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Let Emotional

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Title: Let Emotional


1
VLGWA Sept 10, 2003
Let Emotional Intelligence Skills Help You
In Your Profession
Professor Deborah Roberts University of
Virginia Weldon Cooper Center for Public
Service (804)982-5517 e-mailddr7a_at_virginia.edu
2
My Mission High Performance Government Deliverin
g on Democracy
Transforming government organizations through
Effective Leadership and by Practicing
Democracys values and principles in public
administration every day
3
Todays Agenda
1. Emotional Intelligence Key to Your
Professional Success 2. What is it? How Does
It Work? 3. EQ Specifics Four Skill Domains
4. Good News How to Improve Your Own
Emotional Intelligence. v What it takes v How
to get started
4
Nature of Work - Collaboration
  • What percent of the knowledge needed to do your
    own job do you have by yourself?
  • 1979? ____ percent
  • 2000? ____percent

5
What is Emotional Intelligence?
The capacity for recognizing our own feelings
and those of others, for motivating ourselves and
for managing emotions in ourselves and
others. Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
(New York Bantam Books, 1995)
6
Emotional Intelligence
The best of what makes us uniquely human
7
Practical Relevance?
  • These performance competencies together explain
    from 65 to 90 of Star Performer success in
    your professional field
  • EQ (also called EI) is a logical frame to
    understand the puzzle of life success

8
What is Emotional Intelligence?
  • Shown in Four Ways
  • Understanding Yourself
  • Governing Yourself
  • Understanding Others
  • Managing Your Relationships with Others

9
What is Emotional Intelligence?
  • Developed via specific Emotional Competencies
    (like adaptability, self control, influence,
    conflict management,communication) that lead to
    effective performance at work, outstanding
    leadership, and deeply satisfying relationships
    in life.

10
Key Person in Your Career
  • Center your thoughts on a key person who made an
    impact on your interest in public service and
    government (ex. a mentor or a leader).
  • Reflect on what were the capabilities and the
    qualities of the person that most impressed you.
    Please write down key words to share with the
    full group.
  • KEY WORDS

11
The Competency Framework
Self- Awareness
Social Awareness
  • Empathy
  • Leveraging Diversity
  • Organizational Awareness
  • Stewardship
  • Emotional Self-Awareness
  • Accurate Self-Assessment
  • Self-Confidence

Social Skills
Self- Management
  • Developing Others
  • Leadership
  • Influence
  • Communication
  • Change Catalyst
  • Conflict Management
  • Networking, Building Bonds
  • Teamwork Collaboration
  • Self-Control
  • Trustworthiness
  • Conscientiousness
  • Adaptability
  • Achievement Orientation
  • Initiative optimism

12
Four Foundation Skills
Self- Awareness
Social Awareness
  • Emotional Self-Awareness
  • Empathy

Social Skills
Self- Management
  • Influence
  • Self-Control

13
The Conceptual Model
How Emotional Intelligence Drives Performance
Self
Others
Self- Awareness
Social Awareness
Awareness
Social Skills
Self- Management
Actions
14
What is a Competency?
Any measurable characteristic of a person that
differentiates level of performance in a given
job, role, organization or culture.
Necessary for top performance but not sufficient
Skill Knowledge
Social Role, Values Self-Image Trait Motive
Characteristics that lead to longer-term success
15
The Case for EQ Why Do Smart People Fail?
  • Intellectual Capabilities
  • Intellectual capability (IQ), knowledge, and
    technical expertise are threshold they get you
    in the door.

16
Why Do Smart People Fail?
  • Emotional Intelligence
  • Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is the
    differentiating factor in success.
  • EQ is two times as important as IQ and technical
    expertise combined.

17
The Case for EQ What Leads to Success?
181 different positions from 121 organizations
worldwide…67 of the abilities deemed essential
for effective performance were emotional
competencies. (cf. Rosier, 1994)
18
Importance of EQ Skills

Every job description should include the
emotional intelligence competencies critical to
getting the work done. Claudio Fernandez-Araoz,
Hiring Without Firing Harvard Business Review
July/August 1999
19
Different Brain Skill Centers
  • IQ tracks cognitive abilities and is centered in
    the neocortex.
  • Emotional Intelligence (EI or EQ) is centered in
    the more ancient brain memory center, the Limbic
    system.

20
Different Brain Skill Centers
  • Emotional Intelligence skills are distinct from,
    but synergistic with cognitive abilities. You
    need both IQ and EQ to succeed.
  • To achieve Emotional Intelligence, we need to use
    our whole brain, in an integrated, thoughtful
    response.

21
The Human Brain
Neocortex The part of the brain most recent in
evolution is associated with complex thought.
Prefrontal Lobes The brains executive center
integrates information from all parts of the
brain and makes decisions to act.
Thalamus Processes sensory messages (e.g., eyes
and ears) then routes them mainly to the
neocortex.
Amygdala Triggers emotional responses. Typically
gets signals from the neocortex, but a quicker
and fuzzier signal comes directly from the
thalamus. Can hijack the brain when it perceives
an emergency.
Brain Stem The most primitive part of the brain.
Is associated predominantly with automatic
reflexes, as well as memory and learning.
22
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23
When to Trust Your Gut, Alden Hayashi, Harvard
Business Review, February 2001
  • Often called gut feelings, business instincts,
    savvy, professional judgment, or intuition, it
    is an uncanny ability to detect patterns, perhaps
    subconsciously, that other people either overlook
    or mistake for random noise. Executives use it
    to solve complex problems when logical methods
    simply wont do.

