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Setting Up a National Learning and Teaching Centre in Higher Education: Lessons Learned from the Aus

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Director: Disciplines, Networks and Special Projects ... Longing for past glories. Efforts focus on inventing better mouse traps (Ewell, 1991) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Setting Up a National Learning and Teaching Centre in Higher Education: Lessons Learned from the Aus


1
Setting Up a National Learning and Teaching
Centre in Higher EducationLessons Learned from
the Australian Experience
  • Janice OrrellCarrick Institute for Learning and
    Teaching in Higher EducationDirector
    Disciplines, Networks and Special Projects

2
Carrick Institute for Learning and Teaching in
Higher Education
  • An Initiative of DEST
  • Established and funded as a Public Company
  • 2005 planning year
  • 2006-2008 first triennium

3
Institute Values
  • Inclusiveness through networks and communities of
    all who contribute to the advancement of earning
    and teaching
  • Diversity of institutional and discipline
    differences
  • Long-term, future oriented, systemic change
  • Collaboration through engagement
  • Recognition and reward of Excellence

4
Institute Objectives
  • Promotion of systemic change
  • Recognise fundamental importance of HE learning
    teaching
  • Develop mechanisms to identify, develop and
    disseminate good practice
  • Establish reciprocal national and international
    sharing and benchmarking
  • Identify important future oriented issues that
    impact on higher education and facilitate
    national approaches to them

5

Five Schemes
  • Grants
  • Awards
  • Fellowships
  • Discipline-based Initiatives
  • Resource Identification Network

6
Grants Scheme Carrick Director Dr Elizabeth
McDonald
  • 28 Million between 2006-2008
  • Priority Projects
  • Academic standards, assessment practices
  • Teaching and learning spaces
  • Peer review
  • Competitive Grants
  • Research development of issues continuing
    importance
  • Strategic approaches to LT diversity of
    student body
  • Innovation in learning and teaching
  • Leadership in Learning Teaching (enhancement of
    learning teaching through)
  • Institutional leadership capacity building
  • Disciplinary and cross-disciplinary communities
    of practice

7
Recognising Rewarding Good Teaching Carrick
Director Denise Chalmers
  • Awards
  • Citations for outstanding contributions to
    student learning (210)
  • Teaching excellence (including PMs award) (27)
  • Programmes that enhance learning (14)
  • Fellowships
  • Indicators Project
  • Recognition and reward of Good Teaching

8
What is New?
  • AWARDS
  • Recognising a wider range of contribution to
    student learning
  • Involvement of institutions in the assessment
    process
  • Regional Citation Award ceremonies
  • Recognition of contributions of many people. eg
    teaching, administration and professional.
  • FELLOWSHIPS SCHEME
  • Senior Fellowship Program (4)max 330,000
  • Associate Fellowship Program (10)max 90,000

9
Fellowships
  • New initiative based on the best aspects of
    international fellowship programs
  • High profile and well resourced
  • Designed to promote system wide initiatives
  • Strong encouragement for international links and
    networks
  • Strong commitment to dissemination and
    implementation

10
Discipline Based InitiativesDirector Janice
Orrell
  • Disciplines influence
  • Ways in which academic work is organised
  • Relationship of academics to knowledge their
    students
  • Type of intended learning outcomes
  • Research about teaching and learning in
    universities (Neumann 2001, Becher and Trowler
    2001, Neuman, Parry, Becher 2002)

11
Higher Education Disciplines
  • Site of knowledge development
  • Demonstrate interdependence of organisational
    context and what counts as knowledge
  • Higher Education reflects and reconstitutes
  • Classifications of knowledge,
  • What is expertise
  • Knowledge worth knowing

12
Strengths of D-b Development
  • Engages those who must collaborate at the level
    of practice
  • Builds on agreed strengths
  • Attends to common problems
  • Facilitates common purpose and collaborative
    action
  • Enables the development of curriculum cohesions

