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Real Books that Change Your Life!

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According to Peralt-Nash & Dutch (2000), literature circles provide a low-risk ... group discussion in meaningful and functional ways (Peralta-Nash & Dutch 2000) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Real Books that Change Your Life!


1
Real Books that Change Your Life!
  • Real books are wonderful. . . Real books rest
    beside your bed, clutter the coffee table, and
    stand on shelves at the ready - waiting to be
    lifted, opened, and brought to life by your
    reading. Real booksare written by authors who
    know how to unlock the world with words and to
    open our eyes and our hearts. Each real book has
    its own voice - a singular clear voice-and each
    speaks words that move us towards increased
    consciousness.
  • Peterson Eeds , Grand Conversations. 2007

2
Why Literature Circles?
  • Studies have shown that when students are
    involved in authentic conversation about
    literature, they are more engaged in their
    reading (Alpert, 1987 Enciso, 1996) and they
    take more risks (Eeds Wells, 1989).
  • Literature circles also promote students
    motivation to read and have been shown to improve
    students reading levels and performance on tests
    (Davis, Resta, Davis, Camacho, 2001).
  • Student-Centered Reading A Review of Research
    on Literature Circles EPS Tanya Auger 2003

3
  • Thinking Together Arthur L. Costa
  • Learning is a reciprocal process the individual
    influences the groups thinking, and the group
    influences the individuals thinking.
  • Instructional techniques that encourage group
    activities help students construct both their own
    and shared knowledge.

4
As we construct meaning using Thinking Maps in
our Literature Circles we meet the National
Standards for Language Arts.
  • Students read a wide range of print and nonprint
    texts
  • to build an understanding of texts, of
    themselves, and of the cultures of the United
    States and the world
  • to acquire new information
  • to respond to the needs and demands of society
    and the workplace and for personal fulfillment.
  • Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction,
    classic and contemporary works.

5
As we construct meaning using Thinking Maps in
our Literature Circles we meet the National
Standards for Language Arts.
  • Students apply a wide range of strategies to
    comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate
    texts.
  • They draw on their prior experience, their
    interactions with other readers and writers,
    their knowledge of word meaning and of other
    texts, their word identification strategies, and
    their understanding of textual features.

6
As we construct meaning using Thinking Maps in
our Literature Circles we meet the National
Standards for Language Arts.
  • Students develop an understanding of and respect
    for diversity in language use, patterns, and
    dialects across cultures, ethnic groups,
    geographic regions, and social roles.
  • Students participate as knowledgeable,
    reflective, creative, and critical members of a
    variety of literacy communities.

7
English Language Learners
  • According to Peralt-Nash Dutch (2000),
    literature circles provide a low-risk environment
    for children who are learning English as a second
    language.
  • Some authors believe that these students are able
    to make use of the linguistic resources and
    knowledge they posses in order to make sense of
    the text, to relate it to their life experience,
    and to participate in the group discussion in
    meaningful and functional ways (Peralta-Nash
    Dutch 2000).
  • ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading, English, and
    Communication Digest 173 Chia-Hui Lin (2002)

8
Harvey Daniels, Literature Circles Voice and
Choice in the Student-Centered Classroom. 2002
9
Harvey Daniels, Literature Circles Voice and
Choice in the Student-Centered Classroom. 2002
10
Connector
  • Finds text-to-self connections connects to
    events and/or experiences in your own life.
  • Finds text-to-text connections similar events in
    other books and stories, other text on the same
    topic, or other text by the same author.
  • Finds text-to-world connections similar
    happenings taking place in the school, community,
    or world, similar events in other times or
    places.

11
Literary Luminary
  • Choose passages that beg to be read aloud to the
    group.
  •  Look for passages that are powerful, memorable,
    surprising, or puzzling.
  • Justify your reasons for selecting the
    passage/passages

12
Set Designer
  • Identify the setting and the specific parts of
    the setting.
  • Add a Frame of Reference and draw some
    conclusions about why the author chose this
    setting.
  • Identify parts of the setting that are not
    specifically described, but that are inferred.
  • Illustrate and/or cut out magazine pictures to
    capture the setting described in the text.

