 2009 is that there is increased
    clarity and simplicity about what is to expected
    of corporations. This is a result of the work
    done by the UN Special Representative to the
    Secretary General (UN SRSG) on Business and Human
    Rights (Professor John Ruggie). Whilst re-placing
    the state as the primary duty bearer with regards
    protection of human rights the SRSG - with the
    support of governments in the UN Human Rights
    Council including India and China has
    articulated that a Corporate Responsibility to
    Respect Human Rights does and should exist.
    Within this, the notion of Human Rights due
    diligence has been articulated as well as a
    specific note on operating on conflict zones it
    is worth taking the time to read the 2008 report
    of the SRSG Protect, Respect, Remedy A
    Framework for Business and Human Rights
    http//www.reports-and-materials.org/Ruggie-report
    -7-Apr-2008.pdf. The benefit of the idea of
    Human Rights due diligence is that it focuses
    on the policies, procedures and processes a
    corporation should have in place versus focus on
    elaborate interpretation of international human
    rights law to create some global standard. A
    global standard for companies ma emerge in the
    coming decades with some form of international
    court to arbitrate and enforce around such a
    standard. However, this process/procedural is
    arguably more helpful for business leaders. The
    components of Human Rights due diligence are
  • Polices Having a human rights policy or
    statement (often signposting to existing policies
    already in place)
  • Impact Assessments Undertaking impact
    assessments integrating or solely focused on
    human rights for units, investments, facilities,
    projects
  • Business Integration Taking steps to integrate
    human rights awareness and processes into core
    business activities and functions
  • Tracking Performance Reporting on human rights
    commitments, issues, dilemmas and performance
  • Remedy Ensuring that internal and external
    stakeholders have means of complaint to voice
    grievances

14
PART TWO
There are many tools but all could benefit
strongly from testing, input and improvement by
the Indian business community. The following
gives a sense of some of the resources available
to business to begin to understand the wider
agenda most of these have been developed with
strong input from business leaders.  
The Guide for Integrating Human Rights into
Business Management)  
Human Rights and Business A Primer for Indian
Business Leaders  
The Human Rights Matrix An interactive
self-assessment tool 
Human Rights Accountability Guide From law norms
to culture
Portal for UN SRSG on Business and Human Rights )
 
Business and Human Rights Resource Centre 
IFC / IBLF Guide to Human Rights Impact
Assessments 
Human Rights Translated 
15
PART THREE
POSSIBILITIES FOR ACTION
16
POSSIBLE VALUE OF A FOCUS ON HUMAN RIGHTS BY THE
UNGC MUMBAI CHAPTER
Z
GLOBAL
GLOBAL BUSINESSJoining voices to impact
stakeholder expectation, partners in achieving an
ethical globalization, Cross border and cultural
learning to influence business action
GLOBAL POLICYFirst strong collective voice in
global policy dialogue from beyond North America
and Western Europe, improved global policy
recommendations and dialogue
INDIAN INDUSTRYPioneers to follow on difficult
and feared issue, culture change in dealing
with human rights leading to more sustainable
business, mentors to SMES, Policy voice
NATIONALLYClarity on inclusive economic and
social development, policy insights and proposals
on major human rights issues, potential rights
based partnerships
UNGC NETWORK INDIAN BUSINESSESFellow Indian
companies with awareness and experience on human
rights, possible customization of IP to Indian
context, lead UNGC global community
IMMEDIATE STAKEHOLDERSDeeper understanding and
relationship with company,, alertness to a wide
set of needs NOT just the loudest interest
groups, reduced negative impacts, Improved and
heightened positive impacts Also, value-addition
to other UNGC Local Networks and their members in
Asia-Pacific and beyond
PARTICIPATING COMPANIESImproved ability to
mitigate risks, manage and improve reputation,
awareness to improve stakeholder relations,
demonstrating global good practice
BUSINESS COMMUNITY
STAKEHOLDERS
LOCAL
17
THREE ELEMENTS FOR 2009/10 SEPTEMBER 1ST 2009
TO SEPTEMBER 1ST 2010
LEG ONE
LEG TWO
LEG THREE
WORKING GROUP AWARENESS, LEARNING AND
CLARITY
DELIVERING FRAMEWORK AND RESOURCES TO WIDER
BUSINESS COMMUNITY
LEADERSHIP ON POLICY PROPOSALS AROUND KEY
BUSINESS AND HUMAN RIGHTS ISSUES
18
LEG ONE WORKING GROUP AWARENESS, LEARNING AND
CLARITY
  • OBJECTIIVES
  • To increase understanding of human rights in a
    business context
  • Deliver concrete (confidential) assessments to
    participating companies regarding their current
    policies, practices and initiatives in relation
    to internationally proclaimed human rights.
  • Identify key issues based on sector and also
    shared human rights challenges
  • (Also, familiarize with existing tools and
    frameworks)
  • DESCRIPTION
  • A handful (5 to 10) of UNGC Mumbai chapter
    companies work in parallel to do their internal
    work and self-assessment. This can be preceded by
    one group training event on Business and Human
    Rights, and followed by a report giving generic
    patterns and conclusions (not specific details on
    company findings) This could be supported by
    existing tools to support thinking on phase two.
  • IN PRACTICE
  • PHASE ONE TRAINING EVENT (INCLUDING VIRTUAL
    INTERFACE WITH INTERNATIONAL AND NATIONAL
    EXPERTS)
  • PHASE TWO USE OF HUMAN RIGHTS MATRIX AND
    INTERVIEWS ON UN MANDATE FRAMEWORK
  • PHASE THREE DEVELOPMENT OF INSIGHTS REPORT
  • DELIVERABLE(S)
  • Each company receives it own confidential
    assessment report