13
Limitations of D-b Development
  • Much is based on common practice, not evidence
  • Common practice reinforces common practices and
    can constrain originality
  • It is difficult to define a discipline and
    classify its orientation
  • Risk of disciplinary silos
  • Limits cross-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary
    thinking

14
Professional learning of teachers (Knight, Tait
and Yorke, 2006)
  • Effective learning about TL is maintained IF
  • Colleagues will tolerate it
  • Department rules can accommodate it
  • Tools and heuristics are there to translate
    generic ideas into practice
  • They have positions of influence

15
Inertia of Academic structures
  • Academic disciplinary structures have failed to
    respond well to changes in
  • Student demographics
  • Labour market requirements
  • Technological advances

16
Conservatism and Inertia protect cherished ideals
Gumport Snydman, 2002
  • Longing for past glories
  • Efforts focus on inventing better mouse traps
  • (Ewell, 1991)

17
Issues Needs
  • Knowledge legitimation
  • Encourages scholarship of learning and teaching
    in the disciplines
  • Requires funds to conduct the research
  • Requires knowledge of educational research
    methods
  • Effective dissemination systems

18
Objectives of Carricks D-B I
  • Higher levels of d-b engagement with systemic
    change
  • Increased engagement of all stakeholders
  • Improved discipline-based learning outcomes
  • Articulation of d-b standards and qualities

19
Discipline Framework
20
D-B I Principles
  • Capturing the dynamic potential of D-b I
  • Creative interdisciplinary engagement
  • Focus on the student experience
  • Collaboration with stakeholders
  • Building on past successes and resources
  • Engage with international and global issues
  • Develop what is uniquely Australian
  • Attend to the research-teaching nexus
  • Sustainable, future oriented and proactive

21
Organisation
  • Led by Discipline leaders
  • Hosted by institutions
  • Involve multiple institutions and organisations
  • Utilise existing structures where they exist
  • Vigorously involve middle management
  • Adopt a common web-based architecture (RIN)

22
Dissemination
  • Transformation
  • Interpretation
  • Translation
  • Application
  • Regeneration
  • Transmission
  • Awareness
  • Knowledge

23
Carrick Exchange ( a Resource Identification
Network)
  • A centrally co-ordinated service which
  • Is credible and reliable
  • Facilitates sharing and adoption of good practice
  • Supports dissemination
  • Encourages and enables an ethos of bold
    innovation
  • Links existing Australian resources from
    different sites
  • Links with, and capitalises on, international
    initiatives
  • Fosters international collaborations

24
Implementation plan
  • Three year project
  • Three project teams
  • Education.au architecture functionality
  • Ascilite landscape mapping and user engagement
  • formative evaluation (out to tender)
  • Informed by a Think Tank of experts and users

25
Carrick Institute Philosophy Approach
  • Enabling
  • Collaboration
  • Co-production Bottom-up and Top-down
  • Multiple modes of engagement (grants, forums,
    scholarship)
  • Future orientation
  • Building on existing resources and strengths
  • Stakeholder engagement

26
Successes
  • Citations
  • Institutions adopting a systemised approach to
    Carrick Programmes
  • Engagement between the institute and institutions
    and organisations (Forums, campus visits, think
    tanks)
  • Utilisation of sector experts who have retired
  • DVC/PVC Forum to set priorities and top down
    agendas
  • Higher Education Enterprise Initiatives Common
    Curriculum Concerns

27
Lessons Learned
  • The value of bringing groups with common concerns
    together
  • Need to integrate a top-down approach to address
    gaps and to steer attention to the too hard
    issues
  • Money helps, but is not the only answer
  • Need for support to be successful (leadership
    programme, expert consultants, seed funds)
  • Importance of adopting a systems approach (all
    levels and stakeholders, policy and practice)
  • Importance of engaging formal informal
    leadership

28
  • Questions?
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