13
"The land was barren and desolate. He could see a
few rundown buildings and some tents. Farther
away there was a cabin beneath two tall trees.
Those two trees were the only plant life he could
see. There weren't even weeds."
Nearly everything in the room was broken the
TV, the pinball machine, the furniture.
There were seven cots, each one less then two
feet from the one next to it. Seven crates were
stacked in two piles at one side of the tent.
14
The barnwas pleasantly cool in summer when the
big doors stood wide open to the breeze. The
barn had stalls on the main floor for the work
horses, tie-ups on the main floor for the cows, a
sheepfold down below for the sheep, a pigpen down
below for Wilbur, and it was full of all sorts of
things that you find in barns
15
Character Captain
  • Identify the major characters in the piece.
  • Describe revealing personality traits.
  • Justify those traits with examples of the
    behaviors and/or actions of the
    character/characters
  • Show character change over time.
  • Compare and contrast the protagonist and
    antagonist.

16
  • Upset
  • Happy
  • Angry
  • Sad
  • Nervous
  • Scared

happy
17
Summary Expert
  • Summarize the passage, chapter, or book.
  • Do not retell the entire sequence of events, just
    focus on the important parts.
  • Summarize in pictures, phrases or sentences.
  • Describe the mood or tone of each event .
  • Create a plot line including the climax and
    resolution.

?
18
Summary Expert
  • Summarize the passage, chapter, or book.
  • Do not retell the entire sequence of events, just
    focus on the important parts.
  • Summarize in pictures, phrases or sentences.
  • Describe the mood or tone of each event .
  • Create a plot line including the climax and
    resolution.

?
19
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20
Vocabulary Visionary
  • Look for memorable language strong verbs,
    figurative language, interesting words/phrases,
    and vivid descriptions
  • These examples should be puzzling, funny, vivid,
    unfamiliar, used in an unusual way, repetitive
    and/or important to the story.

21
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22
Composer
  • Identify the genres of music that would make up
    the soundtrack of this story.
  • Choose one scene in the novel that MUST have
    music, choose a specific song and justify the
    reasons for your choice.
  • Choose a song for each of the major characters in
    the text and describe the mood that the song
    creates.

23
strong
Charlotte Respect
proud
joyous
confident
24
Illustrator
  • Draw a picture related to the text you have just
    read.
  • Draw a picture of something that you were
    reminded of in the story.
  • Draw a picture that illustrates a mood or feeling
    you got from the passage.
  • Label the parts of your picture.
  • Frame your illustration with one of the following
    questions What does the picture mean to you?
    Where did the idea for this picture come from?
    or What does this picture represent to you?

25
Discussion Director
  • As a group frame your thinking with Ahas, Big
    Ideas, Fat Questions, or Wonderings

How did this story change your thinking about?
26
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27
Taking it off the maps
  • Posters advertising the book
  • TV movie critic-style reviews
  • Panel debates
  • Diary of a character
  • Interview with the author (real or fictionalized)
  • A new ending for the book
  • Performances of a lost scene from the book
  • Family tree of a key character
  • ABC Book
  • Harvey Daniels, Literature Circles Voice and
    Choice in the Student-Centered Classroom. 2002

28
Adaptations for the primary grades (K-2)
  • Books appropriate for emergent readers (wordless
    books, picture books, big books etc.)
  • Books are often read aloud to the children
  • Children typically read entire book prior to
    discussion
  • Record responses in drawing or writing at their
    own level.
  • Two phases sharing discussion
  • Teacher present in meeting
  • Bookmarks used to hold special places in the
    story.
  • Harvey Daniels, Literature Circles Voice and
    Choice in the Student-Centered Classroom. 2002

29
(No Transcript)
30
Resources
  • Campbell Hill, B., Schlick Noe, K. , Johnson, N.
    (2001). Literature Circles Resource Guide
    Teaching Suggestions, Forms, Sample Book Lists
    and Database. Norwood, Massachusetts
    Christopher-Gordon Publishers, Inc.
  • Daniels, H. (2002). Literature Circles Voice
    and Choice in Book Clubs Reading Groups.
    Portland, Maine Stenhouse Publishers.

31
Resources
  • Hyerle, D., Yeager, C. (2007). A Language for
    Learning. Cary, North Carolina Thinking Maps,
    Inc.
  • Peterson, R., Eeds, M. (2007). Grand
    Conversations Literature Groups in Action. New
    York Scholastic, Inc.
  • Rogers, W., Leochko, D. (2002). Literature
    Circles Tools and Techniques to Inspire Reading
    Groups. Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Portage
    Main Press.

32
Learning to think begins with recognizing how we
are thinking by listening to ourselves and own
reactions and realizing how our thoughts may
encapsulate us. Arthur L. Costa
33
Thinking Maps, Inc. California Consultants Sarah
McNeil smcneil_at_thinkingmaps.com Leanna
Brown leanna_at_thinkingmaps.com
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