24
When to Trust Your Gut, Alden Hayashi, Harvard
Business Review, February 2001
  • Our emotions and feelings play a critical role
    by helping us filter various possibilities
    quickly,
  • even though our conscious mind might not be
    aware of the screening ….guid(ing) our decision
    making to the point at which our conscious mind
    is able to make good choices..

25
When to Trust Your Gut, Alden Hayashi, Harvard
Business Review, February 2001
  • But our first, quick, gut instincts are often
    wrong.
  • So we need to have powerful self-checking
    mechanisms, self reflection, and sound feedback
    -- the EQ competencies.

26
II. Self-Management
Self- Management
Self-Governing
  • 4th Competency Self-Control keeping disruptive
    emotions and impulses under control
  • 5th Competency Trustworthiness maintaining
    standards of honesty and integrity
  • 6th Competency Conscientiousness demonstrating
    responsibility in managing oneself
  • 7th Competency Adaptability flexibility in
    adapting to changing situations or obstacles

27
An Amygdala Hijacking
  • 1. In duos discuss a recent episode in which you
    experienced an amygdala hijacking -- you were not
    acting like your normal self.
  • 2. What set it off? Triggers or catalysts?
  • 3. What behavior would have been more effective?
  • TRIGGERS CONSEQUENCES BETTER STRATEGY

28
Emotional Hijackings Consequences
  • Out-of-control emotions deprive us of our
    cognitive abilities. During a hijacking, when
    we are suddenly flooded with sensations, even
    smart people become dumb.
  • Consequences are negative and lasting, often
    keeping us from realizing our deepest values in
    positive action (these values are often our
    emotional triggers).
  • Ripple Effects. Interpersonal ineptitude in
    leaders lowers everyones performance.

29
How Old are You in the Tough Moment? Emotional
Triggers Take You Back to Childhood Experience
30
Better Strategy? All the Competencies Will Help
You
Self- Awareness
Social Awareness
  • Empathy
  • Leveraging Diversity
  • Organizational Awareness
  • Stewardship
  • Emotional Self-Awareness
  • Accurate Self-Assessment
  • Self-Confidence

Social Skills
Self- Management
  • Developing Others
  • Leadership
  • Influence
  • Communication
  • Change Catalyst
  • Conflict Management
  • Networking, Building Bonds
  • Teamwork Collaboration
  • Self-Control
  • Trustworthiness
  • Conscientiousness
  • Adaptability
  • Achievement Orientation
  • Initiative optimism

31
The Marshmallow Kids Impulse Resisters
  • Stanford University study. Tracked four-year-old
    children through high school. Results for the
    Resisters
  • More socially competent, personally effective,
    self-assertive and better able to cope with life
    frustrations
  • Less likely to freeze, regress or become
    disorganized when under pressure
  • Embraced and pursued challenges in the face of
    difficulties……….

32
The Marshmallow Kids Impulse Resisters
  • Self reliant and confident, trustworthy,
    dependable, initiative
  • Still able to delay gratification in pursuit of
    their goals
  • More academically competent, better able to put
    their ideas into words, to use and respond to
    reason, to concentrate, and to make plans and
    follow through. Eager to learn.
  • Dramatically higher SAT scores (210 points on
    1600 scale)

33
II. Self-Management
Self- Management
Motivation
  • 8th Competency Achievement Orientation the
    guiding drive to meet an internal standard of
    excellence
  • 9th Competency Initiative and Optimism
    readiness to act

34
Self Managing Exercise
If I took responsibility for every every feeling
I experience and for every word I utter,
________ ______________________________ Fill in
Your answer. (ex. Id make fewer snap
judgments that end up being wrong.
35
III. Social Awareness
Social Awareness
  • 10th Competency -- Empathy understanding others
    and taking an active interest in their concerns
  • 11th Competency -- Leveraging Diversity
    Cultivating opportunities through many kinds of
    people
  • 12th Competency -- Organizational Awareness
    Savvy, understanding and empathizing (issues,
    dynamics and politics) at the organizational
    level
  • 13th Competency -- Stewardship Orientation
    recognizing and meeting citizens and customer
    needs

Not included in the 360 degree feedback
Emotional Competencies Inventory
36
Emotional Awareness of Others
I think about how others might feel before I
give my opinion. I can sense someones
feelings even when it is unspoken. I can get
new people I meet to talk about themselves. I
am good at reading between the lines when
someone is talking.
37
PARADIGM Maps through which we see the
world Assumptions that are usually not
questioned A mental frame of reference -- a
representation.
38
PARADIGM Our behavior flows from our paradigms,
or the assumptions we make about the world.
39
When Lack Empathy Sense of Alien
40
IV. Social Skills
Social Capability
Leading Others
  • 14th Competency --Developing Others sensing
    others development needs and bolstering their
    abilities
  • 15th Competency -- Leadership inspiring and
    guiding groups and people
  • 16th Competency -- Influence wielding
    interpersonal influence tactics
  • 17th Competency -- Communication sending clear
    and convincing messages
  • 18th Competency --Change Catalyst initiating or
    managing change