19
ELEMENT TWO DELIVERING FRAMEWORK AND RESOURCES TO
WIDER BUSINESS COMMUNITY
  • OBJECTIIVES
  • To deliver new or customized Business and Human
    Rights product or tool to Indian business
    community
  • DESCRIPTION
  • A small number (1 to 3) companies lead on doing a
    scan and review of major Business and Human
    Rights resources in the market. Following this
    scan and increases knowledge they should engage
    in a creative process to deliver what they feel
    is missing to the Indian business community. This
    can be customization of existing tools or an
    entirely new product.
  • IN PRACTICE
  • PHASE ONE TOOLS REVIEW (AND PHONE CALLS WITH
    TOOL DEVELOPERS IF NEEDED)
  • PHASE TWO CREATIVE PROCESS (PROBABLY LED BY ONE
    COMPANY)
  • PHASE THREE DELIVERY AND DISTRIBUTION OF OUTPUT
  • DELIVERABLE(S)
  • Feedback to current management tool developers on
    their tools
  • New or customized Business and Human Rights
    product or tool to Indian business community

20
ELEMENT THREE LEADERSHIP ON POLICY PROPOSALS
AROUND KEY BUSINESS AND HUMAN RIGHTS ISSUES
  • OBJECTIIVES
  • To impact government policy in relation to
    responsible business and specific human rights
    issues that interface with business
  • DESCRIPTION
  • Based strongly on experiences of work in legs one
    and two, and on engagements with other UNGC
    members across the country (from all sectors), a
    handful of urgent policy issues that relate to
    human rights in business will be identified.
    NOTE It will be important to do this in
    co-ordination with other policy dialogues taking
    place in the chambers and civil society. The
    group may consider looking at SC/ST based
    affirmative action in procurement, Acquisition
    and RR policies as they relate to human rights,
    requirements to ensure public and private company
    security forces used by business are trained in
    ethical and human rights norms, rights-based
    edits to BIS, PMO or Minister of Corporate
    Affairs codes, Improvement to access to judicial
    and non-judicial dispute resolutions, Voluntary
    code for Indian corporations with markets and
    operations outside of India. Not also that Team
    Ruggie are doing a review of corporate law in
    India (and 39 other countries) to see the degree
    to which it drives or undermines respect for
    human rights by business. There are 15 law firms
    doing this work pro-bono (three based in India)
  • IN PRACTICE
  • PHASE ONE RESEARCH AND GROUP WIDE BRAINSTORM ON
    POTENTIAL ISSUES (INCLUDING WHAT IS ALREADY BEING
    DONE)
  • PHASE TWO SMALLER POLICY TASK FORCE TO MOVE
    FORWARD ON AGREED ISSUES
  • PHASE THREE DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF
    GOVERNMENT ENGAGEMENT/INFLUENCE PROCESS
  • PHAST FOUR IMPLEMENTATION OF CHANGE !!!
  • DELIVERABLE(S)
  • Research paper on relevant policy areas and
    progress
  • Policy proposal (and UNGC member consensus around
    this)

21
WORKING PRINCIPLESINITIAL IDEAS FOR DISCUSSION
  • MEMBERS OF WORKING GROUP HAVE SENIOR
    COMMITMENT TO PARTICIPATE
  • NO NEED FOR ALL MEMBERS TO BE ACTIVE IN ALL THREE
    LEGS
  • INTERFACE WITH WIDER UNGC INDIA NETWORK MEMBERS
    AND GOVERNANCE?
  • CLEAR PROJECT PLAN AND TIME-LINE TO BE AGREED ON
    A 6-MONTH CYCLE
  • .

22
OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENGAGEMENT
  • TEN INITIAL IDEAS
  • Aside from any shared work, representatives from
    the Mumbai chapter may want to engage in some of
    the following activities in 2009/10
  • Business and Human Rights Roundtable, New Delhi.
    November 5th and 6th
  • Dialogue with International Business and Human
    Rights experts (including team Ruggie)
  • Interaction with ABB, Coca-Cola, GE, HP, Total
    and Shell e.g. business to business mentoring
    potential membership of Global Business
    Initiative on Human Rights
  • Interaction with Dutch UN Global Compact Network
    program leader and companies on Business and
    Human Rights
  • Participation in October Ruggie consultation
    organized by Office of the UN High Commissioner
    on Human Rights (Geneva)
  • Ongoing work of Institute for Human Rights and
    Business on land and right to water
  • UN Global Compact leaders summit in June 2010
  • Engaging with IFC Performance Standard review
    process
  • Possible 2010 work with India focus on caste,
    security and conflict, land (various
    organizations)
  • UNGC Asia-Pacific networks meeting in February
    2010
  • .

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PART FOUR
DRAFT AGENDA FOR SESSION ON AUGUST 21ST
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  • OBJECTIVES
  • To share early questions and reactions to
    considering human rights in a business context in
    India
  • To bounce around ideas for what the group can
    do together based on initial ideas in this
    presentation
  • To identify companies wanting to participate in
    the next 12-months and a few lead anchor
    companies
  • To agree a time for a conference call to
    co-develop detailed proposal, work plan, resource
    plan etc.
  • .

FLOW5 MINUTES Presentation on Business and
Human Rights (using part one and two of
presentation) 5 MINUTES Discussion on Business
and Human Rights 5 MINUTES Presentation of
Possibilities for Action (using part three of
presentation) Followed by wider group discussion
on possibilities and agreeing next steps .
25
Mark.hodge_at_global-business-initiaitve.org www.glob
al-business-initiative.org 91 9871187700
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