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Creating Quality Curriculum for Gifted Learners

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(Joyce Van-Tassel Baska) Parallel Curriculum Model (Carol Tomlinson et al. ... for High Ability Learners, by Joyce Van-Tassel Baska (with Catherine A. Little) 2002 ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Creating Quality Curriculum for Gifted Learners


1
Creating QualityCurriculumfor Gifted Learners
  • Cindy Sheets
  • ALPS 2008
  • cindys2449_at_aol.com816-525-7046
  • 816-916-6001 (cell)

2
Curriculum?
  • What is curriculum?
  • What are the components of quality curriculum?
  • What makes curriculum a good fit for gifted
    learners
  • What makes curriculum good for life-long
    learners?
  • (Is it possible to learn and have fun at the same
    time?)

3
What KIND of Curriculum is Best?
  • Content Based Curriculum (Joyce Van-Tassel
    Baska)
  • Parallel Curriculum Model (Carol Tomlinson et
    al.)
  • Concept-Based Curriculum (H. Lynn Erickson)
  • Problem-Based Curriculum
  • Multiple Menu Model (Renzulli et al.)

4
Some Underlying Assumptions About Curriculum .
  • guide students in mastery
  • key information, ideas, and the fundamental
    skills of the discipline.
  • help students grapple with complex and ambiguous
    issues and problems.
  • move students from a novice to an expert level of
    in the disciplines.
  • provide students opportunities for original work
    in the disciplines.
  • help students encounter, accept, and ultimately
    embrace challenge in learning

5
  • prepare students for a world in which knowledge
    expands and changes at a dizzying pace.
  • help students determine constants in the past and
    in themselves while helping them prepare for a
    changing world.
  • help students develop a sense of themselves as
    well as their possibilities in the world in which
    they live.
  • be compelling and satisfying enough to encourage
    students to persist in developing their
    capacities.
  • (The Parallel Curriculum Model, Carol Tomlinson
    et al.)

6
  • Teachers who are beginning to implement
    concept-process curriculum models are discovering
    techniques to help students think beyond the
    facts. With a student population that has been
    trained to think more about facts than ideas, the
    transition can be difficult. It takes patience
    and perseverance on the part of the teachers, but
    if they persist, students will begin to
    understand that facts relate to bigger ideas.
  • (H. Lynn Erickson, Concept-Based Curriculum and
    Instruction)

7
What about Standards and Objectives?
  • And those TESTS!

8
Questions to ask yourself . . .
  • What do you really mean when you say Im
    teaching a unit on __________?
  • Why are you teaching a unit on ______?
  • What is the big idea or important lesson you
    want students to understand from this topic or
    unit?
  • What do you want student to know, understand or
    be able to do?

9
Concept Based Curriculum
  • Promotes greater depth of understanding
  • Provides transferable learning
  • Provides structure for students
  • Promotes higher-level thinking
  • Less emphasis on facts
  • Motivation!

10
Designing Curriculum Starting From the Big Idea
  • What are the principles or concepts we can
    explore?
  • What are the essential questions that can be
    asked about these concepts?
  • What content would best illustrate these
    concepts?
  • Which processes should be taught or applied?

11
  • What types of skills will students need to be
    able to demonstrate?
  • What instructional products might be used to
    demonstrate understandings?
  • What activities will help the students uncover
    the big idea?

12
Structure of Knowledge
13
Teaching for Meaning and Understanding
  • Understanding big ideas in content is central to
    the work of students
  • Students can only find and make meaning when they
    are asked to inquire, think at high levels, and
    solve problems.
  • Students should be expected to apply knowledge
    and skills in meaningful tasks within authentic
    contexts.

14
Ten Components of a Comprehensive Curriculum Unit
As outlined in The Parallel Curriculum Model
by Tomlinson, et al., 2002
15
Does that Make it Gifted?
  • Is it differentiated?
  • Is it adapted, modified, or a replacement of
    general education curricula?
  • Is the pace a match to gifted learners?
  • Are there opportunities to extend or go beyond
    the basic unit or curriculum?
  • Are there opportunities to explore personal areas
    of interest, or to highlight personal strength
    areas?
  • Does it demand sufficient depth and higher level
    thinking not based just on factual learning?

16
What About the Affective Domain?
  • Creativity
  • Creative production
  • Creative problem solving
  • Understanding of Self
  • Intrapersonal skills
  • Social Skills and Interactions
  • Intrapersonal skills

17
Two Units
  • Awake Curiosity!

18
Paleontology
19
Why Paleontology?
Why Puzzles?
  • Science is a process of putting together puzzle
    pieces until the big picture becomes more clear
  • Theories change over time
  • Inquiry science process skills
  • Understand the nature of science
  • Practice methodologies and skills used in the
    discipline

20
Would you like to be a Paleontologist?
  • Fossils
  • My, how dinosaurs have changed
  • Careers
  • Create-a-saurus
  • Museum
  • (Evolution)
  • The Big Dig

21
Tyrannosaurus
Charles Knight
22
Make-a-SaurusMy Life with Raptors and Other
Dinosaurs
The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins
23
Bambiraptor KU Museum of Natural History
24
(No Transcript)
25
From the Farmers Field to the White House
  • More than fun with fruits and vegetables

26
  • A Unit for Fourth graders
  • Data collection and analysis graphing
  • Creative skills
  • Propaganda and Persuasion
  • Tie in to election year themes or other

27
What are we Learning?
  • Surveys questions
  • Demographics
  • Data collection
  • Organization
  • Graphs and Charts
  • Analysis, Evaluation
  • Research
  • Ad appeals
  • Creative production
  • Presentation skills
  • Creative language and persuasion
  • Technology skills

28
Is that on the Test?
29
More, More, More . . .
  • Mock Trial
  • Genetics
  • Bridge Building
  • Artifact Exchange
  • Seminars
  • Messages From Space (Astrobiology)
  • Archaeology (DIG) (Interact)
  • Video Production
  • Robotics

30
Middle School Examples
  • Middle School Curriculum planning
  • Principles
  • Template
  • Example

31
Resources and References
The Parallel Curriculum A Design to Develop High
Potential and Challenge High-Ability Learners,
Carol Tomlinson, et al, Corwin Press,
2002 Understanding by Design, Grant Wiggins and
Jay McTighe, ASCD 1998 Concept-Based Curriculum
and Instruction Teaching Beyond the Facts, by H.
Lynn Erickson, Corwin Press, 2002 The Multiple
Menu Model A Practical Guide for Developing
Differentiated Curriculum, by Joseph Renzulli,
Jann Leppien, and Tom Hays, Creative Learning
Press, 2000 Content-Based Curriculum for High
Ability Learners, by Joyce Van-Tassel Baska (with
Catherine A. Little) 2002
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