41
IV. Social Skills
Social Capability
  • 19th Competency -- Conflict Management resolving
    disagreements
  • 20th Competency -- Networking Building Bonds
    cultivating and nurturing a web of relationships,
    seeking partnerships
  • 21st Competency -- Teamwork and Collaboration
    working with others toward shared goals

Working With Others
42
I. Self-Awareness
Self- Awareness
The Core of Emotional Intelligence
  • First Competency Emotional Self-Awareness
    recognizing our emotions and their effects. The
    goal is for the individual to truly have a
    guiding awareness of his or her values and goals
    that directs action.

43
In-the-Moment Self Awareness Exercise
Right now My Level of
ENERGY _____________ OPENNESS _____________ FO
CUS _____________ Rate yourself on a scale
of 1 (lowest) to 10 (highest) (Source
Robert Cooper)
44
I. Self-Awareness
Self- Awareness
The Core of Emotional Intelligence
  • 2nd Competency Accurate Self-Assessment
    knowing our strengths and limits
  • 3rd Competency Self-Confidence a strong sense
    of our self-worth and capabilities

45
High above the hushed crowd, Rex tried to
remain focused. Still, he couldnt shake
one nagging thought He was an old dog and this
was a new trick. Far Side
46
Contending with Emotional Baggage -- Ours and
Others
47
Developing Emotional Intelligence
To Develop Emotional Intelligence, We Must Engage
Our Heads and Our Hearts.
  • We have to truly want to change. It can be done,
    but it is not easy and takes time.
  • The changes we seek must be linked to our dreams
    for the future, our deepest interests in life,
    our values, and our beliefs. As Victor Frankel
    says, Mans Search for Meaning.
  • We need to see a vision of our future self and
    know how that vision is different from our
    current state.

Determination
Passion
Vision
48
EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT
AGENDA
  • PLUSES
  • My EQ Skill Strengths
  • (Ex.. Consistent competencies you show at work
    and in life, what others rely upon you for.)
  • DELTAS ???
  • MY EQ Skills that I need to Improve and Develop
  • (Ex Where you rate yourself low. Blind
    Spots on which others have given you feedback.)
  • Top priorities that you want to commit to
    developing and would make the most difference in
    your work personal life.

49
EQ Competency Action Plan
  • Select a specific EQ competency as your
    development priority ______________________
  • Self Awareness Self insight as to why and what
    in your life experiences has shaped your approach
    to this performance competency?
  • Learning Stretch Devise a specific action that
    would 1) give you the experiential learning to
    improve on this skill, 2) the results would be of
    value to others, as well as yourself, and 3) it
    is a reasonable risk,safe strategy, with likely
    successful outcomes.
  • Asset Bridging Brainstorm on ways to use your
    specific strengths as a bridge to achieving
    mastery of your development priority.

50
EQ Competency Action Plan
  • EQ competency development priority_______________
    ________
  • Self Awareness Self insight as to why and what
    in your life experiences has shaped your approach
    to this performance competency? Key events,
    key people? For you, what emotions and values
    are tied to this competency?
  • Within this competency, what is it that you can
    do well, what specifically do you need to target
    for improvement?

51
  • Asset Bridging Brainstorm on ways to use your
    specific strengths as a bridge to achieving
    mastery of your development priority (consider
    competencies from all 4 EQ domains self
    awareness, self management, social awareness, and
    social skills)
  • Learning Stretch Devise a specific action that
    would 1) give you the experience to learn and
    improve on this skill, 2) the results would be of
    value to others, as well as yourself, and 3) it
    is a reasonable risk,safe strategy, with likely
    successful outcomes.

52
Selected Bibliography
  • Robert K. Cooper and Ayman Sawaf, Executive EQ
    Emotional Intelligence in Leadership and
    Organizations, a Perigee Book, The Berkley
    Publishing Group, New York, 1997.
  • Robert K. Cooper, The Other 90 How to Unlock
    Your Vast Untapped Potential for Leadership and
    Life, Three Rivers press, New York, 2001.

53
Selected Bibliography
  • Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence (New York
    Bantam Books, 1995)
  • Daniel Goleman, Working with Emotional
    Intelligence (New York, Bantam Books, 1998
  • Daniel Goleman, Leadership That Gets Results,
    Harvard Business Review, March-April 2000, pp.
    78-90.

54
Selected Bibliography
  • Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis, and Annie
    McKee, Primal Leadership Realizing the Power of
    Emotional Intelligence (Boston, MA Harvard
    Business School Press, 2002).
  • Alden Hayashi, When To Trust Your Gut,
    Harvard Business Review, February 2001.
  • Vanessa Urch Druskat Steven B. Wolff, Building
    the Emotional Intelligence of Groups, Harvard
    Business Review, March 2001, pp. 81-90.
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